85

Is it possible to limit the amount of times that setInterval will fire in javascript?

195

You can call clearInterval() after x calls:

var x = 0;
var intervalID = setInterval(function () {

   // Your logic here

   if (++x === 5) {
       window.clearInterval(intervalID);
   }
}, 1000);

To avoid global variables, an improvement of the above would be:

function setIntervalX(callback, delay, repetitions) {
    var x = 0;
    var intervalID = window.setInterval(function () {

       callback();

       if (++x === repetitions) {
           window.clearInterval(intervalID);
       }
    }, delay);
}

Then you can call the new setInvervalX() function as follows:

// This will be repeated 5 times with 1 second intervals:
setIntervalX(function () {
    // Your logic here
}, 1000, 5);
6
  • Hey @DanielVassallo, say i want to only clear the interval on the 3rd callback because maybe finally it passed some logic; will returning false break out of setIntervalX() or will an additional parameter somewhere be needed? It looks like if i return a bool from the callback(), i can then jump out of the interval.. Feb 24 '15 at 17:15
  • Thank you very much for the useful snippet @DanielVassallo
    – Anahit DEV
    Sep 28 '16 at 13:29
  • @BenSewards Where does it look like you can return a bool from the callback to jump out of the interval? You can put clearInterval in your callback as many times as you like and have it respond to any logic you like. There's no need to return a bool to achieve that same result. Aug 28 '18 at 19:01
  • There are three answers that use setTimeout to clear the interval and only two that clear the interval in the interval's own callback. Why is this way better? Aug 28 '18 at 19:03
  • @KyleDelaney I can't judge the technical quality of the answer, I just know that it is complete. For a newbie, the answer provides the function and an example of how to use the function. All the other answers are incomplete in that way and harder to use for new programmers.
    – Sun
    Sep 7 at 20:22
4

I personally prefer to use setTimeout() spaced out to achieve the same effect

// Set a function to run every "interval" seconds a total of "x" times
var x = 10;
var interval = 1000;

for (var i = 0; i < x; i++) {
    setTimeout(function () {
        // Do Something
    }, i * interval)
}

There's no clean up required with clearInterval()

You can enclose it to avoid variables leaking and it looks pretty clean :)

// Definition
function setIntervalLimited(callback, interval, x) {

    for (var i = 0; i < x; i++) {
        setTimeout(callback, i * interval);
    }

}

// Usage
setIntervalLimited(function() {
    console.log('hit');          // => hit...hit...etc (every second, stops after 10)
}, 1000, 10)
4

You can use setTimeout and a for loop.

var numberOfTimes = 20;
delay = 1000;

for (let i = 0; i < numberOfTimes; i++) {
    setTimeout( doSomething, delay * i);
}
1
  • @ProFan this "advice" sounds very arbitrary, nobody ever said such a thing
    – Jivan
    May 2 '20 at 9:07
4

You can set a timeout that calls clearInterval. This should work:

function setTimedInterval(callback, delay, timeout){
    var id=window.setInterval(callback, delay);
    window.setTimeout(function(){
        window.clearInterval(id);
    }, timeout);
}
5
  • Wow, my answer 13 seconds later was virtualy identical. Freaky. Jun 2 '10 at 10:58
  • @T.J. Sometimes I find the opposite more freaky: When we post many different solutions for one trivial problem! Jun 2 '10 at 11:05
  • @T.J. Crowder: Strange you using local variables and anonymous functions ;)
    – stagas
    Jun 2 '10 at 11:06
  • @T.J.Crowder thats nothing, I can clone an answer in less then 7 sec :) Apr 4 '17 at 14:21
  • This doesn't take X into consideration. If the callback execution time > delay then it will not be fired X times, which some are after. Example: setTimedInterval(callback, 100, 1000); if callback execution is >1 00ms, then it will be probably fired a few times not 10 times.
    – klodoma
    Jul 18 '19 at 7:18
1

This will clear the interval after 10 calls

<html>
<body>

<input type="text" id="clock" />
<script language=javascript>
var numOfCalls = 0;
var int=self.setInterval("clock()",1000);
function clock()
  {
  var d=new Date();
  var t=d.toLocaleTimeString();
  document.getElementById("clock").value=t;
  numOfCalls++;
  if(numOfCalls == 10)
     window.clearInterval(int);
  }
</script>
</form>


</body>
</html>
1

And for those of you preferring setTimeout and loving recursion here is my suggestion ;)

const setIntervalX = (fn, delay, times) => {
  if(!times) return

  setTimeout(() => {
    fn() 
    setIntervalX(fn, delay, times-1)
  }, delay)
}

Then as suggested you can call the new setInvervalX() function as follows:

// This will be repeated every for 5 times with 1 second intervals:
setIntervalX(function () {
    // Your logic here
}, 1000, 5);
1

You can do this actually very simply with setTimeout() and an incremental counter.

var i = 0; // counter for the timer
function doSomething() {
    console.log("1 second"); // your actual code here, alternatively call an other function here
    if (++i < 10)
    {   // only reset the timer when maximum of 10 times it is fired 
        console.log("reset the timer");
        setTimeout(doSomething, 1000); // reset the timer
    }
}
setTimeout(doSomething, 1000);  // init the first

This answer is based on SO: Repeating setTimeout and a nice, neat and tidy small combination with this.

0

I made a small package that does this for NodeJS.

https://www.npmjs.com/package/count-interval

It's a drop-in replacement for setInterval (including parameter passing), but it takes an additional count parameter. This example prints a message once every second, but only 3 times.

const countInterval = require('./countInterval');

const timer = countInterval(() => {
   console.log('fired!', new Date());
}, 1000, 3);

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