int main() {
#pragma warning(push)
#pragma warning(disable: 4101)
    int i;
#pragma warning(pop)
}

########################### OR ###########################

int main() {
#pragma warning(suppress: 4101)
    int i;
}

I believe either of these should compile on Visual Studio 2013 with warnings treated as errors, with no C4101 warning (about I being an unreferenced local variable.) It's a level 4 warning.

But, it's still giving me the warning. Even if I turn off warnings treated as errors, it still gives me the warning, although then it compiles because there's no error.

I'm not using precompiled headers / stdafx.h. I saw some other questions saying this pragma technique would work around actual code (perhaps they meant code in headers but didn't specify or look like that). Some others vaguely saying without explanation any #pragma commands before stdafx.h would be ignored. But 'https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/d9x1s805(v=vs.120).aspx' specifically mentions pragma can be in source code to override compiler options. Granted, I've never used stdafx.h, being more a unix guy, so perhaps there's something totally fundamental I'm totally missing.

I've tried specifying C4101 instead of just 4101, and it can't handle an alpha in there. I've tried specifying #pragma warning(push 2) even though that would hit all level 3&4 level warnings which I don't want to do - and even that still gives the level 4 warning.

Here's my compiler command line options: /MP /GS /W4 /Zc:wchar_t /Zi /Gm- /Od /sdl /Fd"<...>\pragmaWarning\Intermediate\vc120.pdb" /fp:precise /errorReport:prompt /WX- /Zc:forScope /RTC1 /Gd /MDd /Fa"<...>\pragmaWarning\Intermediate\" /EHsc /nologo /Fo"<...>\pragmaWarning\Intermediate\" /Fp"<...>\pragmaWarning\Intermediate\pragmaWarning.pch"

As you may see, those command line options omit the warnings treated as errors.

  • That warning pragma might be function wide, meaning it applies to subsequent functions, not declarations. Maybe. – Mooing Duck Apr 9 '15 at 0:40
  • The whole stdafx thing is irrelevant to your problem, don't worry about it. – Mooing Duck Apr 9 '15 at 0:40
  • And, yes, I could remove the unreferenced local variable. And, yes, I could have a line of: "i;" Or have an unused_variable macro which does the same. And, yes, I could disable the particular warning for the entire project. But, I'm more looking for a fix for those rare and few situations where you explicitly want to turn off a warning for a specific line(s) but have it on for everything else. – user1902689 Apr 9 '15 at 0:40
  • 5
    Some warnings are scoped to the function and not a code line, C4101 is one of them. You need to disable it outside the function scope. Note that suppress only applies to the next physical line in the file. – Chuck Walbourn Apr 9 '15 at 0:46
  • 1
    Chuck got it! If I move push & disable before the function and pop after the function, it works fine. And, using just suppress doesn't work like you're saying just the next physical line. How can you tell whether a warning is scoped to a function, a line of code, or something else? 'msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/c733d5h9.aspx' (The documentation on VS2013 C4101) doesn't specify. – user1902689 Apr 9 '15 at 0:51
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Some warnings are 'function scope' and cannot be suppressed by using #pragma warning(suppress: 4101). They also, as you have noted, cannot be disabled by just doing it around the specific line. You must disable this warning for the whole function:

#pragma warning(push)
#pragma warning(disable: 4101)
int main() {
    int i;
}
#pragma warning(pop)

Note also that for warnings that are specific to a line rather than a scope, the use of #pragma warning(suppress: xxx) is specific to the next actual line in the file.

I agree, #pragma warning(suppress: 4101) should do it.

Q: Why not try #pragma warning(disable: 4101)?

Or

#pragma warning(push)
#pragma warning(disable: 4101)
    int i;
    ... more code ...
#pragma warning(pop)

Here's the Microsoft documentation:

https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/2c8f766e.aspx

  • Sorry, I had two blocks of code in my original post I had tried that I probably could have separated better. I'll go make the separation clearer. One of them is identical to this, still causing the warning. – user1902689 Apr 9 '15 at 0:46

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