54

Handling integer overflow is a common task, but what's the best way to handle it in C#? Is there some syntactic sugar to make it simpler than with other languages? Or is this really the best way?

int x = foo();
int test = x * common;
if(test / common != x)
    Console.WriteLine("oh noes!");
else
    Console.WriteLine("safe!");
2
  • 5
    best way is to prevent in first place Commented Jun 2, 2010 at 4:14
  • 12
    Sure, but that's a different question from the one presented here. Handling it and preventing it are seperate (related of course) discussions.
    – dreadwail
    Commented Jun 2, 2010 at 4:16

6 Answers 6

121

I haven't needed to use this often, but you can use the checked keyword:

int x = foo();
int test = checked(x * common);

Will result in a runtime exception if overflows. From MSDN:

In a checked context, if an expression produces a value that is outside the range of the destination type, the result depends on whether the expression is constant or non-constant. Constant expressions cause compile time errors, while non-constant expressions are evaluated at run time and raise exceptions.

I should also point out that there is another C# keyword, unchecked, which of course does the opposite of checked and ignores overflows. You might wonder when you'd ever use unchecked since it appears to be the default behavior. Well, there is a C# compiler option that defines how expressions outside of checked and unchecked are handled: /checked. You can set it under the advanced build settings of your project.

If you have a lot of expressions that need to be checked, the simplest thing to do would actually be to set the /checked build option. Then any expression that overflows, unless wrapped in unchecked, would result in a runtime exception.

6
  • 3
    Why is the default behavior is unchecked? Is there any performance concerns on using checked?
    – KFL
    Commented Nov 5, 2013 at 1:44
  • 3
    @KFL "Because checking for overflow takes time, the use of unchecked code in situations where there is no danger of overflow might improve performance. However, if overflow is a possibility, a checked environment should be used." See msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/a569z7k8.aspx. I also believe that the default is unchecked because it parallels the C / C++ behavior. Commented Nov 5, 2013 at 1:55
  • 1
    There are cases where overflow is useful, for instance the TCP sequence number. An unsigned int just wraps around to zero, so all that's needed is the increment operator.
    – user472308
    Commented Sep 25, 2014 at 18:03
  • Does unchecked produce same results in case of overflow on all machines??
    – user5528169
    Commented Dec 10, 2015 at 12:00
  • Updated url reference for 'checked' - msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/74b4xzyw(v=vs.140).aspx Commented Jul 23, 2016 at 4:06
22

Try the following

int x = foo();
try {
  int test = checked (x * common);
  Console.WriteLine("safe!");
} catch (OverflowException) {
  Console.WriteLine("oh noes!");
}
8

The best way is as Micheal Said - use Checked keyword. This can be done as :

int x = int.MaxValue;
try   
{
    checked
    {
        int test = x * 2;
        Console.WriteLine("No Overflow!");
    }
}
catch (OverflowException ex)
{
   Console.WriteLine("Overflow Exception caught as: " + ex.ToString());
}
1
  • You need to format your code (insert 4 spaces prior to it and the site will automatically pick up the formatting and syntax highlighting.
    – dreadwail
    Commented Jun 2, 2010 at 19:30
6

Sometimes, the simplest way is the best way. I can't think a better way to write what you wrote, but you can short it to:

int x = foo();

if ((x * common) / common != x)
    Console.WriteLine("oh noes!");
else
    Console.WriteLine("safe!");

Note that I didn't remove the x variable because it'd be foolish to call the foo() three times.

3
  • 1
    Now I wonder if the compiler would ever optimize that expression away entirely? Commented Jun 2, 2010 at 4:49
  • 3
    USefull, unless of course you are planning on using the result (x*common), in that case your shortening would require the calculation to be done twice ...
    – Cobusve
    Commented Jun 2, 2010 at 8:56
  • 1
    What if common == 0?
    – Neil
    Commented Jan 6 at 6:43
4

Old thread, but I just ran into this. I didn't want to use exceptions. What I ended up with was:

long a = (long)b * (long)c;
if(a>int.MaxValue || a<int.MinValue)
    do whatever you want with the overflow
return((int)a);
2
  • 1
    This won't work. int.MaxValue + 1 gives you -2147483648 or int.MinValue. so a can never be larger than MaxValue or smaller than MinValue. Think of numbers as a line like this: -2147483648, -2147483647, ... 0 ... 2147483646, 2147483647 when you go over the max value, it flows back to the smallest.
    – Ray Cheng
    Commented Apr 8, 2015 at 23:23
  • 7
    you missed the fact that he/she converted to long before checking against the bounds of the int. so it would work as long it doesnt overflow the long.
    – hammett
    Commented Jan 6, 2016 at 4:52
0

So, I ran into this far after the fact, and it mostly answered my question, but for my particular case (in the event anyone else has the same requirements), I wanted anything that would overflow the positive value of a signed int to just settle at int.MaxValue:

int x = int.MaxValue - 3;
int someval = foo();

try
{
   x += someval;
}

catch (OverflowException)
{
   x = int.MaxValue;
}
1
  • 2
    The exception wouldn't get thrown unless you compile with /checked, or use the checked keyword, correct?
    – Paul Knopf
    Commented Dec 13, 2016 at 13:38

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