852

How can I write a here document to a file in Bash script?

1
1262

Read the Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide Chapter 19. Here Documents.

Here's an example which will write the contents to a file at /tmp/yourfilehere

cat << EOF > /tmp/yourfilehere
These contents will be written to the file.
        This line is indented.
EOF

Note that the final 'EOF' (The LimitString) should not have any whitespace in front of the word, because it means that the LimitString will not be recognized.

In a shell script, you may want to use indentation to make the code readable, however this can have the undesirable effect of indenting the text within your here document. In this case, use <<- (followed by a dash) to disable leading tabs (Note that to test this you will need to replace the leading whitespace with a tab character, since I cannot print actual tab characters here.)

#!/usr/bin/env bash

if true ; then
    cat <<- EOF > /tmp/yourfilehere
    The leading tab is ignored.
    EOF
fi

If you don't want to interpret variables in the text, then use single quotes:

cat << 'EOF' > /tmp/yourfilehere
The variable $FOO will not be interpreted.
EOF

To pipe the heredoc through a command pipeline:

cat <<'EOF' |  sed 's/a/b/'
foo
bar
baz
EOF

Output:

foo
bbr
bbz

... or to write the the heredoc to a file using sudo:

cat <<'EOF' |  sed 's/a/b/' | sudo tee /etc/config_file.conf
foo
bar
baz
EOF
13
  • 15
    You don't even need Bash, this feature is in the Bourne/Korn/POSIX shells too. May 1 '13 at 17:24
  • 7
    what about <<<, what are they called? Nov 28 '13 at 8:14
  • 21
    @PineappleUndertheSea <<< are called 'Here Strings'. Code like tr a-z A-Z <<< 'one two three' will result in the string ONE TWO THREE. More information at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Here_document#Here_strings Dec 9 '13 at 18:03
  • 10
    The final EOF should not have any whitespace after it either. At least on bash, this results in it being unrecognised as the delimiter
    – carpii
    Jul 12 '15 at 13:43
  • 10
    Since this particular heredoc is intended to be literal content, rather than containing substitutions, it should be <<'EOF' rather than <<EOF. May 27 '16 at 16:13
177

Instead of using cat and I/O redirection it might be useful to use tee instead:

tee newfile <<EOF
line 1
line 2
line 3
EOF

It's more concise, plus unlike the redirect operator it can be combined with sudo if you need to write to files with root permissions.

6
  • 25
    I'd suggest adding > /dev/null at the end of the first line to prevent the contents of the here file being displayed to stdout when it's created. Jun 19 '13 at 12:50
  • 11
    True, but your solution appealed to me because of its compatibility with sudo, rather than because of its brevity :-) Jun 24 '13 at 13:32
  • 2
    How would you use this method to append to an existing file?
    – MountainX
    Jul 21 '13 at 4:09
  • 7
    @MountainX Check out man tee. Use the -a flag to append instead of overwrite.
    – Livven
    Jul 23 '13 at 17:47
  • 3
    For use in a config script that I sometimes need to oversee, I like this one more because it prints the contents. Jul 29 '13 at 18:12
70

Note:

The question (how to write a here document (aka heredoc) to a file in a bash script?) has (at least) 3 main independent dimensions or subquestions:

  1. Do you want to overwrite an existing file, append to an existing file, or write to a new file?
  2. Does your user or another user (e.g., root) own the file?
  3. Do you want to write the contents of your heredoc literally, or to have bash interpret variable references inside your heredoc?

(There are other dimensions/subquestions which I don't consider important. Consider editing this answer to add them!) Here are some of the more important combinations of the dimensions of the question listed above, with various different delimiting identifiers--there's nothing sacred about EOF, just make sure that the string you use as your delimiting identifier does not occur inside your heredoc:

  1. To overwrite an existing file (or write to a new file) that you own, substituting variable references inside the heredoc:

    cat << EOF > /path/to/your/file
    This line will write to the file.
    ${THIS} will also write to the file, with the variable contents substituted.
    EOF
    
  2. To append an existing file (or write to a new file) that you own, substituting variable references inside the heredoc:

    cat << FOE >> /path/to/your/file
    This line will write to the file.
    ${THIS} will also write to the file, with the variable contents substituted.
    FOE
    
  3. To overwrite an existing file (or write to a new file) that you own, with the literal contents of the heredoc:

    cat << 'END_OF_FILE' > /path/to/your/file
    This line will write to the file.
    ${THIS} will also write to the file, without the variable contents substituted.
    END_OF_FILE
    
  4. To append an existing file (or write to a new file) that you own, with the literal contents of the heredoc:

    cat << 'eof' >> /path/to/your/file
    This line will write to the file.
    ${THIS} will also write to the file, without the variable contents substituted.
    eof
    
  5. To overwrite an existing file (or write to a new file) owned by root, substituting variable references inside the heredoc:

    cat << until_it_ends | sudo tee /path/to/your/file
    This line will write to the file.
    ${THIS} will also write to the file, with the variable contents substituted.
    until_it_ends
    
  6. To append an existing file (or write to a new file) owned by user=foo, with the literal contents of the heredoc:

    cat << 'Screw_you_Foo' | sudo -u foo tee -a /path/to/your/file
    This line will write to the file.
    ${THIS} will also write to the file, without the variable contents substituted.
    Screw_you_Foo
    
5
  • #6 is best. But how do you overwrite contents of existing file with #6? Apr 21 '15 at 13:47
  • 2
    @Aleksandr Makov: how do you overwrite contents of existing file with #6? Omit the -a == --append; i.e., tee -a -> tee. See info tee (I'd quote it here, but comment markup is too limited.
    – TomRoche
    Apr 22 '15 at 19:03
  • 1
    Is there a benefit to #6 using cat and piping to tee instead of sudo tee /path/to/your/file << 'Screw_you_Foo'?
    – codemonkee
    Mar 10 '17 at 1:27
  • Why FOE instead of EOF in the append example?
    – becko
    Aug 6 '18 at 8:47
  • 3
    @becko: just to illustrate that the label is just a label. Note that I used a different label in each example.
    – TomRoche
    Sep 1 '18 at 22:01
54

To build on @Livven's answer, here are some useful combinations.

  1. variable substitution, leading tab retained, overwrite file, echo to stdout

    tee /path/to/file <<EOF
    ${variable}
    EOF
    
  2. no variable substitution, leading tab retained, overwrite file, echo to stdout

    tee /path/to/file <<'EOF'
    ${variable}
    EOF
    
  3. variable substitution, leading tab removed, overwrite file, echo to stdout

    tee /path/to/file <<-EOF
        ${variable}
    EOF
    
  4. variable substitution, leading tab retained, append to file, echo to stdout

    tee -a /path/to/file <<EOF
    ${variable}
    EOF
    
  5. variable substitution, leading tab retained, overwrite file, no echo to stdout

    tee /path/to/file <<EOF >/dev/null
    ${variable}
    EOF
    
  6. the above can be combined with sudo as well

    sudo -u USER tee /path/to/file <<EOF
    ${variable}
    EOF
    
18

When root permissions are required

When root permissions are required for the destination file, use |sudo tee instead of >:

cat << 'EOF' |sudo tee /tmp/yourprotectedfilehere
The variable $FOO will *not* be interpreted.
EOF

cat << "EOF" |sudo tee /tmp/yourprotectedfilehere
The variable $FOO *will* be interpreted.
EOF
4
  • Is it possible to pass variables to here documents? How could you get it so $FOO was interpreted? Jul 24 '14 at 17:03
  • Below I have attempted to combine and organize this answer with that of Stefan Lasiewski.
    – TomRoche
    Sep 18 '14 at 18:32
  • 4
    @user1527227 Just don't enclose EOF in single quotes. Then $FOO will be interpreted.
    – imnd_neel
    Feb 1 '17 at 8:46
  • You can also use | sudo cat > instead of | sudo tee if you don't want the input to be printed back to the stdout again. Of course, now you're using cat twice and doubly invoking that "unnecessary use of cat" meme, probably.
    – user457586
    Feb 19 at 22:43
12

For future people who may have this issue the following format worked:

(cat <<- _EOF_
        LogFile /var/log/clamd.log
        LogTime yes
        DatabaseDirectory /var/lib/clamav
        LocalSocket /tmp/clamd.socket
        TCPAddr 127.0.0.1
        SelfCheck 1020
        ScanPDF yes
        _EOF_
) > /etc/clamd.conf
5
  • 6
    Don't need the parentheses: cat << END > afile followed by the heredoc works perfectly well. Jun 2 '10 at 0:12
  • Thanks, this actually solved another issue I ran into. After a few here docs there was some issues. I think it had to do with the parens, as with the advice above it fixed it. Jun 7 '10 at 17:53
  • 2
    This won't work. The output redirection needs to be at the end of the line which starts with cat as shown in the accepted answer. May 1 '13 at 20:07
  • 2
    @DennisWilliamson It works, that's what the parens are for. The whole cat runs inside a subshell, and all the output of the subshell is redirected to the file
    – Izkata
    Aug 15 '15 at 6:45
  • 2
    @Izkata: If you look at the edit history of this answer, the parentheses were removed before I made my comment and added back afterwards. glenn jackman's (and my) comment applies. Aug 15 '15 at 10:21
3

As instance you could use it:

First(making ssh connection):

while read pass port user ip files directs; do
    sshpass -p$pass scp -o 'StrictHostKeyChecking no' -P $port $files $user@$ip:$directs
done <<____HERE
    PASS    PORT    USER    IP    FILES    DIRECTS
      .      .       .       .      .         .
      .      .       .       .      .         .
      .      .       .       .      .         .
    PASS    PORT    USER    IP    FILES    DIRECTS
____HERE

Second(executing commands):

while read pass port user ip; do
    sshpass -p$pass ssh -p $port $user@$ip <<ENDSSH1
    COMMAND 1
    .
    .
    .
    COMMAND n
ENDSSH1
done <<____HERE
    PASS    PORT    USER    IP
      .      .       .       .
      .      .       .       .
      .      .       .       .
    PASS    PORT    USER    IP    
____HERE

Third(executing commands):

Script=$'
#Your commands
'

while read pass port user ip; do
    sshpass -p$pass ssh -o 'StrictHostKeyChecking no' -p $port $user@$ip "$Script"

done <<___HERE
PASS    PORT    USER    IP
  .      .       .       .
  .      .       .       .
  .      .       .       .
PASS    PORT    USER    IP  
___HERE

Forth(using variables):

while read pass port user ip fileoutput; do
    sshpass -p$pass ssh -o 'StrictHostKeyChecking no' -p $port $user@$ip fileinput=$fileinput 'bash -s'<<ENDSSH1
    #Your command > $fileinput
    #Your command > $fileinput
ENDSSH1
done <<____HERE
    PASS    PORT    USER    IP      FILE-OUTPUT
      .      .       .       .          .
      .      .       .       .          .
      .      .       .       .          .
    PASS    PORT    USER    IP      FILE-OUTPUT
____HERE
0

I like this method for concision, readability and presentation in an indented script:

<<-End_of_file >file
→       foo bar
End_of_file

Where →        is a tab character.

0

If you want to keep the heredoc indented for readability:

$ perl -pe 's/^\s*//' << EOF
     line 1
     line 2
EOF

The built-in method for supporting indented heredoc in Bash only supports leading tabs, not spaces.

Perl can be replaced with awk to save a few characters, but the Perl one is probably easier to remember if you know basic regular expressions.

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