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I am trying to brush up a bit on my understanding of binary trees and in particular binary search trees. Looking through the wikipedia showed me the following information (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_search_tree):

"Binary search trees keep their keys in sorted order, so that lookup and other operations can use the principle of binary search: when looking for a key in a tree (or a place to insert a new key), they traverse the tree from root to leaf, making comparisons to keys stored in the nodes of the tree and deciding, based on the comparison, to continue searching in the left or right subtrees. On average, this means that each comparison allows the operations to skip over half of the tree, so that each lookup/insertion/deletion takes time proportional to the logarithm of the number of items stored in the tree. This is much better than the linear time required to find items by key in an unsorted array, but slower than the corresponding operations on hash tables."

Can someone please elaborate / explain the following portions of that description:

1) "On average, this means that each comparison allows the operations to skip over half of the tree, so that each lookup/insertion/deletion takes time proportional to the logarithm of the number of items stored in the tree."

2) [from the last sentence] "...but slower than the corresponding operations on hash tables."

  • Ugh, the text in (1) is really poorly phrased. I would suggest another reference. – David Eisenstat Apr 10 '15 at 15:26
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1) "On average" is only applicable if the BST is balanced, i.e. the left and right subtree contain a rougly equal number of nodes. This makes searching an O(log n) operation, because on each iteration you can roughly discard half of the remaining items.

2) On hash tables, searching, insertion and deletion all take expected O(1) time.

  • Can you explain your response to 1 a little further. Why is discarding half the operations leading to O(log n) instead of O(n/2) = O(n) – djfkdjfkd39939 Apr 11 '15 at 4:45
  • Because it's recursive: every node is balanced. With each node you compare your value to, you can discard roughly half of the remaining values, because you know they're larger/smaller than the value you're looking for. – Jordi Vermeulen Apr 11 '15 at 8:48

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