This question already has an answer here:

I know this question was answered so many times, but I am so confused about how to inherit (yes, inherit....again) two Javascript functions. Assumed that I have a class called 'Base' which is the one that I want to inherit;

function Base(model)
{
  var self=this;

  self._model=model;

  return self;
}

Base.prototype.modelName= function()
              {
                   return  self._model.Name; 
              };

Then I create a new class call Foo.

function Foo()
{
  var self=this;

   self.hello=function()
   {
          return 'Hello World';
   }

   return self;
}

What code should I add to the Foo class to be able to do something like this? var myModel={type:1, name:'My Model'};

var myObj=new Foo(myModel);
var  result= MyObj.modelName();

I know I should use the object.create() method, but I cannot understand exactly how! :(

Thank you guys, and again sorry for this silly question.....I am really struggling with this basic concept here!!!!

marked as duplicate by jfriend00 javascript Apr 13 '15 at 5:26

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 1
    Have you actually Googled "Javascript Inheritance examples" and not found a single example? There are thousands of examples there. Some basic internet research should be attempted before you post here. And, then, if you are still stuck after that basic research, you should tell us exactly what you tried and where you got stuck. – jfriend00 Apr 13 '15 at 5:13
  • Also relevant duplicate question/answer JavaScript inheritance with Object.create()? and an answer worth reading and understanding Javascript inheritance: call super-constructor or use prototype chain?. – jfriend00 Apr 13 '15 at 5:28
  • jfriend00, thank you....but instad of having this attitude, you could spend 5 seconds of your time to explain with 2 simple line of codes how this thing works (as vigneswaran-marimuthu did). You are not obligated to answer to any questions. I completely understand that you marked my question as duplicated (I knew it from the beginning), but give me a 'lecture' instead of answer to my question is actually not helpful. Again, if you don't want to waste your time on elementary question like mine was, just don't do it. Anyway, thank you for your precious comments. – MilitelloVinx Apr 13 '15 at 5:35
  • No - that is not how this site works. They don't accept questions that do not show an attempt at basic research and effort. And, don't accept questions that have been asked many other times here. You will need to learn these guidelines if you want to successfully use this site. Your answer is very easily seen in a simple Google search which illustrates you did not do the most basic research on your problem. I did provide you links to three other answers that all explain how JS inheritance works in great detail. StackOverflow does not want to duplicate answers that have already been covered. – jfriend00 Apr 13 '15 at 5:37
  • 1
    I think that there are, perhaps, far better answers out there than anything I might put here, not least of which is MDN's own article on the subject of JavaScript inheritance. – Thomas Preston Apr 13 '15 at 5:43
up vote 0 down vote accepted

JavaScript uses prototypal inheritance. To inherit from Base class, use like

Foo.prototype = new Base();

But you can't pass parameters into Foo. You need to move model save logic to Foo.

NOTE: Don't return the created object from constructor functions. By default, created object is returned.

EDITED

function Base() {

}

Base.prototype.modelName = function () {
    return  self._model.Name; 
};

function Foo(model)
{

    this._model = model

    this.hello = function () {
        return 'Hello World';
    }

}

Foo.prototype = new Base();
  • Thank you! The fact is that the 'model' variable is something that make sense to be on my base class. I guess I should do something like Base.prototype.init = function(model){ /*my stuff here*/} – MilitelloVinx Apr 13 '15 at 5:30
  • Yeah. You can do that and you can call superclass init from subcalss with entire arguments list :) – Vigneswaran Marimuthu Apr 13 '15 at 5:36

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