3

I'd like to have a variable I can modify inside a lambda without affecting the enclosing scope. Something that behaves like this:

std::vector vec = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0 };
{
  auto sum = 0;
  std::for_each(vec.begin(), vec.end(), [sum](int value) mutable
  {
    sum += value;
    std::cout << "Sum is up to: " << sum << '/n';
  });
}

However, I'd like to be able to do it without declaring the sum variable outside the lambda. Something like this:

std::vector vec = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0 };

std::for_each(vec.begin(), vec.end(), [auto sum = 0](int value) mutable
{
  sum += value;
  std::cout << "Sum is up to: " << sum << '/n';
});

So sum is only visible inside the lambda, not in the enclosing scope. Is it possible in C++11/14?

  • 10
    Remove the auto and replace 11 with 14 and you're good to go. – Kerrek SB Apr 12 '15 at 23:08
  • @KerrekSB That is awesome! Thanks :) – Kian Apr 12 '15 at 23:55
10

C++14 introduces Generalized Lambda Capture that allows you to do what you want.

The capture will be deduced from the type of the init expression as if by auto.

[sum = 0] (int value) mutable {
    // 'sum' has been deduced to 'int' and initialized to '0' here.
    /* ... */
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Interesting, that's the first time I see someone refer to this feature by that name. Usually I see init-capture, or "generalized lambda capture". – T.C. Apr 13 '15 at 5:30
  • @T.C. You're right, it is generally refered to by those names. Edited. – Snps Apr 13 '15 at 10:43
0

If you're stuck with C++11 (and cannot use C++14's lambda capture expressions, see @Snps' answer), then you can declare a static variable inside the lambda, as you'd do in any other function. Example below:

#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    std::vector<int> vec = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0 };
    std::for_each(vec.begin(), vec.end(), [](int value)
    {
        static decltype(vec)::value_type sum{};
        sum += value;
        std::cout << "Sum is up to: " << sum << '\n';
    });
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Seems to me that the initialization of "sum" will only occur once per run. In this example with "main" that won't matter but in the general case it's a problem. Also, statics break reentrancy (and can restrict optimization). See stackoverflow.com/questions/8391058/… – greggo Apr 13 '15 at 0:38
  • @greggo Not sure I understand what you mean by "Seems to me that the initialization of "sum" will only occur once per run." sum is initialized only on the first call, like any static var. in a regular function. Thanks for the link. – vsoftco Apr 13 '15 at 0:41
  • 1
    .. So if you put this in a func called "sumvec" instead of "main", the second call to " sumvec" will not work, because "sum" is only initialized once. – greggo Apr 13 '15 at 0:48
  • @greggo well it depends on what exactly one tries to achieve. I agree that using capture expressions is better in this respect, as you can "reuse" the same lambda (i.e. the object generated from the closure). – vsoftco Apr 13 '15 at 0:56
  • I think it goes beyond that. Each call to "sumarr" constructs a new lambda object in either case, but the static variable is common to all instances. static locals which change from call to call have very limited uses, I wouldn't call this one of them. – greggo Apr 13 '15 at 1:01
0

At least in my opinion, there are better ways to do this. You're using std::for_each, but using it to imitate std::accumulate. The latter is the clear choice for the job at hand:

#include <numeric>
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

int main(){
    std::vector<int> vec = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0 };

    std::accumulate(vec.begin(), vec.end(), 0, [](int sum, int val) {
        sum += val;
        std::cout << "sum is up to: " << sum << "\n";
        return sum; });
}

I'm not sure if it really matters to you, but this doesn't require any features beyond C++11.

| improve this answer | |
  • The example is for illustrative purposes only. Accumulate wouldn't really fit, and the name would be confusing in review. It is good to remember that there are other functions in algorithms, though. I don't always check before trying to do something. – Kian Apr 21 '15 at 2:50
  • @Kian: Yet what you asked for was a value in which to accumulate (something) from one invocation of the lambda to the next... – Jerry Coffin Apr 21 '15 at 5:16
  • I can see how "a variable that retains a value from the previous invocation and applies an operation on it" is a kind of accumulator. If I want an index, for example, I'd accumulate and add one every iteration. However, std::accumulate returns the accumulator. If you want to use an index because you need to index into some other structure from within the lambda, the name is misleading. Accumulating is an implementation detail, I don't care to accumulate anything. Someone reading the code 6 months later might wonder why you call accumulate and discard the return value. – Kian Apr 21 '15 at 19:17
0

If C++14 is not available, you can wrap everything in a lambda, which will return the original lambda, and call it immediately.

std::for_each(vec.begin(), vec.end(), []()
{
    auto sum = 0;
    return [sum](int value) mutable
    {
        sum += value;
        std::cout << "Sum is up to: " << sum << '\n';
    };
}());

This way the lifetime of the temporary sum is minimal.

| improve this answer | |

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