11

I want to rotate elements in a list, e.g. - shift the list elements to the right so ['a','b','c','d'] would become ['d','a','b','c'], or [1,2,3] becomes [3,1,2].

I tried the following, but it's not working:

def shift(aList):
    n = len(aList)
    for i in range(len(aList)):
        if aList[i] != aList[n-1]:
            aList[i] = aList[i+1]
             return aList
         elif aList[i] == aList[i-1]:
            aList[i] = aList[0]
            return aList
shift(aList=[1,2,3])
3
  • Im trying to shift the elements to the right so ['a','b','c','d'] would change to ['d','a','b','c']
    – nesman
    Apr 7 '15 at 18:30
  • 1
    Ignoring all the temporary lists create you could simply: a[:] = a[1:] + a[:1] you can rotate an arbitrary amount (n) a[:] = a[n:] + a[:n]
    – AChampion
    Apr 7 '15 at 18:42

14 Answers 14

14

You can use negative indices together with list concatenation:

def shift(seq, n=0):
    a = n % len(seq)
    return seq[-a:] + seq[:-a]
9

If you are allergic to slice notation: a.insert(0,a.pop())

Usage:

In [15]: z=[1,2,3]

In [16]: z.insert(0,z.pop())

In [17]: z
Out[17]: [3, 1, 2]

In [18]: z.insert(0,z.pop())

In [19]: z
Out[19]: [2, 3, 1]
7

If you are trying to shift the elements, use collections.deque rotate method:

#! /usr/bin/python3

from collections import deque
a = deque([1, 2, 3, 4])
a.rotate()
print(a)

Result:

[2, 3, 4, 1]
2
  • With the slice, you are reversing not shifting. Apr 7 '15 at 18:35
  • @MalikBrahimi: I know, but the question was unclear so I as unsure if he wanted to shift it or reverse it
    – aldeb
    Apr 7 '15 at 18:36
7

You can use this:

li=li[-1:]+li[:-1]
0
5

You can just slice the last element off the list, then add it to the beginning of a new list:

aList = [aList[-1]] + aList[:-1]

Here is the result:

>>> aList = [1,2,3]
>>> aList = [aList[-1]] + aList[:-1]
>>> aList
[3, 1, 2]
3

The question seems to imply to me that the list itself should be modified rather than a new list created. A simple in place algorithm is therefore:

lst = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]

e1 = lst[-1]
for i, e2 in enumerate(lst):
    lst[i], e1 = e1, e2

print(lst)

Giving:

[5, 1, 2, 3, 4]
2

If you actually want to shift the elements, you can use modulo to cycle the list and reassign the elements to their shifted positions:

def shift(lst, shft=0):
    ln = len(lst)
    for i, ele in enumerate(lst[:]):
        lst[(i + shft) % ln] = ele
    return lst

In [3]: shift( ['a','b','c','d'] , 1)
Out[3]: ['d', 'a', 'b', 'c']

In [4]: shift( ['a','b','c','d'] , 2)
Out[4]: ['c', 'd', 'a', 'b']

In [5]: shift( ['a','b','c','d'] , 3)
Out[5]: ['b', 'c', 'd', 'a']

If you only want a single shift just shift the last element to the front extending the list:

def shift(lst):
    lst[0:1] = [lst.pop(),lst[0]]
    return lst

Both of which change the original list.

1

Simple use of slice syntax:

def shift(seq):
    return [seq[-1]] + seq[:-1]

assert shift([1, 2, 3, 4, 5]) == [5, 1, 2, 3, 4]

Generalized version with changeable shift:

def shift(seq, shift=1):
    return seq[-shift:] + seq[:-shift]

assert shift([1, 2, 3, 4, 5]) == [5, 1, 2, 3, 4]
assert shift([1, 2, 3, 4, 5], 2) == [4, 5, 1, 2, 3]
0

Use a function assuming n is the shift that is less than the length of list l like so:

shift = lambda l, n: l[-n:] + l[:-n] # i.e. shift([1, 2, 3, 4], 3)
0

This could be done simply by using list method: insert,

values = [2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13]

def shift(list):
    new_list = []

    for i in list:
        new_list.insert(len(new_list)-1, i)

    return new_list

print(shift(values))

Output is:

[3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 2]
0

Solution for your query :

def shift(aList):
    l = list()
    n = len(aList)
    l.append(aList[-1])
    temp = aList[:n-1]
    for i in temp:
        l.append(i)
    return l
print(shift(aList=[1,2,3]))
0

you can use roll function from numpy.

>>> import numpy as np
>>> q = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
>>> np.roll(q, 2)
array([4, 5, 1, 2, 3])

Hope it helps!

0

shift right and shift left functions:

def left_shift(seq, n=0):
    a = n % len(seq)
    return seq[1:] + [seq[0]]

def right_shift(seq, n=0):
    a = n % len(seq)
    return seq[-a:] + seq[:-a]

seq=right_shift(seq,1)
0

You can use list slicing with '+'

For left shift

def left_shift(seq):
    return seq[1:]+[seq[0]]

For Right shift

def right_shift(seq):
    return seq[-1:]+seq[:-1]

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