550

I want to use Flexbox that has some number of items that are all the same width. I've noticed that Flexbox distributes the space around evenly, rather than the space itself.

For example:

.header {
  display: flex;
}

.item {
  flex-grow: 1;
  text-align: center;
  border: 1px solid black;
}
<div class="header">
  <div class="item">asdfasdfasdfasdfasdfasdf</div>
  <div class="item">z</div>
</div>

The first item is a lot bigger than the second. If I have three items, four items, or n items, I want them all to appear on the same line with an equal amount of space per item.

Any ideas?

http://codepen.io/anon/pen/gbJBqM

14 Answers 14

780

Set them so that their flex-basis is 0 (so all elements have the same starting point), and allow them to grow:

flex: 1 1 0px;

Your IDE or linter might mention that the unit of measure 'px' is redundant. If you leave it out (like: flex: 1 1 0), IE will not render this correctly. So the px is required to support Internet Explorer, as mentioned in the comments by @fabb;

13
  • 180
    It should be noted that the flex property is a shorthand property for the flex-grow, flex-shrink and flex-basis properties. It's recommended to use the shorthand over the individual properties as the shorthand correctly resets any unspecified components to accommodate common uses. The initial value is 0 1 auto.
    – j08691
    Commented Mar 12, 2018 at 14:36
  • 4
    note that IE11 ignores unitless flex-basis values: github.com/philipwalton/flexbugs#flexbug-4
    – fabb
    Commented Aug 2, 2019 at 11:27
  • 40
    I had to add min-width: 0 to achieve using child elements with overflowing text. See css-tricks.com/flexbox-truncated-text
    – clemlatz
    Commented Oct 20, 2019 at 10:45
  • 12
    I just want to mention that the Internet Explorer (IE) should be ignored. This is an obsolete browser like e.g. Netscape Navigator. The IE was officially replaced by Microsoft Edge. The latest version also runs on Chromium (like Chrome and other modern browsers.) We as web developers should no longer support IE. It is your responsibility to get rid of this crutch. :) Never talk about IE again.
    – Domske
    Commented Mar 10, 2021 at 11:00
  • 1
    This does not seem to work if some of the items contain padding. Removing the padding makes all the child elements the same size. Any suggestions to avoid removing padding?
    – redfox05
    Commented Mar 19, 2021 at 10:18
226

You need to add width: 0 to make columns equal if contents of the items make it grow bigger.

.item {
  flex: 1 1 0;
  width: 0;
}

Detail: flex: 1 1 0 is the same as flex-grow: 1; flex-shrink: 1; flex-basis: 0; and if the parent container can not provide enough space for the native-size added together of every item (no space to grow), we need to make the width: 0 to give every item the same start point to grow.

11
  • 13
    This appears to be necessary if the contents of .item cause it to grow wider than .item would naturally be.
    – Bungle
    Commented Dec 15, 2017 at 21:16
  • 2
    I think you mean flex: 1 1 0;, instead of flex-grow: 1 1 0; Commented Nov 26, 2018 at 13:40
  • 1
    In my use case, I was wrapping charts that dynamically adjust to their parent's size and width 0 was necessary for them to work. I am not sure how they were determining the proper width, but flex basis certainly did not work on chrome 72 (released Jan 2019).
    – Andy Groff
    Commented Mar 13, 2019 at 23:14
  • 3
    This was the only solution that worked on my situation. Seems that in my case, children was growing bigger than it naturally would, and flex: 1 1 0 was not having any effect
    – Danielo515
    Commented Jul 13, 2020 at 16:16
  • 1
    Works but what an absolutely mess coding wise. Impossible to figure out by looking at the code "oh of course this is width 0"
    – lowkey
    Commented Feb 24 at 13:42
154

You could add flex-basis: 100% to achieve this.

Updated Example

.header {
  display: flex;
}

.item {
  flex-basis: 100%;
  text-align: center;
  border: 1px solid black;
}

For what it's worth, you could also use flex: 1 for the same results as well.

The shorthand of flex: 1 is the same as flex: 1 1 0, which is equivalent to:

.item {
  flex-grow: 1;
  flex-shrink: 1;
  flex-basis: 0;
  text-align: center;
  border: 1px solid black;
}
9
  • 3
    This is not correct. The default flex value is flex: 0 1 auto. Which means setting flex: 1 will result in flex: 1 1 auto. This will not work. The correct answer is flex: 1 1 0 as stated above by Adam
    – r.sendecky
    Commented Jan 29, 2017 at 5:47
  • 33
    @r.sendecky No, you are the one who is incorrect. As I stated in my answer, the shorthand of flex: 1 results in flex: 1 1 0 not flex: 1 1 auto like you are claiming. Take a look at the official W3 specification under the 'flex shorthand' section: when flex-basis is "omitted from the flex shorthand, its specified value is 0", not auto. Thanks for the random downvote. Commented Jan 29, 2017 at 16:28
  • 2
    @r.sendecky - Also, take a look at this example I created to visualize the variations. Commented Jan 29, 2017 at 16:36
  • 1
    Mate, I don't do random down-vote. I test before I write. And I did test it. Your answer does not work - simple as that. I had exactly the same issue not long ago with flex: 1 and flex-direction: column. The children height was not the same when other elements are placed within children. The only thing that fixed it was setting flex: 1 1 0. It still stand today with chromium 55.0.2883.87
    – r.sendecky
    Commented Jan 30, 2017 at 0:09
  • 6
    @JoshCrozier confirmed that flex: 1 has the same behavior as flex: 1 1 0, and flex: 0 1 auto has different behavior.
    – Ivan Durst
    Commented Jul 28, 2017 at 18:04
45

The accepted answer by Adam (flex: 1 1 0) works perfectly for flexbox containers whose width is either fixed, or determined by an ancestor. Situations where you want the children to fit the container.

However, you may have a situation where you want the container to fit the children, with the children equally sized based on the largest child. You can make a flexbox container fit its children by either:

  • setting position: absolute and not setting width or right, or
  • place it inside a wrapper with display: inline-block

For such flexbox containers, the accepted answer does NOT work, the children are not sized equally. I presume that this is a limitation of flexbox, since it behaves the same in Chrome, Firefox and Safari.

The solution is to use a grid instead of a flexbox.

When you run this snippet, make sure to click on full page to see the effect properly.

body {
  margin: 1em;
}

.wrap-inline-block {
  display: inline-block;
}

#div0, #div1, #div2, #div3, #div4 {
  border: 1px solid #888;
  padding: 0.5em;
  text-align: center;
  white-space: nowrap;
}

#div2, #div4 {
  position: absolute;
  left: 1em;
}

#div0>*, #div1>*, #div2>*, #div3>*, #div4>* {
  margin: 0.5em;
  color: white;
  background-color: navy;
  padding: 0.5em;
}

#div0, #div1, #div2 {
  display: flex;
}

#div0>*, #div1>*, #div2>* {
  flex: 1 1 0;
}

#div0 {
  margin-bottom: 1em;
}

#div2 {
  top: 15.5em;
}

#div3, #div4 {
  display: grid;
  grid-template-columns: repeat(3,1fr);
}

#div4 {
  top: 28.5em;
}
<p>Normal scenario — flexbox where the children adjust to fit the container — and the children are made equal size by setting {flex: 1 1 0}</p>

<div id="div0">
  <div>
    Flexbox
  </div>
  <div>
    Width determined by viewport
  </div>
  <div>
    All child elements are equal size with {flex: 1 1 0}
  </div>
</div>

<p>Now we want to have the container fit the children, but still have the children all equally sized, based on the largest child. We can see that {flex: 1 1 0} has no effect.</p>

<div class="wrap-inline-block">
<div id="div1">
  <div>
    Flexbox
  </div>
  <div>
    Inside inline-block
  </div>
  <div>
    We want all children to be the size of this text
  </div>
</div>
</div>

<div id="div2">
  <div>
    Flexbox
  </div>
  <div>
    Absolutely positioned
  </div>
  <div>
    We want all children to be the size of this text
  </div>
</div>

<br><br><br><br><br><br>
<p>So let's try a grid instead. Aha! That's what we want!</p>

<div class="wrap-inline-block">
<div id="div3">
  <div>
    Grid
  </div>
  <div>
    Inside inline-block
  </div>
  <div>
    We want all children to be the size of this text
  </div>
</div>
</div>

<div id="div4">
  <div>
    Grid
  </div>
  <div>
    Absolutely positioned
  </div>
  <div>
    We want all children to be the size of this text
  </div>
</div>

2
  • Is there a way to get the same effect without hardcoding the number of children in css?
    – Davorin
    Commented Sep 17, 2020 at 13:20
  • 3
    @Davorin grid-template-columns: repeat(auto-fill, minmax(100px, auto)); More details at css-tricks.com/…
    – OXiGEN
    Commented Feb 14, 2021 at 14:09
9

I’m not an expert with Flexbox, but I got there by setting the basis to 50% for the two items I was dealing with. Grow to 1 and shrink to 0.

Inline styling: flex: '1 0 50%',

1
  • This was the one that surprisingly worked for me. Tyty.
    – Besto
    Commented Sep 28, 2022 at 14:31
7

None of these solutions worked for me, but this did:

.header {
  display: flex;
}

.item {
  width: 100%;
}


/* Demo styles, for aesthetics. */

.demo {
  margin: 3rem;
}

.demo .item {
  text-align: center;
  padding: 3rem;
  background-color: #eee;
  margin: 0 1.5rem;
}
<div class="demo">
  <div class="header">
    <div class="item">
      1
    </div>
    <div class="item">
      2
    </div>
    <div class="item">
      3
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

<div class="demo">
  <div class="header">
    <div class="item">
      1
    </div>
    <div class="item">
      2
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

<div class="demo">
  <div class="header">
    <div class="item">
      1
    </div>
    <div class="item">
      2
    </div>
    <div class="item">
      3
    </div>
    <div class="item">
      4
    </div>
    <div class="item">
      5
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

0
5

None of these answers solved my problem, which was that the items weren't the same width in my makeshift flexbox table when it was shrunk to a width too small.

The solution for me was simply to put overflow: hidden; on the flex-grow: 1; cells.

1
  • Or alternatively, you could use @Josh_Crozier's answer and conditionally set flex-wrap: wrap; when the browser window is below a certain width. This will cause the items to wrap and take up 100% of the parent width.
    – clayRay
    Commented Jul 1, 2021 at 4:41
4

On the child element of flex,

flex: 1 1 25%

this will allow to have four items.

If you want to add more items then you can decrease the %.

1
  • This worked for me adding a max-width value for items that content was also a flex container and its size was not big enough. Commented Nov 3, 2023 at 5:45
2

It can be very difficult to reliably distribute columns evenly with flexbox for complicated reasons involving padding, border and margin which this article explains in detail.

One alternative suggested there is to instead use a grid with these styles:

.grid-container {
  display: grid;
  grid-auto-flow: column;
  grid-auto-columns: 1fr;
}
1

This will work even if you wrapping items, like a Grid, but not so simple you should show where it will wrap in media queries)).

Example:

.flex-item {
    flex: 0 0 calc(25% - (45px / 4))
}

It works like this:

$n: 4; // Number of columns
$gap: 15px; // Margin pixels

.flex-parent {
    display: flex;
    gap: $gap;
}
.flex-item {
    flex: 0 0 calc(100% / $n - (($n - 1) * $gap / $n));
}
1
  • 4 cols) flex: 0 0 calc(25% - (30px / 4 ) ); 3 cols) flex: 0 0 calc(33.3% - (20px / 3) ); 2 cols) flex: 0 0 calc(50% - (10px / 2) );
    – Hyzyr
    Commented Jan 22, 2022 at 19:33
0

I was having a similar issue and found a way to cheat.

As others have said, flex-basis and flex-grow: 1 are the way to keep items the same size, but the last row is an exception when there are too few items (they fill all available space, making them larger than the other items). To stop this from happening, I added an empty spacer item with visibility: hidden and set the flex-grow value inline based on a quick calculation of how many items there were.

This is easier if you know the width of the parent container but even if you don't, you can set the flex-grow value on the spacer using media queries and breakpoints.

0

React Natve FlexBox

To have the same sizes for the children on a React Native project do the following:

const styles = StyleSheet.create({
  itemsWrapper: {
    flexDirection: 'row',
    gap: 4,
    justifyContent: 'space-between',
  },
  item: {
    flexGrow: 1,
    flexShrink: 1,
    flexBasis: 0,
  },
})
0
const styles = StyleSheet.create({
  itemsWrapper: {
    display: 'flex',
    flex: 1,
    flexDirection: 'row',
    gap: 4,
    justifyContent: 'space-between',
  },
  item: {
    display: 'flex',
    flex: 1,
  },
})

By adding item to 2 or more containers, you will have it at the same width as your primary axis is X (for the flexDirection: 'row')

Hope this helps!

-1
.container{
display:flex;
flex-wrap:wrap;
}

.item{
flex basis:(add required width px)
}

If the last row has just one element and it is taking up all the width, then remove 'flex-grow' from flex item and try adding just 'flex-basis:(req px)' or 'flex-shrink:1'. It worked for me!

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