6

File example; square matrix; size of matrix after #

#3
1.1 -0.2 0.1
0.1 -1.2 -0.2
0.2 -0.1 1.1

Approximately so i would write it in C

double **A;
int i,j,size=0;
FILE *f=NULL;

f=fopen("input.txt","w");
fscanf(f,"#%d\n",&size);
A=(double**)malloc(size*sizeof(double*));
for(i=0;i<size;i++)
    A[i]=(double*)malloc(size*sizeof(double));

for(i=0;i<size;i++)
{
    for(j=0;j<size;j++)
    {
        fscanf(f,"%lf",&A[i][j]);
    }
}
fclose(f);

I tried to use the method "read_to_string" and parse String, but I'm confused by the conversion between String and str.

1
  • 1
    Welcome to Stack Overflow! To get the most out of your questions, please read How to ask a good question. In this case, it would be strongly encouraged for you to include the MCVE you have tried so we can understand the problem you are having. Additionally, I'd recommend reading the Rust 30-minute intro and The Rust Book which cover many issues beginners run into!
    – Shepmaster
    Apr 11, 2015 at 17:44

1 Answer 1

12

This is a naive translation of your code to Rust:

use std::fs::File;
use std::io::{BufRead, BufReader};

fn main() {
    // open the file
    let mut f = BufReader::new(File::open("input.txt").unwrap());

    // read the first line and extract the number from it
    let mut num_line = String::new();
    f.read_line(&mut num_line).unwrap();
    let n: usize = num_line[1..].trim().parse().unwrap();

    // preallocate the array and read the data into it
    let mut arr = vec![vec![0f64; n]; n];
    for (i, line) in f.lines().enumerate() {
        for (j, number) in line.unwrap().split(char::is_whitespace).enumerate() {
            arr[i][j] = number.trim().parse().unwrap();
        }
    }

    println!("{:?}", arr);
}

There is more idiomatic way to perform the loop in Rust, though:

use std::fs::File;
use std::io::{BufRead, BufReader};

fn main() {
    let mut f = BufReader::new(File::open("input.txt").unwrap());

    let mut num_line = String::new();
    f.read_line(&mut num_line).unwrap();
    let n: usize = num_line[1..].trim().parse().unwrap();

    let arr: Vec<Vec<f64>> = f.lines()
        .take(n)
        .map(|l| l.unwrap().split(char::is_whitespace)
             .take(n)
             .map(|number| number.parse().unwrap())
             .collect())
        .collect();

    println!("{:?}", arr);
}

In fact, you don't even need the number of lines in advance to read the data if the format of your file is completely fixed:

use std::fs::File;
use std::io::{BufRead, BufReader};

fn main() {
    let mut f = BufReader::new(File::open("input.txt").unwrap());

    let mut s = String::new();
    f.read_line(&mut s).unwrap();

    let arr: Vec<Vec<f64>> = f.lines()
        .map(|l| l.unwrap().split(char::is_whitespace)
             .map(|number| number.parse().unwrap())
             .collect())
        .collect();

    println!("{:?}", arr);
}
3
  • let mut s = String::new(); f.read_line(&mut s).unwrap(); These actions are necessary?
    – vessd
    Apr 12, 2015 at 12:04
  • 1
    You mean the last example, right? Yes, these are necessary - you need to skip the first line which contains the number of elements. If you can change the format so it doesn't have the first line, you can omit these of course. Apr 12, 2015 at 13:14
  • spasibo for this post
    – Galaxy
    Dec 20, 2019 at 22:56

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