451

I'm using Enum4 library to create an enum class as follows:

class Color(Enum):
    RED = 1
    BLUE = 2

I want to print [1, 2] as a list somewhere. How can I achieve this?

17 Answers 17

985
+50

You can do the following:

[e.value for e in Color]
7
  • 5
    Suprisingly complicated for python to check if a value is in the enum, if foo in [e.value for e in Color] Commented Sep 17, 2021 at 17:09
  • 15
    @run_the_race This isn't pretty but it's shorter: if foo in e.__members__.values() Commented Oct 29, 2021 at 19:07
  • @ori your example does not make sense because it will fail if 1 is not in Color. Going this way you could do try: Color(1) except ValueError: ... which is actually very pythonic
    – Mickael V.
    Commented Dec 14, 2021 at 22:46
  • 7
    @PaulBissex your example does not work. e.__members__.values() returns instances of the enum objects, not their values.
    – Jugdish
    Commented May 29, 2022 at 19:26
  • No need to iterate, follow this answer stackoverflow.com/a/60763091/2582581
    – Wildhammer
    Commented Jun 15, 2022 at 17:14
165

Based on the answer by @Jeff, refactored to use a classmethod so that you can reuse the same code for any of your enums:

from enum import Enum

class ExtendedEnum(Enum):

    @classmethod
    def list(cls):
        return list(map(lambda c: c.value, cls))

class OperationType(ExtendedEnum):
    CREATE = 'CREATE'
    STATUS = 'STATUS'
    EXPAND = 'EXPAND'
    DELETE = 'DELETE'

print(OperationType.list())

Produces:

['CREATE', 'STATUS', 'EXPAND', 'DELETE']
8
  • 2
    Beautiful! I've been trying to do exactly this for about an hour but was use not grasping the need for the classmethod. I was attempting to just subclass and add a property attribute, but could not get the super().__init__() to properly pass arguments to Enum. Thanks! Commented Oct 21, 2021 at 18:37
  • 11
    Why make things extra confusing with a map? Guido wanted to remove them because you can do the same thing with generators more clearly. [c.value for c in cls] is the preferred syntax in Python. (Doesn't matter here but one benefit is avoiding the extra per-item lambda calls and the map overhead). Or just the builtin Enum._member_names_. Commented Jun 14, 2022 at 6:48
  • I think you could rename the list method to values` in case other functions are added that return lists. And Q. would changing @classmethod to @staticmethod be cleaner and closer to the intent?
    – Carl
    Commented Aug 5, 2022 at 15:48
  • 1
    This is a clever solution, but not, I think, a good one. It only works for enums that you own and control. Commented May 25, 2023 at 16:29
  • 2
    Using list comprehension like this: [e.value for e in Color] would be better than list of map of lambda
    – hiru007
    Commented Jun 23, 2023 at 12:25
132

Use _member_names_ for a quick easy result if it is just the names, i.e.

Color._member_names_

Also, you have _member_map_ which returns an ordered dictionary of the elements. This function returns a collections.OrderedDict, so you have Color._member_map_.items() and Color._member_map_.values() to play with. E.g.

return list(map(lambda x: x.value, Color._member_map_.values()))

will return all the valid values of Color

13
  • 30
    Underrated answer. Commented Apr 16, 2021 at 16:18
  • 7
    This seems a little dirty though, because it's using the private properties of Enum class.
    – HosseyNJF
    Commented Oct 19, 2021 at 12:37
  • 3
    @HosseyNJF _member_names_ is not private, it is just a magic/dunder method.
    – EliuX
    Commented Oct 19, 2021 at 14:50
  • 16
    @EliuX Doesn't the leading underscore indicate a non-public value per PEP 8? It's also not documented.
    – Antrikshy
    Commented Feb 18, 2022 at 1:17
  • 6
    @t3chb0t Python's decision to make it a _ (private, but not private internal) was a choice to say "don't use this unless you know what you're doing". If they didn't want us using private methods, they should have made them __ or maybe Python should have actual method privacy 😊 Commented Mar 25, 2023 at 5:23
76

You can use IntEnum:

from enum import IntEnum

class Color(IntEnum):
   RED = 1
   BLUE = 2


print(int(Color.RED))   # prints 1

To get list of the ints:

enum_list = list(map(int, Color))
print(enum_list) # prints [1, 2]
8
  • You use third party one. But it also says it has intenum
    – Marcin
    Commented Apr 7, 2015 at 23:52
  • How do i print like [(1,'RED'), (2, 'BLUE')] Commented Apr 8, 2015 at 1:11
  • 1
    What about this: a = [(int(v), str(v)) for v in Color] and then print(a).
    – Marcin
    Commented Apr 8, 2015 at 2:37
  • 86
    How about this: [(color.value, color.name) for color in Color] Commented Feb 26, 2016 at 16:00
  • 4
    @vlad-ardelean's comment is the best and most pythonic. That's idiomatic usage of the Enum type, elegant, and eminently readable Commented Dec 22, 2016 at 22:56
45

To use Enum with any type of value, try this:
Updated with some improvements... Thanks @Jeff, by your tip!

from enum import Enum

class Color(Enum):
    RED = 1
    GREEN = 'GREEN'
    BLUE = ('blue', '#0000ff')

    @staticmethod
    def list():
        return list(map(lambda c: c.value, Color))

print(Color.list())

As result:

[1, 'GREEN', ('blue', '#0000ff')]
6
  • 9
    I would use @classmethod instead of @ staticmethod Commented Feb 17, 2018 at 18:12
  • 3
    @ISONecroMAn I guess @classmethod would require to create instance of Color class. That's why staticmethod seems to be correct choice here. Commented Dec 1, 2018 at 18:22
  • 1
    @LeonidDashko not at all. See my answer.
    – blueFast
    Commented Feb 28, 2019 at 5:59
  • @LeonidDashko @dangoonfast is correct. You can use @classmethod and use return list(map(lambda c: c.value, cls)) instead.
    – Riptyde4
    Commented Nov 21, 2019 at 23:31
  • 4
    If you have so many Enum Values that speed matters more than readability here, there is something else wrong...
    – Suzana
    Commented Nov 6, 2020 at 14:21
36

Just use:

[e.value for e in Color]

Produces:

[1, 2]

And to get the names, use:

[e.name for e in Color]

Produces:

['RED', 'BLUE']

25

class enum.Enum is a class that solves all your enumeration needs, so you just need to inherit from it, and add your own fields. Then from then on, all you need to do is to just call it's attributes: name & value:

from enum import Enum

class Letter(Enum):
   A = 1
   B = 2
   C = 3

print({i.name: i.value for i in Letter})
# prints {'A': 1, 'B': 2, 'C': 3}
0
20

You can have a SuperEnum like:

from enum import Enum

class SuperEnum(Enum):    
    @classmethod
    def to_dict(cls):
        """Returns a dictionary representation of the enum."""
        return {e.name: e.value for e in cls}
    
    @classmethod
    def keys(cls):
        """Returns a list of all the enum keys."""
        return cls._member_names_
    
    @classmethod
    def values(cls):
        """Returns a list of all the enum values."""
        return list(cls._value2member_map_.keys())

and use it like:

class Roles(SuperEnum):
    ADMIN = 1
    USER = 2
    GUEST = 3

so you can:

Roles.to_dict() # {'ADMIN': 1, 'USER': 2, 'GUEST': 3}
Roles.keys() # ['ADMIN', 'USER', 'GUEST']
Roles.values() # [1, 2, 3]
16

if you are using StrEnum or IntEnum, just use the built-in star expression to unpack:

from enum import IntEnum
class Color(IntEnum):
    RED = 0
    GREEN = 1
colors = [*Color]
1
  • In my experience, this even worked with the plain Enum class
    – viam0Zah
    Commented Jul 10 at 15:30
13

Using a classmethod with __members__:

class RoleNames(str, Enum):
    AGENT = "agent"
    USER = "user"
    PRIMARY_USER = "primary_user"
    SUPER_USER = "super_user"
    
    @classmethod
    def list_roles(cls):
        role_names = [member.value for role, member in cls.__members__.items()]
        return role_names
>>> role_names = RoleNames.list_roles()
>>> print(role_names)

or if you have multiple Enum classes and want to abstract the classmethod:

class BaseEnum(Enum):
    @classmethod
    def list_roles(cls):
        role_names = [member.value for role, member in cls.__members__.items()]
        return role_names


class RoleNames(str, BaseEnum):    
    AGENT = "agent"
    USER = "user"
    PRIMARY_USER = "primary_user"
    SUPER_USER = "super_user"
    

class PermissionNames(str, BaseEnum):
    READ = "updated_at"
    WRITE = "sort_by"
    READ_WRITE = "sort_order"

10

So the Enum has a __members__ dict. The solution that @ozgur proposed is really the best, but you can do this, which does the same thing, with more work

[color.value for color_name, color in Color.__members__.items()]

The __members__ dictionary could come in handy if you wanted to insert stuff dynamically in it... in some crazy situation.

[EDIT] Apparently __members__ is not a dictionary, but a map proxy. Which means you can't easily add items to it.

You can however do weird stuff like MyEnum.__dict__['_member_map_']['new_key'] = 'new_value', and then you can use the new key like MyEnum.new_key.... but this is just an implementation detail, and should not be played with. Black magic is payed for with huge maintenance costs.

3
  • Just a sidebar: can items be added to __members__? It would an interesting way to allow extensions thereby creating new Enum members. ... btw, upvoted for bringing a new (to me) attribute to the table.
    – IAbstract
    Commented Feb 26, 2016 at 17:34
  • @IAbstract: No, that is disallowed. If someone does figure out a way to add/subtract members after the Enum is created they will probably break that Enum. Commented Mar 9, 2016 at 9:10
  • @IAbstract: Add new members after the fact is not usually a good idea. If you really want to, check out this answer. Commented Apr 13, 2016 at 18:50
9

One way is to get the keys of the _value2member_map_ property:

class Color(Enum):
    RED = 1
    BLUE = 2

list(Color._value2member_map_.keys())
# [1, 2]
3
  • 1
    Also there is ._member_map_ method too, it maybe useful in some cases. Commented Oct 1, 2021 at 16:42
  • 3
    This answer deserves to be higher up
    – vianmixt
    Commented May 19, 2022 at 9:15
  • Not sure why this isn't documented in the official docs for enum. This is super useful.
    – Le Sir Dog
    Commented Mar 14 at 8:24
7

Given an enum based on the standard python3 Enum/IntEnum classes:

from enum import IntEnum

class LogLevel(IntEnum):
    DEBUG = 0
    INFO = 1
    WARNING = 2
    ERROR = 3

one can do the following to get a list of enum constants:

>>> print(list(LogLevel))
[<LogLevel.DEBUG: 0>, <LogLevel.INFO: 1>, <LogLevel.WARNING: 2>, <LogLevel.ERROR: 3>]

I find it more expressive to work on enum constants instead of ints. If the enum is inheriting from IntEnum, all enum constants are also ints and can used as such everywhere:

>>> level = LogLevel.DEBUG

>>> level == 0
True

>>> level == 1
False

>>> level == LogLevel.INFO
False

>>> level == LogLevel.DEBUG
True

>>> "%d" % level
'0'

>>> "%s" % level
'LogLevel.DEBUG'
3

An alternative form of the SuperEnum suggested by @supermodo, which allows iterating over the key-value pairs, and has less magic:

class SuperEnum(IntEnum):

    @classmethod
    def to_dict(cls):
        return {e.name: e.value for e in cls}

    @classmethod
    def items(cls):
        return [(e.name, e.value) for e in cls]

    @classmethod
    def keys(cls):
        return [e.name for e in cls]

    @classmethod
    def values(cls):
        return [e.value for e in cls]

Used like this:

class Roles(SuperEnum):
    ADMIN = 1
    USER = 2
    GUEST = 3

Allows you to do:

Roles.keys()  # ['ADMIN', 'USER', 'GUEST']
Roles.values()  # [1, 2, 3]
Roles.to_dict()  # {'ADMIN': 1, 'USER': 2, 'GUEST': 3}
for key, val in Roles.items():
    print(f"{key} > {val}")  # ADMIN -> 1, etc.

Generators (optimization)

Note that if you prefer generators over lists as return values for items(), keys() and values() then use round braces () instead of square brackets [], e.g.

    @classmethod
    def items(cls):
        return ((e.name, e.value) for e in cls)

    @classmethod
    def keys(cls):
        return (e.name for e in cls)

    @classmethod
    def values(cls):
        return (e.value for e in cls)

Generators are more memory-efficient and often preferred in the Python 3 standard library. The downside of them is that you need to convert them to lists to see the complete result (e.g. when working with them interactively), e.g.

Roles.items()  # <generator object SuperEnum.items.<locals>.<genexpr> at 0x7f3a8c787370>
list(Roles.items())  # [('ADMIN', 1), ('USER', 2), ('GUEST', 3)]
list(Roles.keys())  # ['ADMIN', 'USER', 'GUEST']
list(Roles.values())  # [1, 2, 3]
2

Here are some examples to easily convert Enum to a list/array of int, str, or Enum AND be able to sort.

import numpy as np

class Color(int,Enum):
    YELLOW = 3
    RED = 1
    BLUE = 2
    
print('1):',list(Color))
print('2):',np.array(list(Color))) ## int64 (8 bytes)
print('3):',sorted(np.array(Color, dtype=str)))
print('4):',np.array(sorted(Color), dtype=object))
print('5):',np.array(sorted(Color), dtype=np.int8)) # 1 byte
print('6):',np.array(sorted(Color, key=lambda x: -x.value), dtype=np.int8))
print('7):',np.array(sorted(Color, key=lambda x: str(x)), dtype=np.int8))

class Color(tuple,Enum):
    YELLOW = (3,3)
    RED = (1,1)
    BLUE = (2,2)
    
print('8):',np.array(sorted(Color)))
print('9):',list(map(tuple,sorted(Color, key=lambda x: -x[1]))))

Output:

1): [<Color.YELLOW: 3>, <Color.RED: 1>, <Color.BLUE: 2>]
2): [3 1 2]
3): ['Color.BLUE', 'Color.RED', 'Color.YELLOW']
4): [<Color.RED: 1> <Color.BLUE: 2> <Color.YELLOW: 3>]
5): [1 2 3]
6): [3 2 1]
7): [2 1 3]
8): [[1 1]
 [2 2]
 [3 3]]
9): [(3, 3), (2, 2), (1, 1)]
0

I believe an important comment on some of the answers above is to avoid naming a class method with the python builtin "list"

based on that: https://github.com/encode/django-rest-framework/issues/5884

1
0

Im gonna throw another option into the mix.

If you don't want to refactor your current code with a different base class to all enums (like the inheritance answers in this thread), you can create a mixin class and just add it to the enums that need that functionality like so:

class ListValsMixIn:

    @classmethod
    def list(cls):
        return list(map(lambda c: c.value, cls))

class Color(ListValsMixIn, Enum):
    RED = 1
    BLUE = 2

print(Color.list())

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