I'm attempting to make a sort of circular buffer in C. Here is what I have right now.

#include <stdio.h>
#define ORDER 3
#define LENGTH 7

short input[LENGTH] = {1,2,3,4,5,6,7};
short buff[ORDER] = {0,0,0};
short pos = 0;

void filter(short input, short *buff, short *pos) {
    short p = *pos;       
    if (p==ORDER) {
        p=0;
    }
    p++; 
   *(buff+p) = input;
    printf("%d %d %d (%d)\n",*(buff+p),*(buff+p-1),*(buff+p-2),p);      
    *pos = p;    
}

void main() {
    short i;
    for (i=0;i<LENGTH;i++) {
        filter(input[i],buff,&pos);
    }
}

This outputs:

1 0 0 (1)
2 1 0 (2)
3 2 1 (3)
4 0 3 (1)
5 4 0 (2)
6 5 4 (3)
7 0 3 (1)

However, I'm trying to get it to output:

1 0 0 (1)
2 1 0 (2)
3 2 1 (3)
4 3 2 (1)
5 4 3 (2)
6 5 4 (3)
7 6 5 (1)

Basically the numbers are getting shifted over by one each time. I'm pretty sure I'm close but I can't seem to make this happen.

  • 1
    You have a few obvious problems... 1. *pos <-- you are dereferencing a short.. dont do that. 2. input <-- you have two of these.. lets try some new names. – Hashtag Apr 10 '15 at 2:26
  • 1
    Your program exhibits undefined behavior whenever main() calls filter() while pos % ORDER == 0, for then filter() ends up trying to evaluate *(buff - 1) as the last printf() argument. This is an out of bounds array access. It looks like these cases may be correlated with the misbehavior. – John Bollinger Apr 10 '15 at 2:28
  • Oh, right.. John is correct. (I was just confused due to your naming.. pos was a pointer). This should probably fix it: printf("%d %d %d (%d)\n",*(buff+(p%ORDER)),*(buff+(p+2%ORDER)),*(buff+(p+1%ORDER)),p); – Hashtag Apr 10 '15 at 2:32
up vote 0 down vote accepted
void filter(short input, short *buff, short *pos) {
    short p = *pos;       
    if (p==ORDER) {
        p=0;
    }
   *(buff+p) = input;
    printf("%hd %hd %hd (%hd)\n", buff[p],buff[p-1<0 ? p-1+ORDER : p-1],buff[p-2<0 ? p-2+ORDER : p-2], p+1);
    //printf("%hd %hd %hd (%hd)\n",buff[p],buff[(p-1+ORDER)%ORDER],buff[(p-2+ORDER)%ORDER], p+1);

    *pos = ++p;    
}

You are complicating things a lot. Try using the modulo operator instead of juggling pointers.

short pos = 0;
short buff[ORDER];

void filter(short input) {
    buff[pos] = input;
    short second = (pos - 1) % ORDER;
    short third = (pos - 2) % ORDER;
    printf("%d %d %d (%d)\n", buff[pos], buff[second], buff[third], p);
    pos = (pos + 1) % ORDER;
}

This could be simplified down to this:

void filter(short input, short *buff, short *pos) {
    buf[*pos] = input;
    printf("%d %d %d (%d)\n",buff[*pos],buff[(*pos+2)%ORDER],buff[(*pos+1)%ORDER],*pos);
    (++(*pos)) %= ORDER;
}

I would just pass to filter a pointer to the input and the index you want to start at

void filter(short * input, short* pos){
    int i;
    for(i = *pos;i<ORDER;i--){
        printf("%d ",input[i] % ORDER);
    }
    printf("(%d) \n",*pos);
    *pos = (*pos + 1) % ORDER;
}

and call it like

filter(input,&pos);

Using a loop allows you to change the value of order at any point and print any range of values.

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