5

I am wondering how I can easily move data between a parent table and its child table in PostgreSQL (9.4) and vice versa.

Assume that I have the following database sample set up:

DROP TABLE IF EXISTS employee CASCADE;
DROP TABLE IF EXISTS director CASCADE;

CREATE TABLE employee(
id SERIAL PRIMARY KEY NOT NULL,
name VARCHAR(255) NOT NULL,
surname VARCHAR(255) NOT NULL,
employment_date DATE NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_DATE
);

CREATE TABLE director(
director_id SERIAL PRIMARY KEY NOT NULL,
secretary_id INT4 REFERENCES employee(id),
extra_legal_benefits VARCHAR(255) ARRAY
) inherits (employee);

INSERT INTO employee(name, surname)
VALUES ('Alice', 'Alisson');

INSERT INTO employee(name, surname)
VALUES ('Bob', 'Bobson');

INSERT INTO employee(name, surname)
VALUES ('Carol', 'Clarckson');

INSERT INTO director(name, surname, secretary_id, extra_legal_benefits)
VALUES ('David', 'Davidson', 1, '{car, travel expenses}');

How can I promote (move) one of the employees to the director table (must no longer appear in the parent)?

How can I demote (move) one of the directors back to the employees table (must no longer apear in the child)?

1
  • 1
    VARCHAR(255)- are you aware that the limit of 255 has no special meaning, hidden optimization or some magic performance advantage compared to a value of e.g. 376 or 52957? Apr 8 '15 at 8:45
8

Promote an employee:

with deleted as (
  delete from only employee 
  where name = 'Carol'
  returning *
)
insert into director (name, surname, secretary_id, extra_legal_benefits)
select name, surname, null, '{flight}'
from deleted;

However:

must no longer appear in the parent

Any row in the child table is by definition available in the parent table. You can only "hide" those rows if you use the predicate only when selecting from the employee table:

select *
from only employee;

The above will not show employees that are also director. A plain select * from employee however will show all names (but you can't distinguish them - that's the nature of inheritance).


Demote a director:

with deleted as (
  delete from only director 
  where name = 'David'
  returning *
)
insert into employee (name, surname)
select name, surname
from deleted;

But to be honest, I'd probably model this through an additional column (like position or role) on the employee entity instead of using inheritance. Or even a many-to-many relationship to a position (or role) entity as it is not uncommon that employees have multiple roles, e.g. in different departments, teams or other contexts.

8
  • 3
    Thank you very much for your accurate and detailed answer. I totally agree with your comment that this could have been modeled alternatively in a real production database. However as a sample, it suits perfectly to understand and explain the inheritance question I had.
    – zip4ever
    Apr 8 '15 at 9:16
  • Will postgresql tolerate keeping an id column such as id SERIAL PRIMARY KEY using this delete-insert construct?
    – retorquere
    Jan 22 '17 at 13:19
  • @retorquere By default, child tables don't inherit constraints. If, however, you specifically added the same pk sequence and constraint to the child table, you will get a unique constraint violation. Jan 23 '17 at 14:04
  • @deinspanjer so if I understand correctly, any constraints I want to have apply to both the parent and child table I'd have to implement in both?
    – retorquere
    Jan 23 '17 at 17:55
  • @retorquere Yes. Read the pg docs on table inheritance. Constraints don't inherit. That means if the parent table has a declaration of id SERIAL PRIMARY KEY, you could insert id = 1 in the parent and then id = 1 in the child because the child's id column will just be a plain INT generated by the sequence with no constraint. To get the constraint, after creating the child table, CREATE UNIQUE INDEX child_uidx ON child(id); and ALTER TABLE child ADD PRIMARY KEY USING INDEX child_uidx; Of course, then you will get that violation I mentioned if you try the code in the answer above. Jan 23 '17 at 18:27

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