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I am trying to create a function in C that returns a substring of any given char array. It is giving me most of the correct output, but I am also getting some strange characters at the start of the string. For instance, when given the input "abcdefg" and asked for chars 3 to 5, it gives me "ÀvWdef". So it appears I am getting the g cut off properly, but it is just doing something strange to the first 3 chars instead of ignoring them. My code is included below:

typedef char * String;
String subStr(String src, int start, int end){

   if ((start > (strLen(src)-1)) || start < 0 || end < start ||
        (end > (strLen(src) - 1)) ){
       return NULL;
   }
   int s = start, e = end;
   String r = (String)malloc((e - s + 1) * sizeof(char));

   while(s <= e){
       r[s] = src[s];
       s++;
   }
   r[s] = '\0';

   return r;
} 
  • 1
    regarding this line: 'String r = (String)malloc((e - s + 1) * sizeof(char));' 1) In C, do not cast the returned value from malloc (and family of functions) 2) always check (!=NULL) the returned value before using it to assure the operation was successful. 3) sizeof(char) is always 1, so mulitplying by 1 is a waste of code. suggest removing the '*sizeof(char)' – user3629249 Apr 11 '15 at 4:53
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    if start == end, then the malloc is obviously 1 character too short. this applies irregardless of the distance between start and end. When the 's' is last incremented and then the assignment of '\0' to the current place where 's' points, that is past the end of the allocated buffer. This results in undefined behaviour and can/will lead to a seg fault event – user3629249 Apr 11 '15 at 4:57
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    using 's' as the offset to 'r[]' means that the copied data will write past the end of the 'r[]' array, unless 'start = 0' – user3629249 Apr 11 '15 at 5:01
2

You have a logic error in:

while(s <= e){
   r[s] = src[s];
   s++;
}

The index for src is correct. But the index for r is not. You need another index.

i = 0;
while(s <= e){
   r[i] = src[s];
   s++;
   i++
}

After the loop, instead of:

r[s] = '\0';

use:

r[i] = '\0';

You also have logic error in the number of characters to allocate using malloc.

Given s = 3 and e = 5, you are returning a string that consists of src[3], src[4], src[5]. That is 3 characters. When you add the terminating null character, you need 4 characters. (e - s + 1) gives you only 3. Use (e - s + 2) instead.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    In addition to the error that 'R Sahu' has pointed out, if you intend to your start and end to be an /inclusive/ range, then your malloc is allocating for one character /less/ than what is required. Alternately, if you intend it to be a semi-open range (which is the 'standard' way), then your while loop condition should go while(s < e) i.e., strict inequality. – Happy Green Kid Naps Apr 11 '15 at 4:50
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When you allocate a block of memory with malloc it can be filled with anything so you should write zero to it initially.

bzero(r,e-s+1);

furthermore you want to start copying to r from index 0 not index s. You should not be using s for both.

Edit corrected < to <=

for(i =0; i <= e-s;i++)
    r[i] = src[s + i];
r[i] = '\0';
| improve this answer | |
  • this will copy 1 short of the number of bytes to be extracted. (if start == end then still need to copy one byte. Since every byte in 'r[]' will be written to, there is no need to initialize it (except to make debug easier) and the malloc'd number of bytes is too short as there needs to be room for the trailing '\0' byte – user3629249 Apr 11 '15 at 4:59
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I think the problem might be here:

r[s] = src[s];

Change it to

r[i++] = src[s];

where i keeps track of index of string r, and is initialised to 0.

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