2

I was given this algorithm to convert into pseudo-code:

Name[1] = 'Ben'
Name[2] = 'Thor'
Name[3] = 'Zoe'
Name[4] = 'Kate'
Max <- 4
Current <- 1
Found <- False
OUTPUT 'What player are you looking for?'
INPUT PlayerName
WHILE (Found = False) AND (Current <= Max)
    IF Names[Current] = PlayerName
        THEN Found <- True
        ELSE Current <- Current + 1
    ENDIF
ENDWHILE
IF Found = True
    THEN OUTPUT 'Yes, they have a top score'
    ELSE OUTPUT 'No, they do not have a top score'
ENDIF

So I converted it to Python like so:

def Names():
    list = ['Ben', 'Thor', 'Zoe', 'Kate']
    Max = 4
    Current = 1
    Found = False
    PlayerName = str(input("What Player are you looking for? "))
    while (Found == False) and (Current <= Max):
        if Names(Current) == PlayerName:
            Found = True
        else:
            Current = Current + 1
        if Found == True:
            print("Yes, they have a top score.")
        else:
            print("No, they do not have a top score.")

But an error comes up saying:

'TypeError: Names() takes 0 positional arguments but 1 was given'

Where did I go wrong?

5
  • Can you give the error code that was returned to you? Did you try running the function?
    – Zizouz212
    Commented Apr 10, 2015 at 18:00
  • It looks like the error is occurring where you call the Names() function. Could you show us that part?
    – derricw
    Commented Apr 10, 2015 at 18:00
  • 1
    You passed Current to your function Names(). But Names() wasn't made to take any inputs.
    – logic
    Commented Apr 10, 2015 at 18:00
  • 2
    You seem to be confusing Names the function with Names a list (I'm guessing this is supposed to be a list) can you rename your variables, plus I think you want to use square brackets e.g. Names[Current]
    – EdChum
    Commented Apr 10, 2015 at 18:01
  • Also don't use a variable name of list use name_list or similar, you should in fact be using that instead of Names(Curent) -> name_list[Current]
    – EdChum
    Commented Apr 10, 2015 at 18:02

3 Answers 3

4

Let's analyze the error you got:

'TypeError: Names() takes 0 positional arguments but 1 was given'

It says, the function you made, called Names(), takes zero arguments but you gave it one argument.

In your code this can be seen when you use Names(Current) inside your function Names(). This is, in effect, calling the function again, so you inadvertently wrote a recursive function which you didn't want.

What you wanted to do was to check the list of names to see if any name matches the name inputted by the user.

To do this, instead of a while-loop, use a for-loop. This way, you wouldn't have to specifically state the start and ending points of the list and you could add additional names if you so chose.

This is how your conversion should look like:

def Names():
    names_list= ['Ben', 'Thor', 'Zoe', 'Kate']
    Found = False
    PlayerName = str(raw_input("What Player are you looking for? "))
    for name in names_list:
        if name == PlayerName:
            Found = True

    if Found == True:   #place this if-else outside your for-loop
        print("Yes, they have a top score.")
    else:
        print("No, they do not have a top score.")


Names()

This would output:

>>>
What Player are you looking for? Thor
Yes, they have a top score.

>>>
What Player are you looking for? Bob
No, they do not have a top score.
3
  • Everything works great and thanks for the explanation. Only one problem. When it does output the answer, it outputs the answer for each one of the names, but it has to output an answer just for the name the user has typed in. Commented Apr 10, 2015 at 18:28
  • @Filip You'd just have to take the if-else outside of the loop. See edit.
    – logic
    Commented Apr 10, 2015 at 18:37
  • @Filip No prob :) Please consider check-marking an answer on the left if we solved your problem
    – logic
    Commented Apr 10, 2015 at 19:07
1

You're getting a type error because you are trying to pass arguments to your Names function. Names doesn't accept any arguments, because there is nothing listed there. You either need to call the function without arguments, or add a parameter to the brackets when declaring the Names function. Also, the variables that are local to a function can't be accessed from the outside, unless they are returned. So don't do this:

Names["Something"] == Another_Thing

But, instead pass what you need your function to spit out as a parameter. If you need to access everything in there globally, don't define everything inside a function, but rather outside it, and pass everything that you are trying to do as parameters to the function.

def Names(A_Parameter, Another_Parameter, A_Default_Parameter = Some_Default):
    # do something
2
  • OP didn't do Names["Something"] == Another_Thing. You were answering the question based off the pseudo-code but his error was a result of the Python code which is at the bottom on the question. There OP mistakenly called Names(Current). That's what gave the error.
    – logic
    Commented Apr 10, 2015 at 19:02
  • @logic I listed that too... The issue there was the absence of formal parameters.
    – Zizouz212
    Commented Apr 10, 2015 at 19:05
1

@logic has a solution, but it can be simplified. No need for str, for loop, or Found variable.

def Names():
    names_list = ['Ben', 'Thor', 'Zoe', 'Kate']
    PlayerName = raw_input("What Player are you looking for? ")
    if PlayerName in names_list:
        print "Yes, they have a top score."
    else:
        print "No, they do not have a top score."

Names()

print in Python 2.x also should not have parentheses. It doesn't matter in the above case, but would with the following:

PlayerName = "Ben"
print("Name:",PlayerName)
print "Name:",PlayerName

Output:

('Name:', 'Ben')
Name: Ben
4
  • "print in Python 2.x also should not have parentheses" - is that really true? Or is it more "print in Python 2.x does not need parentheses"? Commented Apr 10, 2015 at 20:56
  • OK - for others like me who couldn't see the difference, print("Name:",PlayerName) prints a tuple with two elements, while print "Name:", PlayerName does what you would expect. Thanks for the clarification Commented Apr 10, 2015 at 20:59
  • This is great! :) I just added the for-loop cause the given pseudo-code had a loop in it. I didn't want to change it too drastically (OP was actually supposed to use a while-loop).
    – logic
    Commented Apr 10, 2015 at 21:09
  • @logic, Yes, the original algorithm had a less succinct language in mind :) Commented Apr 10, 2015 at 22:24

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