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I currently have a MySQL table that is structured as follows:

id         name     lon            lat  
-----      -----    -----------    -----------
1          Mark     -76.316528     40.036027
2          John     -95.995102     41.25716
3          Paul     -82.337036     29.645095
4          Dave     -82.337036     29.645095
5          Chris    -76.316528     40.036027

The way I currently query the DB to see if a user's location is within a certain mile radius of a given location is by doing this.

function Haversine($lat_from, $lon_from, $lat_to, $lon_to) {
    $radius = 6371000;
    $delta_lat = deg2rad($lat_to-$lat_from);
    $delta_lon = deg2rad($lon_to-$lon_from);

    $a = sin($delta_lat/2) * sin($delta_lat/2) +
        cos(deg2rad($lat_from)) * cos(deg2rad($lat_to)) *
        sin($delta_lon/2) * sin($delta_lon/2);
    $c = 2*atan2(sqrt($a), sqrt(1-$a));

    // Convert the distance from meters to miles
    return ceil(($radius*$c)*0.000621371);
}

// Set the given location to NYC
$my_lon = -73.9844;
$my_lat = 40.7590;

// Query the DB for all of the users
$sql = "SELECT * FROM users";
$result = mysqli_query($con, $sql)or die(mysqli_error($con));
$count = mysqli_num_rows($result);
$i = 0;

while($row = mysqli_fetch_assoc($result)) {
    $lon[$i] = $row['lon'];
    $lat[$i] = $row['lat'];

    $i++;
}

for($i=0;$i<$count;$i++) {
    // Calculate the distance between each user's location and my location
    $distance = Haversine($my_lat, $my_lon, $lat[$i], $lon[$i);

    if($distance < 50) {
        echo "Close enough";
    }
}

This works well with only a few hundred rows in the table. But, now that I have tens of thousands of rows, checking so many rows has proven to be very time consuming. I'm wondering if there is a way to use the Haversine formula to only query rows that are within the 50 mile radius.

1
  • If you don't need an exact radius, just calculate a bounding box (top left and bottom right corners) with your location at the middle, then do something like WHERE latitude BETWEEN $min AND $max. Feb 26, 2020 at 0:36

1 Answer 1

63

Spherical Law of Cosines Formula
(37 and -122 are the latitude and longitude of your radius center)

SELECT id, ( 3959 * acos( cos( radians(37) ) * cos( radians( lat ) ) 
    * cos( radians( long ) - radians(-122) ) + sin( radians(37) ) * sin(radians(lat)) ) ) AS distance 
FROM myTable
HAVING distance < 50
ORDER BY distance 

Features

  • Fastest
  • Precision similar to Harvesine Formula

Haversine Formula

SELECT id, 3959 * 2 * ASIN(SQRT(POWER(SIN((37 - abs(lat)) * pi()/180 / 2), 2)
       + COS(37 * pi()/180 ) * COS(abs(lat) * pi()/180)
       * POWER(SIN((-122 - long) * pi()/180 / 2), 2) )) as  distance
FROM myTable
HAVING distance < 50
ORDER BY distance

Features

  • Fast
  • More robust to floating point errors

Note that 3959 is the Earth radius in miles. Earth radius in kilometres (km): 6371

You can find more information here

2
  • Hi, can you explain how you got 37, -122? I understand it's the radius center but how are you getting the number? Can you also explain what lat and lon represent in the query? Is it the lat, lon you're providing to the query or the lat lon of the records in the table? Jun 2, 2021 at 3:08
  • @Last_Node_Standing 37 and -127 are the center coordinates of the circle. 50 is the circle radius
    – vimuth
    Jun 3, 2021 at 20:38

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