1

If we're finding the no. of factors of a number, we can use the following efficient loop. for(i=1;i<=sqrt(n);i++), where n is the 'no' whose factors are to be found. This loop would have a complexity of O(n).

What would be the time complexity of the below code snippet? (Assume that log(x) returns log value in base 2). O(n^2) or O (n logn)? (I assume that log n is the complexity when the loop divides by two. ie. i/=2)

void fun()
{
    int i,j;
    for(i=1;i<=n;i++)
        for(j=1;j<=log(i);j++)
            printf("hello world");
}
  • 1
    Yes, homework is fun :-) – Thorsten Dittmar Apr 10 '15 at 8:34
  • In Stack Overflow we expect people to put some effort into their work, before asking for help. And to explain what have they tried to solve the problem. – Dialecticus Apr 10 '15 at 8:39
3

The actual number of "Hello world" prints in your code is:

You can then use the Srinivasa Ramanujan approximation of log(n!):

To get the actual complexity of the whole code, which is O(n logn)

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  • I assume that log n is the complexity when the loop divides by two. ie. i/=2 – TheHardRock Apr 11 '15 at 11:35
  • Yes, a for loop like for (i=1; i<=n; i*=2) or for (i=n; i>=1; i/=2) runs in O(logn), but there is no such loop in your question. Here the logn term comes from the j<=log(i) condition in the second loop. – BlackDwarf Apr 12 '15 at 12:37
  • but as I wrote in the first three lines that that program's complexity would be O(n) even after the loop runs sqrt(n) times. So how does log n term come after j<=log(i) in place of O(n) as in the previous case? – TheHardRock Apr 12 '15 at 18:13
  • Well I'm afraid I don't get what you mean, neither do I get the link between the "find the factors of a number" problem and the code snippet you provided... And if saying that the loop for(i=1;i<=sqrt(n);i++) complexity is O(n) is true, it actually runs in O(sqrt(n)) – BlackDwarf Apr 12 '15 at 19:19
0

The inner loop calls printf approximately log(i) times, for i in range [1..n]. The total number of calls is approximately

log(1)+log(2)+log(3)+...log(n) = log(n!)

Now, the Stirling asymptotic formula will give you the solution.


For the base 2 logarithm, the exact count is given by

0 + 1 + 1 + 2 + 2 + 2 + 2 + 3 + 3 + 3 + 3 + 3 + 3 + 3 + 3 + ... + floor(Lg(n))

or

1.0 + 2.1 + 4.2 + 8.3 + ... + k.floor(Lg(n))

For convenience, assume that n is of the form n=2^m-1, so that the last run is complete (and k=2^(m-1)).

Now take the sum of x^k from 0 to m-1, which equals (x^m-1)/(x-1) and derive on x to get the sum of x^k.k. Evaluating for x=2, you get

s = m.2^m-2^m+2 = (n+1).Lg(n+1)-n+1

For other n, you need to add a correction term for the last partial run. With m=floor(Lg(n+1)):

t = m.(n+1-2.2^m)
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0

An upper bound of O(n*Log(n)) can be proven without any math.

void fun()
{
   int i,j;
   for(i=1;i<=n;i++)
       for(j=1;j<=log(n);j++)    // << notice I changed "i" to "n" 
           printf("hello world");
}

The above function will run N times the inner loop, and the inner loop will run log(N) times.

Hence, the function will run exactly nLog(n) times.

Since this function

 (log(n) + log(n) + ... + log(n)) // n times 

is larger than the OP version

(log(1) + log(2) + ... + log(n))

Then it is an upper bound of the original version.

<= O(n log(n)

comment

also

(log(n) + log(n) + ... + log(n)) // n times
= log(n^n)
= n*log(n)
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0

j is dependent on j, therefore unroll the dependency, means analyze for i only

if i=1 ----> inner loop executes log(1) times

if i=2 ----> inner loop executes log(2) times

if i=3 ----> inner loop executes log(3) times

.

.

if i=n ----> inner loop executes log(n) times.

combine them ==> log(1)+log(2)+.....+log(n) = log ( 1.2.3...n ) = log ( n! ) = n log(n)

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