8

I have the following list of divs

<div id="multi-picker">
  <div id="opt1">
     <input type="checkbox">  Option 1
  </div>
  <div id="opt2">
     <input type="checkbox">  Option 2
  </div>
  etc...
</div>

All working, but I'm not happy with the keyboard navigation. To navigate from opt1 to opt2 I need to press the tab key. Ideally I want to treat the options as a select and navigate with up/down arrow. Can this be done?

Alternatively... Is there any way to have a multi-select with the options styled with checkboxes to reflect the selection state of each option?

8
+200

I think you'll need javascript and using a plugin is an easier way to accomplish the task and maintain cross-browser functionality. However, here is a fiddle that, I think, kind of does what you want using just javascript. It defines additional attributes on your select elements and uses an onkeydown function to handle the navigation between the elements.

function keyPressed(e) {
    var srcElement = e.target;    // get the element that fired the onkeydown function
    var dataset = false;
    var selectList = false;
    var next = "";
    var prev = "";
    if (srcElement.dataset) {        // can we use HTML5 dataset?
        dataset = true;              // remember for later
        // is this an element for which we care
        if (srcElement.dataset.selectlist == 'true') {
            selectList = true;
        }
    } else {    // can't use HTML5 dataset, use getAttribute
        if (srcElement.getAttribute('data-selectlist') == 'true') {
            selectList = true;
        }
    }
    // is it a select element and the user pressed either up arrow or down arrow
    if (selectList && (e.keyCode == '38' || e.keyCode == '40')) {
        // get the next and prev navigation options for this element
        if (dataset) {
            next = srcElement.dataset.next;
            prev = srcElement.dataset.prev;
        } else {
            next = srcElement.getAttribute('data-next');
            prev = srcElement.getAttribute('data-prev');
        }
        // up arrow was pressed and a prev element is defined
        if (e.keyCode == '38' && prev != '') {
            document.getElementById(prev).focus();
        }
        // down arrow was pressed and a next element is defined
        if (e.keyCode == '40' && next != '') {
            document.getElementById(next).focus();
        }
        // don't do native processing of the up or down arrow (page scrolling)
        e.preventDefault;
    }
}
document.onkeydown = keyPressed;

Here is the new html that contains the additional elements:

<div id="multi-picker">
    <div id="opt1">
        <input id="select1" type="checkbox" data-selectlist="true" data-prev="" data-next="select2">  Option 1
    </div>
    <div id="opt2">
        <input id="select2" type="checkbox" data-selectlist="true" data-prev="select1" data-next="">  Option 2
    </div>
</div>

This code is very specific to the problem presented and, though it may solve the problem, it would probably be better to use a general purpose plugin that would allow for more general application across your environment. You may also run into problems related to what your user expects the down and up arrow keys to do versus what you are doing by intercepting them.

In my experience I've run into problems where different browsers and even different end-user platforms present different behavior to the application making implementation consistency spotty. Many of the plugins are designed to eliminate that inconsistency and provide a cleaner, more intuitive interface.

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2

Alternatively... Is there any way to have a multi-select with the options styled with checkboxes to reflect the selection state of each option?

That has multi-browser support? Not really. However, if you're a "It works in Chrome, it ships!" type dev, then you could totally fake a multi select to appear to have checkboxes that reflect the selection state of each option with good ol' CSS.

First our HTML:

<select multiple="multiple">
    <option>Hello</option>
    <option>World</option>
    <option>Hello</option>
    <option>World</option>
</select>

A simple select...

Next, dat CSS:

select {
    border: none;
}
select:focus {
    outline: none;
}
select option:before {
    display: inline-block;
    content: '';
    width: 13px;
    height: 13px;
    position: relative;
    margin-right: 3px;
    background-image: url('http://i.imgur.com/5xszy3H.png');
    background-position: -40px 0px;
    top: 2px;
}

option with generated content

Using generated content, we've now applied our pseudo checkboxes. Let's add that last bit of CSS to give us a proper selected state!

select option:checked:before {
    background-position: -40px -40px;
}

:checked state applied

Woop.

Here's a fiddle to play around with: http://jsfiddle.net/9tLz6ugz/

In (limited) testing, this seemed to only work in Chrome and FireFox (both latest on OSX). Safari, IE, and Opera ignored the generated content all together. So, while not practical (at least not today), it's somewhat doable!

(Here's another fiddle without the background-image - requires a bit more work to get the look/feel consistent across browsers: http://jsfiddle.net/wpch98tg/ But does demonstrate use of unicode to fake a "checkbox" in a multi-select...)

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1

I don't believe you'll find a way with plain HTML & CSS - this gets too far into customizing the core functionality so a bit of JavaScript should do the trick (I'm also using jQuery to make it slightly easier).

For my test, I used <label> instead of <div> to wrap the checkboxes, but this same idea holds true for divs. I just prefer labels so if JavaScript doesn't load, the checkboxes are still clickable.

<div class="fake-select">
    <label for="fs1"><input type="checkbox" id="fs1" name="fs1" />Fake 1</label>
    <label for="fs2"><input type="checkbox" id="fs2" name="fs2" />Fake 2</label>
    [ ... ]
</div>

Basically, you need to track the user's keypresses and an "active" input. Look for up/down arrow key presses and change the active input based on that (scroll to it, add a class name for styling). I have it also allowing the space bar to check/uncheck the currently active box.

var fs = $(".fake-select"),
    items = fs.find('input'),
    divs = fs.find('label'),
    active = 0;

// Hook keypresses
fs.keydown( function(e){
    reCalculate(e);
    rePosition();
    return false;
});

// Click event for manual changes
items.unbind('click').click(function(e){
    var thisInput = $(this),
        thisLabel = $(this).parent();
    window.active = thisLabel.index();

    thisLabel.removeClass("checked");
    if (thisInput.is(":checked"))
        thisLabel.addClass("checked");

    rePosition();
});

// Set new active element based on keypress
//    Trigger click event if user hits space bar
function reCalculate(e){
    var max = items.length -1,
        cur = window.active,
        charCode = (typeof e.which == "number" && e.which) ? e.which : e.keyCode;

    if (charCode == 38) { // move up
        cur--;
        cur = (cur <= 0) ? 0 : cur;
    }
    if (charCode == 40) { // move down
        cur++;
        cur = (cur >= max) ? max : cur;
    }
    if (charCode == 32) { // space bar
        items.eq(cur).focus().trigger('click');
    }
    window.active = cur;
}

// Add active class, call scroll function
function rePosition(){
    divs.removeClass('active').eq(window.active).addClass('active');
    scrollInView();
}

// Scroll the list so the active element is in view
function scrollInView(){
    var target = divs.eq(window.active);
    if (target.length) {
        var top = fs.scrollTop() + target.position().top - fs.height()/2 + target.height()/2

        fs.stop().animate({scrollTop: top}, 400);
    }
    return false;
}

jsFiddle example: http://jsfiddle.net/daCrosby/kqecngv0/13/

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0

Can you use jQuery? This will activate the focus functionality via up/down arrow

function focusOnCheckboxes(locator){

var checkboxes = jQuery(locator).find(':checkbox');
var index = 0;

jQuery(locator).on('keydown', function(e){
    if(  e.keyCode == 38 ){
        if(index > 0){
            index = index - 1;
        }
        checkboxes[index].focus();
    }
    else if(e.keyCode == 40){
        if(index < checkboxes.length - 1){
           index = index + 1;     
        }
        else{
             index = checkboxes.length - 1;   
        }
        checkboxes[index].focus();
    }
    else{
        //console.log(e.keyCode);
    }
});
}

// set the locator
focusOnCheckboxes('body');
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