6

When I run the below mentioned code EF saves the PersonAddress with the correct PersonId. I have NOT added the PersonAddress entities to the Person entity, even though I have not done this the records in my database are linked correctly.

My question is: Does EF automatically add the related entities even though I have not specified the entity that it belongs to? And if so can this not cause unwanted entity relations?

Update

It seems that the entities are saved correctly for the following reasons:

  1. When creating entity Person the PersonId field is 0
  2. PersonAddress.PersonId is also 0 at the time of creation.

By manually setting the Person.PersonId to any value at the time of creation, and then setting PersonAddress.PersonId to that same value of Person.PersonId EF saves the data correctly as they share the same PersonId.

So technically EF does not add the related entities automatically, they are related as they share the same PersonId.

Please see code below as reference:

        using (var context = new Models.TestEntities())
        {
            var person = context.People.Create();

            var postalAddress           = context.PersonAddresses.Create();
            postalAddress.AddressLine1  = "PostalAddressLine1";

            var residentialAddress          = context.PersonAddresses.Create();
            residentialAddress.AddressLine1 = "ResidentialAddressLine1";

            context.People.Add(person);
            context.PersonAddresses.Add(postalAddress);
            context.PersonAddresses.Add(residentialAddress);

            context.SaveChanges();
        }

When I add an extra Person to the code, I get the following error: enter image description here
Code:

        using (var context = new Models.TestEntities())
        {
            var person  = context.People.Create();
            var person2 = context.People.Create();

            var postalAddress           = context.PersonAddresses.Create();
            postalAddress.AddressLine1  = "PostalAddressLine1";

            var residentialAddress          = context.PersonAddresses.Create();
            residentialAddress.AddressLine1 = "ResidentialAddressLine1";

            context.People.Add(person);
            context.People.Add(person2);                

            context.PersonAddresses.Add(postalAddress);
            context.PersonAddresses.Add(residentialAddress);

            context.SaveChanges();
        }

As the error specified Entityframework can now not determine to whom the PersonAddress entities belong.

I can resolve this by modifying the code as below:

        using (var context = new Models.TestEntities())
        {
            var person  = context.People.Create();
            var person2 = context.People.Create();

            var postalAddress           = context.PersonAddresses.Create();
            postalAddress.AddressLine1  = "PostalAddressLine1";

            var residentialAddress          =    context.PersonAddresses.Create();
            residentialAddress.AddressLine1 = "ResidentialAddressLine1";

            context.People.Add(person);
            context.People.Add(person2);

            person.PersonAddresses.Add(residentialAddress);
            person.PersonAddresses.Add(postalAddress);

            context.SaveChanges();
        }

Please see the EDMX below:

enter image description here

Please see SQL script used to create the two tables:

CREATE TABLE Person
(
   PersonId INT IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL CONSTRAINT [PK_Person] PRIMARY KEY,
   FirstName VARCHAR(250)
)

CREATE TABLE PersonAddress
(
   PersonAddressId INT IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL CONSTRAINT [PK_PersonAddress]     PRIMARY KEY,
  PersonId INT NOT NULL,
  AddressLine1 VARCHAR(250)
)

  ALTER TABLE PersonAddress
  ADD CONSTRAINT [FK_PersonAddress_Person] FOREIGN KEY(PersonId)
  REFERENCES [Person](PersonId)

Please see Id columns screenshots below: enter image description here enter image description here enter image description here

Please see SQL Server Profiler trace below:

Person:
enter image description here

PersonAddress:
enter image description here

PersonAddress:
enter image description here

Please see the inserted records in SQL:

Person:
enter image description here

PersonAddress:
enter image description here

Thanks.

  • No. EF does should not tie together both objects. Please post your DB model (specially definition of Person and PersonAddress) as this issue is probably caused by wrong DB model. – Kaspars Ozols Apr 8 '15 at 10:23
  • 1
    I don't see any good changes between first and second snippet that could solve the error (DbUpdateException) in the snippet. – Jenish Rabadiya Apr 8 '15 at 10:28
  • Can I post an image of the DB model as these are the only two tables? – Tjaart van der Walt Apr 8 '15 at 10:35
  • 1
    Jenish Rabadiya - Please see that in the last code snippet I call person.PersonAddresses.Add instead of context.PersonAddresses.Add( – Tjaart van der Walt Apr 8 '15 at 10:38
  • How are the IDs for PersonAddress generated? IDENTITY? – usr Apr 8 '15 at 11:05
3

Here's what happens:

var person = context.People.Create();

A Person is created having PersonId = 0.

var postalAddress           = context.PersonAddresses.Create();
postalAddress.AddressLine1  = "PostalAddressLine1";
var residentialAddress          = context.PersonAddresses.Create();
residentialAddress.AddressLine1 = "ResidentialAddressLine1";

Addresses are created, also having PersonId = 0.

context.People.Add(person);
context.PersonAddresses.Add(postalAddress);
context.PersonAddresses.Add(residentialAddress);

EF has executed relationship fixup, i.e. it has matched the addresses' PersonIds and the Person's PersonId (all 0) and established an association between them.

context.SaveChanges();

The database has assigned an identity value to Person.PersonId. EF read it back from the database into the entities.

In the second snippet there are two Persons having PersonId = 0, so now EF doesn't know which person to associate the addresses with.

What to do

Clearly, this is unexpected behavior. The best thing is to associate the entities explicitly, if they are intended to be related, as in your third snippet.

Once you know about these automatic associations you may want to prevent them by assigning a different default value to Person.PersonId other than 0, e.g. -1. Now EF won't match this id with any other foreign value having the default for integers, 0.

  • 1
    setting it -1 throws error insert conflicted.... that means it works. great answer! – Jenish Rabadiya Apr 9 '15 at 10:34
  • An answer to the always interesting question (that just cost me a couple of hours) "How did that ever work?" – Mark Peters Aug 8 '17 at 20:41
1

I have tested the scenario by creating a new project against a new database that I created with your script. I then generated a model against it leaving, all the defaults.

Here is the code I used to create the person and addresses.

        var entities = new TestEntities();

        var person = entities.People.Create();
        person.FirstName = "xxx";
        entities.People.Add(person);

        var address1 = entities.PersonAddresses.Create();
        address1.AddressLine1 = "Line1";
        entities.PersonAddresses.Add(address1);

        var address2 = entities.PersonAddresses.Create();
        address2.AddressLine1 = "Line1";
        entities.PersonAddresses.Add(address2);

        entities.SaveChanges();

I can confirm that this code does indeed run and insert a person and two addresses linked to that person. It definitely looks like EF wires it up if there is only one entity that it could possibly link to. I'm not sure if that is supposed to be a feature, but it can make for some nasty surprises.

  • I agree, this can lead to unwanted relationships being created. – Tjaart van der Walt Apr 9 '15 at 8:53
  • Interestingly, I tried it with a nullable PersonId on the Address. In this case the PersonId stays null. This makes me suspect even more that this is supposed to be a feature. – Johann Strydom Apr 9 '15 at 8:58
  • This does not provide answer to question. – Jenish Rabadiya Apr 9 '15 at 10:33
  • @JenishRabadiya The question was "Does Enityframework automatically add the related entities even though I have not specified the entity that it belongs to?". I answered " It definitely looks like EF wires it up if there is only one entity that it could possibly link to." I'm not sure why you think that doesn't answer the question. If the question was why EF does this it would be a different matter. – Johann Strydom Apr 9 '15 at 10:53
  • If that would have been the question it has already an answer in OP's post in question it does. First snippet works well. – Jenish Rabadiya Apr 9 '15 at 10:59
0

No EF cannot add automatically related entity if you are not specify what is the second entity, the reason is data integrity constraints in the database,hope this helps.

  • Well if EF does not do this automatically why does my first snippet of code work? – Tjaart van der Walt Apr 9 '15 at 8:05
  • As i see it didn't work, did you try to insert one object PersonAddresses ? – Hamzeh Wehbe Apr 9 '15 at 13:33
0

Here you attach the two person entities to the context

context.People.Add(person);
context.People.Add(person2);

And here you attach the two addresses to the first person entity

person.PersonAddresses.Add(residentialAddress);
person.PersonAddresses.Add(postalAddress);

So basically you tell the Entity Framework that you want to map the two addresses to the first person. If you do not do this, Entity Framework will not map them unless in the adresses you enter the personID manually

In your first code you only create person and addresses and attempt to add them to the database. There are no mapping between them and Entity Framework does not know of they should be linked.

  • The first snippet of code does work, EF links them up correctly. Please run the first snippet of code and you will see the result. – Tjaart van der Walt Apr 9 '15 at 8:15

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