2

I would like to print first N numbers in BASE62 encoding. What's wrong in my code?

const char ALPHABET[63] = "0123456789abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ";

int main(void) {
    int N = 50;
    for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) {
        int base62 = ALPHABET[i % 62];
        printf("Base 62: %s\n", (char*)base62);
    }
}
  • 2
    base62 is an int. You can't just cast it into a char* and expect %s to print a string! – Spikatrix Apr 7 '15 at 13:53
  • Ok, so what do you suggest to resolve my problem? – Bakus123 Apr 7 '15 at 13:55
  • I'm not familiar with Base62 encoding and stuff... What's the output you want? – Spikatrix Apr 7 '15 at 13:56
  • Generally, I'm looking for fast and simple method to generate all words combinations from alphabet. I thought that base62 is good way to do it.... – Bakus123 Apr 7 '15 at 14:00
1

You need to print out string representing the number in base62. For N >= 62, you will have a multi-character string. First, you would need to count the number of digits in the base62 representation and then display character-by-character.

For that, you need to something like this-

// Count the number of characters the number will need
int num_digits(int num) {
   int count=0;
   while(num > 0) {
      num /= 62;
      count++;
   }
   if(count == 0)
      count = 1;
   return count;
}

int main() {
   const char ALPHABET[63] = "0123456789abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ";
   int i, N=100;
   char STR[10];

   for (i = 0; i < N; i++) {
      int num = i;
      int digits = num_digits(num);
      STR[digits] = '\0';

      while(num > 0) {
         char base62 = ALPHABET[num % 62];
         STR[--digits] = base62;
         num /= 62;
      }

      if(i == 0)
         STR[--digits] = ALPHABET[0];
      printf("%s\n", i, STR);
   }
}
  • 1
    Note: if(count == 0) ... and if(i == 0) ... can eliminated by using a do loop. e.g. do { num /= 62; count++; } while (num > 0);. } – chux - Reinstate Monica Apr 7 '15 at 16:40
2

ALPHABET is an array of chars, so you should be fine with using char base 62 ... and printf("Base 62: %c\n", base62);

Casting a normal int to pointer and passing that to printf as in the original code will lead to printf making invalid memory reads (undefined behavior).

  • Not exactly, for example 100 in base10 = 1c in base62. 1c is not a single character... – Bakus123 Apr 7 '15 at 14:07
  • Do you have any idea what can i do? – Bakus123 Apr 7 '15 at 14:24
1

After accept simplification

As Cool Guy commented, printf("Base 62: %s\n", (char*)base62);, will not convert an int into the desired array of characters. Below code breaks down the value, one base-62 character at a time.

void print_base(unsigned n, unsigned base) {
  static const char ALPHABET[] =
      "0123456789abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ";
  if (n >= base) {
    print_base(n / base, base);
  }
  fputc(ALPHABET[n % base], stdout);
}

#include <stdio.h>
int main(void) {
  print_base(100, 10); // 100
  puts("");
  print_base(100, 16); // 64
  puts("");
  print_base(100, 62); // 1C
  puts("");
  return 0;
}
  • Thanks a lot, very good idea. But is possible to do it without recursion? I will be generated very long numbers on GPU and I can't use recursion (It is possible but only with newest graphics card). – Bakus123 Apr 7 '15 at 17:38
  • 1
    @sray offers a non recursive method. Whatever I would post would simply be a variation of that. BTW: be careful with negative numbers. – chux - Reinstate Monica Apr 7 '15 at 17:59
  • Yes I know that @sray answer is good. But I'm wondering whether it would be possible to write a little more efficiently(for example without nested loops)? I will be use it to brute force method and efficiently is very important for me. – Bakus123 Apr 7 '15 at 18:45
  • 2
    @Bakus123 There is just a single loop of processing for each number. Whether done iteratively or recursively, it's still the same cycle. In my code, the outer loop is for printing all N numbers. – sray Apr 7 '15 at 18:50
  • 1
    @Bakus123 I see no nested loop to print out N in sray answer or your post. "efficiently" is vague. Efficiently in speed, code space, complexity or what? – chux - Reinstate Monica Apr 7 '15 at 18:50

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