8

How can I search for specific value in the registry keys?

For example I want to search for XXX in

HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Installer\Products

any code sample in C# will be appreciated,

thanks

19

In case you don't want to take a dependency on LogParser (as powerful as it is): I would take a look at the Microsoft.Win32.RegistryKey class (MSDN). Use OpenSubKey to open up HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Installer\Products, and then call GetSubKeyNames to, well, get the names of the subkeys.

Open up each of those in turn, call GetValue for the value you're interested in (ProductName, I guess) and compare the result to what you're looking for.

11

Help here...

Microsoft has a great (but not well known) tool for this - called LogParser

It uses a SQL engine to query all kind of text based data like the Registry, the Filesystem, the eventlog, AD etc... To be usable from C#, you need to build an Interop Assembly from the Logparser.dll COM server using following (adjust LogParser.dll path) command.

tlbimp "C:\Program Files\Log Parser 2.2\LogParser.dll"
/out:Interop.MSUtil.dll

Following is a small sample, that illustrates how to query for the Value 'VisualStudio' in the \HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft tree.

using System;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
using LogQuery = Interop.MSUtil.LogQueryClass;
using RegistryInputFormat = Interop.MSUtil.COMRegistryInputContextClass;
using RegRecordSet = Interop.MSUtil.ILogRecordset;

class Program
{
public static void Main()
{
RegRecordSet rs = null;
try
{
LogQuery qry = new LogQuery();
RegistryInputFormat registryFormat = new RegistryInputFormat();
string query = @"SELECT Path from \HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft where
Value='VisualStudio'";
rs = qry.Execute(query, registryFormat);
for(; !rs.atEnd(); rs.moveNext())
Console.WriteLine(rs.getRecord().toNativeString(","));
}
finally
{
rs.close();
}
}
}
1
  • this only looks into registry values, is there a way to search for registry key as well? i tried replacing Value with KeyName didn't work. Thanks – Prakash M Apr 17 '17 at 2:39
1

This method will search a specified registry key for the first subkey that contains a specified value. If the key is found then the specified value is returned. Searchign is only one level deep. If you require deeper searching then I suggest modifying this code to make use of recursion. Searching is case-sensitive but again you can modify that if required.

private string SearchKey(string keyname, string data, string valueToFind, string returnValue)
{
    RegistryKey uninstallKey = Registry.LocalMachine.OpenSubKey(keyname);
    var programs = uninstallKey.GetSubKeyNames();

    foreach (var program in programs)
    {
        RegistryKey subkey = uninstallKey.OpenSubKey(program);
        if (string.Equals(valueToFind, subkey.GetValue(data, string.Empty).ToString(), StringComparison.CurrentCulture))
        {
            return subkey.GetValue(returnValue).ToString();
        }
    }

    return string.Empty;
}

Example usage

// This code will find the version of Chrome (32 bit) installed
string version = this.SearchKey("SOFTWARE\\WOW6432Node\\Microsoft\\Windows\\CurrentVersion\\Uninstall", "DisplayName", "Google Chrome", "DisplayVersion");
0

@Caltor your solution gave me the answer I was looking for. I welcome improvements or a completely different solution that does not involve the registry. I am working with enterprise applications on Windows 10 with devices joined to Azure AD. I want/need to use Windows Hello for devices and for HoloLens 2 in a UWP app. My problem has been getting the AAD userPrincipal name from Windows 10. After a couple days searching and trying lots of code I searched the Windows Registry for my AAD account in the Current User key and found it. With some research it appears that this information is in a specific key. Because you can be joined to multiple directories there may be more than one entry. I was not trying to solve that issue, that is done with the AAD tenant Id. I just needed the AAD userPrincipal name. My solution de-dups the return list so that I have a list of unique userPrincipal names. App users may have to select an account, this is tolerable for even HoloLens.

using Microsoft.Win32;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

namespace WinReg
{
  public class WinRegistryUserFind
  {
    // Windows 10 apparently places Office/Azure AAD in the registry at this location
    // each login gets a unique key in the registry that ends with the aadrm.com and the values
    // are held in a key named Identities and the value we want is the Email data item.
    const string regKeyPath = "SOFTWARE\\Classes\\Local Settings\\Software\\Microsoft\\MSIPC";
    const string matchOnEnd = "aadrm.com";
    const string matchKey = "Identities";
    const string matchData = "Email";

    public static List<string> GetAADuserFromRegistry()
    {
      var usersFound = new List<string>();
      RegistryKey regKey = Registry.CurrentUser.OpenSubKey(regKeyPath);
      var programs = regKey.GetSubKeyNames();
      foreach (var program in programs)
      {
        RegistryKey subkey = regKey.OpenSubKey(program);
        if(subkey.Name.EndsWith(matchOnEnd))
        {
          var value = (subkey.OpenSubKey(matchKey) != null)? (string)subkey.OpenSubKey(matchKey).GetValue(matchData): string.Empty;
          if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(value)) continue;
          if((from user in usersFound where user == value select user).FirstOrDefault() == null)
            usersFound.Add(value) ;
        }
      }

      return usersFound;
    }
  }
}

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