9

I want to implement a clock within my program to diusplay the date and time while the program is running. I have looked into the getCurrentTime() method and Timers but none of them seem to do what I would like.

The problem is I can get the current time when the program loads but it never updates. Any suggestions on something to look into would be greatly appreciated!

2
  • 1
    I don't do Swing extensively, so no detailed answer from mine, but Google seems to give enough hints: google.com/search?q=java+swing+clock To the point: you need to update the clock yourself everytime in a background thread.
    – BalusC
    Jun 2, 2010 at 16:48
  • 1
    @BalusC but you do google extensively ;)
    – Bozho
    Jun 2, 2010 at 16:50

7 Answers 7

15

What you need to do is use Swing's Timer class.

Just have it run every second and update the clock with the current time.

Timer t = new Timer(1000, updateClockAction);
t.start();

This will cause the updateClockAction to fire once a second. It will run on the EDT.

You can make the updateClockAction similar to the following:

ActionListener updateClockAction = new ActionListener() {
  public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
      // Assumes clock is a custom component
      yourClock.setTime(System.currentTimeMillis()); 
      // OR
      // Assumes clock is a JLabel
      yourClock.setText(new Date().toString()); 
    }
}

Because this updates the clock every second, the clock will be off by 999ms in a worse case scenario. To increase this to a worse case error margin of 99ms, you can increase the update frequency:

Timer t = new Timer(100, updateClockAction);
1
  • 3
    I did a test and the update was always about half second behind using javax.swing.Timer but, I don't know why
    – OscarRyz
    Jun 2, 2010 at 17:54
5

You have to update the text in a separate thread every second.

Ideally you should update swing component only in the EDT ( event dispatcher thread ) but, after I tried it on my machine, using Timer.scheduleAtFixRate gave me better results:

java.util.Timer http://img175.imageshack.us/img175/8876/capturadepantalla201006o.png

The javax.swing.Timer version was always about half second behind:

javax.swing.Timer http://img241.imageshack.us/img241/2599/capturadepantalla201006.png

I really don't know why.

Here's the full source:

package clock;

import javax.swing.*;
import java.util.*;
import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;

class Clock {
    private final JLabel time = new JLabel();
    private final SimpleDateFormat sdf  = new SimpleDateFormat("hh:mm");
    private int   currentSecond;
    private Calendar calendar;

    public static void main( String [] args ) {
        JFrame frame = new JFrame();
        Clock clock = new Clock();
        frame.add( clock.time );
        frame.pack();
        frame.setVisible( true );
        clock.start();
    }
    private void reset(){
        calendar = Calendar.getInstance();
        currentSecond = calendar.get(Calendar.SECOND);
    }
    public void start(){
        reset();
        Timer timer = new Timer();
        timer.scheduleAtFixedRate( new TimerTask(){
            public void run(){
                if( currentSecond == 60 ) {
                    reset();
                }
                time.setText( String.format("%s:%02d", sdf.format(calendar.getTime()), currentSecond ));
                currentSecond++;
            }
        }, 0, 1000 );
    }
}

Here's the modified source using javax.swing.Timer

    public void start(){
        reset();
        Timer timer = new Timer(1000, new ActionListener(){
        public void actionPerformed( ActionEvent e ) {
                if( currentSecond == 60 ) {
                    reset();
                }
                time.setText( String.format("%s:%02d", sdf.format(calendar.getTime()), currentSecond ));
                currentSecond++;
            }
        });
        timer.start();
    }

Probably I should change the way the string with the date is calculated, but I don't think that's the problem here

I have read, that, since Java 5 the recommended is: ScheduledExecutorService I leave you the task to implement it.

1
  • I don't know, probably it was the startup time ( to get into the EDT or something ) but I couldn't recover them.
    – OscarRyz
    Jun 2, 2010 at 18:26
3

This sounds like you might have a conceptual problem. When you create a new java.util.Date object, it will be initialised to the current time. If you want to implement a clock, you could create a GUI component which constantly creates a new Date object and updates the display with the latest value.

One question you might have is how to repeatedly do something on a schedule? You could have an infinite loop that creates a new Date object then calls Thread.sleep(1000) so that it gets the latest time every second. A more elegant way to do this is to use a TimerTask. Typically, you do something like:

private class MyTimedTask extends TimerTask {

   @Override
   public void run() {
      Date currentDate = new Date();
      // Do something with currentDate such as write to a label
   }
}

Then, to invoke it, you would do something like:

Timer myTimer = new Timer();
myTimer.schedule(new MyTimedTask (), 0, 1000);  // Start immediately, repeat every 1000ms
2
  • 4
    This code probably works fine, but since you are using Java.util.Timer, you need to make sure that you use SwingUtilities.invokeLater() to update the GUI.
    – jjnguy
    Jun 2, 2010 at 17:14
  • Definitely. I was deliberately vague about the "Do Something" bit, I didn't want to introduce too many things simultaneously.
    – PhilDin
    Jun 2, 2010 at 17:57
3
   public void start(){
        reset();
        ScheduledExecutorService worker = Executors.newScheduledThreadPool(3);
         worker.scheduleAtFixedRate( new Runnable(){
            public void run(){
                if( currentSecond == 60 ) {
                    reset();
                }
                time.setText( String.format("%s:%02d", sdf.format(calendar.getTime()), currentSecond));
                currentSecond++;
            }
        }, 0, 1000 ,TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS );
    } 
0
2

For those preferring an analog display: Analog Clock JApplet.

0

Note the method scheduleAtFixedRate is used here

        // Current time label
        final JLabel currentTimeLabel = new JLabel();
        currentTimeLabel.setFont(new Font("Monospace", Font.PLAIN, 18));
        currentTimeLabel.setHorizontalAlignment(JTextField.LEFT);

        // Schedule a task for repainting the time
        final Timer currentTimeTimer = new Timer();
        TimerTask task = new TimerTask() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                currentTimeLabel.setText(TIME_FORMATTER.print(System.currentTimeMillis()));
            }
        };

        currentTimeTimer.scheduleAtFixedRate(task, 0, 1000);
0
    Timer timer = new Timer(1000, (ActionEvent e) -> {
        DateTimeFormatter myTime = DateTimeFormatter.ofPattern("HH:mm:ss");
        LocalDateTime now = LocalDateTime.now(); 
        jLabel1.setText(String.valueOf(myTime.format(now)));
    });
    timer.setRepeats(true);
    timer.start();
1
  • Hi, welcome to Stack Overflow. When answering a question that already has many answers, please be sure to add some additional insight into why the response you're providing is substantive and not simply echoing what's already been vetted by the original poster. This is especially important in "code-only" answers such as the one you've provided.
    – chb
    Feb 23, 2019 at 2:21

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