37

Is it possible to see the callee/caller of a function when use strict is enabled?

'use strict';

function jamie (){
    console.info(arguments.callee.caller.name);
    //this will output the below error
    //uncaught TypeError: 'caller', 'callee', and 'arguments' properties may not be accessed on strict mode functions or the arguments objects for calls to them
};

function jiminyCricket (){
   jamie();
}

jiminyCricket ();

  • 3
    In general (with very few exceptions) if you want to do that - you are doing something wrong. Try to explain the real problem you want to solve wit this code. – zerkms Apr 11 '15 at 0:03
  • 2
    There is no alternative. The recommended way is to use the function name directly like jamie.name // jamie. But function names are often irrelevant, other than for debugging, they make no difference in your code, and relying on this functionality for something other than recursion is usually an XY problem. – elclanrs Apr 11 '15 at 0:03
  • 2
    To be honest, there isn't any real problem with my code, but I have a function aliasing console.info so c = console.info essentially. So when I console something with said function, it just shows in the console that it came from the same place every time. i wanted to output which function called it. Just for my being lazy and cool all rolled into one :D – Jamie Hutber Apr 11 '15 at 0:06
  • 1
    ye of course :) But that means pressing f11.... I don't wanna have to do anything more if a little bit of code could do this for me :p I'm a programmer.. Its the only reason I do this... I'm lazy – Jamie Hutber Apr 11 '15 at 0:11
  • 2
    This MDN document gives an explanation why it was removed from JS Strict Mode. Basically, the ability to use arguments.callee and arguments.caller made certain JS engine optimisations difficult/impossible. – Phylogenesis Apr 11 '15 at 0:13
38

For what it's worth, I agree with the comments above. For whatever problem you're trying to solve, there are usually better solutions.

However, just for illustrative purposes, here's one (very ugly) solution:

'use strict'

function jamie (){
    var callerName;
    try { throw new Error(); }
    catch (e) { 
        var re = /(\w+)@|at (\w+) \(/g, st = e.stack, m;
        re.exec(st), m = re.exec(st);
        callerName = m[1] || m[2];
    }
    console.log(callerName);
};

function jiminyCricket (){
   jamie();
}

jiminyCricket(); // jiminyCricket

I've only tested this in Chrome, Firefox, and IE11, so your mileage may vary.

  • 1
    ha great idea. Throw a error. It really isn't a big deal as such. Just would be nice to know where the console.log's are coming from. I don't see this as a problem? – Jamie Hutber Apr 11 '15 at 0:21
  • 2
    This worked well. We had to use the throw version instead of @inetphantom's solution because an embedded JavaScript engine we had to work with didn't populate Error().stack until it was thrown. – RomSteady Sep 7 '16 at 19:15
  • Hi, is there any way to get parameters of the caller function? – easa Aug 3 '17 at 19:29
  • @easa I don't think there would be a general solution for that. You'd really need to inspect the stack in a debugger. – p.s.w.g Aug 3 '17 at 23:03
  • @easa pass this to the function and you have everything you need! – inetphantom Nov 29 '18 at 13:53
26

Please note that this should not be used for productive purposes. This is an ugly solution, which can be helpful for debugging, but if you need something from the caller, pass it as argument or save it into a accessible variable.

The short version of @p.s.w.g answer(without throwing an error, just instantiating one):

    let re = /([^(]+)@|at ([^(]+) \(/g;
    let aRegexResult = re.exec(new Error().stack);
    sCallerName = aRegexResult[1] || aRegexResult[2];

Full Snippet:

'use strict'

function jamie (){
    var sCallerName;
    {
        let re = /([^(]+)@|at ([^(]+) \(/g;
        let aRegexResult = re.exec(new Error().stack);
        sCallerName = aRegexResult[1] || aRegexResult[2];
    }
    console.log(sCallerName);
};

function jiminyCricket(){
   jamie();
};

jiminyCricket(); // jiminyCricket

  • The regex to match the name in the stack should probably be ([^(]+) instead of (\w+) because spaces and punctuation are common. – maffews Jul 11 '17 at 19:20
6

It does not worked for me Here is what I finally do, just in case it helps someone

function callerName() {
  try {
    throw new Error();
  }
  catch (e) {
    try {
      return e.stack.split('at ')[3].split(' ')[0];
    } catch (e) {
      return '';
    }
  }

}
function currentFunction(){
  let whoCallMe = callerName();
  console.log(whoCallMe);
}
  • Cany ou please explain why this worked for you and the other solutions did not? – Noel Widmer Jun 5 '17 at 10:37
  • I had something like exception on aRegexResult[1] index out of range – Benamar Jun 6 '17 at 11:22
  • aregexResult[1] index out of range is because names in the call stack that don't match \w+ are skipped. You should use [^(]+ instead. – maffews Jul 11 '17 at 19:22
  • This solution should work much faster than Regex. – Sergey Oct 20 '18 at 16:38
4

You can get a stack trace using:

console.trace()

but this is likely not useful if you need to do something with the caller.

See https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/Console/trace

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