39

Is there a function in Swift that checks whether all elements of an array have the same value? In my case, it's an array of type Int. I know I can iterate over it using a simple for loop I was just wondering if there is something that is built in and quicker.

4 Answers 4

62

With Swift 5, you can use one of the four following ways in order to tests if all elements of an array are equal.


#1. Using Array's allSatisfy(_:) method

allSatisfy(_:) returns a Boolean value indicating whether every element of a sequence satisfies a given predicate. You can set the predicate to test if all elements of the array are equal:

let array = [1, 1, 1]

let hasAllItemsEqual = array.dropFirst().allSatisfy({ $0 == array.first })
print(hasAllItemsEqual) // prints: true
let array = [1, 1, 3]

let hasAllItemsEqual = array.dropFirst().allSatisfy({ $0 == array.first })
print(hasAllItemsEqual) // prints: false
let array = [Int]()

let hasAllItemsEqual = array.dropFirst().allSatisfy({ $0 == array.first })
print(hasAllItemsEqual) // prints: true

#2. Using Array's reduce(_:_:) method

As an alternative to allSatisfy(_:), you can use reduce(_:_:):

let array = [1, 1, 1]

let hasAllItemsEqual = array.dropFirst().reduce(true) { (partialResult, element) in
    return partialResult && element == array.first
}
print(hasAllItemsEqual) // prints: true
let array = [1, 1, 3]

let hasAllItemsEqual = array.dropFirst().reduce(true) { (partialResult, element) in
    return partialResult && element == array.first
}
print(hasAllItemsEqual) // prints: false
let array = [Int]()

let hasAllItemsEqual = array.dropFirst().reduce(true) { (partialResult, element) in
    return partialResult && element == array.first
}
print(hasAllItemsEqual) // prints: true

#3. Using elementsEqual(_:) method

elementsEqual(_:) returns a Boolean value indicating whether two sequences contain the same elements in the same order. Therefore you can create a new collection by repeating the first element of the initial array and compare the former with the latter:

let array = [1, 1, 1]

precondition(!array.isEmpty)
let repeated = repeatElement(array[0], count: array.count)

let hasAllItemsEqual = array.elementsEqual(repeated)
print(hasAllItemsEqual) // prints: true
let array = [1, 1, 3]

precondition(!array.isEmpty)
let repeated = repeatElement(array[0], count: array.count)

let hasAllItemsEqual = array.elementsEqual(repeated)
print(hasAllItemsEqual) // prints: false

#4. Using Set's init(_:) initalizer

If all elements of an array are equal, creating a set from this array should result in the set having only one element:

let array = [1, 1, 1]

let set = Set(array)
let hasAllItemsEqual = set.count <= 1
print(hasAllItemsEqual) // prints: true
let array = [1, 1, 3]

let set = Set(array)
let hasAllItemsEqual = set.count <= 1
print(hasAllItemsEqual) // prints: false
let array = [Int]()

let set = Set(array)
let hasAllItemsEqual = set.count <= 1
print(hasAllItemsEqual) // prints: true
0
42

Any method must iterate over all elements until a different element is found:

func allEqualUsingLoop<T : Equatable>(array : [T]) -> Bool {
    if let firstElem = array.first {
        for elem in array {
            if elem != firstElem {
                return false
            }
        }
    }
    return true
}

Instead of an explicit loop you can use the contains() function:

func allEqualUsingContains<T : Equatable>(array : [T]) -> Bool {
    if let firstElem = array.first {
        return !contains(array, { $0 != firstElem })
    }
    return true
}

If the array elements are Hashable (such as Int) then you can create a Set (available since Swift 1.2) from the array elements and check if it has exactly one element.

func allEqualUsingSet<T : Hashable>(array : [T]) -> Bool {
    let uniqueElements = Set(array)
    return count(uniqueElements) <= 1
}

A quick benchmarking test revealed that the "contains" method is much faster than the "set" method for an array of 1,000,000 integers, in particular if the elements are not all equal. This make sense because contains() returns as soon as a non-matching element is found, whereas Set(array) always traverses the entire array.

Also the "contains" methods is equally fast or slightly faster than an explicit loop.

Here is some simple benchmarking code. Of course the results can vary with the array size, the number of different elements and the elements data type.

func measureExecutionTime<T>(title: String,  @noescape f : (() -> T) ) -> T {
    let start = NSDate()
    let result = f()
    let end = NSDate()
    let duration = end.timeIntervalSinceDate(start)
    println("\(title) \(duration)")
    return result
}

var array = [Int](count: 1_000_000, repeatedValue: 1)
array[500_000] = 2

let b1 = measureExecutionTime("using loop    ") {
    return allEqualUsingLoop(array)
}

let b2 = measureExecutionTime("using contains") {
    allEqualUsingContains(array)
}

let b3 = measureExecutionTime("using set     ") {
    allEqualUsingSet(array)
}

Results (on a MacBook Pro, Release configuration):

using loop     0.000651001930236816
using contains 0.000567018985748291
using set      0.0344770550727844

With array[1_000] = 2 the results are

using loop     9.00030136108398e-06
using contains 2.02655792236328e-06
using set      0.0306439995765686

Update for Swift 2/Xcode 7: Due to various changes in the Swift syntax, the function is now written as

func allEqual<T : Equatable>(array : [T]) -> Bool {
    if let firstElem = array.first {
        return !array.dropFirst().contains { $0 != firstElem }
    }
    return true
}

But you can now also define it as an extension method for arrays:

extension Array where Element : Equatable {
    func allEqual() -> Bool {
        if let firstElem = first {
            return !dropFirst().contains { $0 != firstElem }
        }
        return true
    }
}

print([1, 1, 1].allEqual()) // true
print([1, 2, 1].allEqual()) // false
7
  • Was trying the same... compiler checked ;-)
    – Antonio
    Commented Apr 12, 2015 at 10:02
  • If you’re interested in another one to try, you could use equal and Repeat: array.first.map { equal(array, Repeat(count: array.count, repeatedValue: $0)) } ?? true (it’s slower) Commented Apr 12, 2015 at 12:07
  • 1
    @AirspeedVelocity: It is slower, but not drastically: With array[500_000] = 2 I measure 0.001789 sec and with array[1_000] = 2 3.99e-06 sec.
    – Martin R
    Commented Apr 12, 2015 at 12:24
  • Yeah it’ll be the extra overhead of it checking they are the same length (even though that doesn’t actually matter) I expect. Commented Apr 12, 2015 at 12:28
  • That's one fine answer! Thanks
    – nevos
    Commented Apr 13, 2015 at 9:17
17

Soliution for Swift 4.2/Xcode 10:

let arr = [1, 1, 1, 1]
let allItemsEqual = arr.dropLast().allSatisfy { $0 == arr.last }
print(allItemsEqual)

If your current version of Xcode is prior to 10.0 you can find the function allSatisfy of ArraySlice in Xcode9to10Preparation. You can install this library with CocoaPods.

5
  • You don't really need dropLast().
    – Sulthan
    Commented Oct 10, 2018 at 16:20
  • @Sulthan It is important to add dropLast() here. In my example if I will remove dropLast() the block passed to allSatisfy will be called 4 times, but now it is calling only 3 times, and result is the same. Commented Oct 10, 2018 at 16:34
  • You don't need it. Complexity is the same
    – Lirik
    Commented Dec 5, 2019 at 16:31
  • @Lirik You can add your own answer and explain why there should not be dropLast(). Commented Dec 5, 2019 at 22:01
  • 2
    I understand its redundant to check if the last object equals to itself, but going over the array 3 times or 4 times has the same Complexity in CS terms, so it doesn't really matter.
    – Lirik
    Commented Dec 6, 2019 at 18:57
1
let ints: [Int] = [1, 1, 1, 1]
print(ints.max() == ints.min())

If you have float buffers or if you already have an array of floats (or you think converting to floats beforehand is convenient):

import Accelerate

// [...]

// let floats = ints.map({ Double($0) })
print(vDSP.minimum(floats) == vDSP.maximum(floats))
1
  • I think, this is the best solution for int array. Comparing min and max values is really good idea.
    – Guru Dev
    Commented Oct 28, 2022 at 18:56

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