8

First of all, no, I'm not trying to create any sort of Java-like interface for my JavaScript code. I've seen those questions all over, and while I'm still a relative novice to JavaScript, my mind recoiled in (IMO) appropriate horror at the thought.

However, I'm curious what the actual intended use of the interface keyword is. For example, Math is an interface, containing definitions (but not implementations). I believe (and may be totally wrong) that these are there to provide a means for the definers of the language to enforce a set of behaviors to be implemented in various JavaScript engines. Is that correct?

Furthermore, I have a desire to have a "static class" that contains a bunch of utility methods. I like that Math.sqrt(3) has an outer namespace ('Math') which is capitalized, and a number of logically similar methods and values in it. Maybe it's just my Java/Ruby background that makes me want a capital on the grouping objects. Is that bad form?

var ShapeInspections = {
  isSymmetrical: function (s) {
    // determine if shape is symmetrical
  },
  numAngles: function (s) {
    // return the number of angles
  }
}

A purely contrived example, but is it anti-idiomatic to name the "module" this way?

  • IMHO this is completely fine, and I use this pattern quite often. – meskobalazs Apr 13 '15 at 8:01
  • 1
    What interface keyword?! It's reserved for future use, but even in ES6 it has no defined use. – Alnitak Apr 13 '15 at 8:04
  • Capitals generally denote constructors, don't use them. Or do use them, but possibly to the confusion of other devs. I use capitals in collections functions to denote collections, but I'm weird and it's bad practice. – Adam Tolley Jun 12 '17 at 15:14
  • Also don't conflate Classical inheritance and all associated baggage with the concept of interfaces, which in languages like C# and Java are useful to escape single inheritance. Interfaces have plenty of usages and well defined types are not inherently evil or inflexible. I would encourage, however, maintaining a healthy fear of OOP in js – Adam Tolley Jun 12 '17 at 15:16
8

Okay, so as with other answers, you know that the keyword interface has no real use case in Javascript world, yet.

Your Math example made me suspicous that you are talking about a design pattern, called Module Pattern, widely used for scoping Javascript code. There are many ways of making your code modular. For example just like OddDev answered you , the famous Prototype Pattern can embed your code in a modular fashion (just like your Math example). Here is the Revealing Prototype Pattern example with also private variables and functions for additional flexibility:

/* Example from: 
    http://www.innoarchitech.com/scalable-maintainable-javascript-modules */
var myPrototypeModule = (function (){

   var privateVar = "Alex Castrounis",
       count = 0;

   function PrototypeModule(name){
    this.name = name;
   }

   function privateFunction() {
      console.log( "Name:" + privateVar );
      count++;
   }

   PrototypeModule.prototype.setName = function(strName){
      this.name = strName;
   };

   PrototypeModule.prototype.getName = function(){
      privateFunction();
   };

   return PrototypeModule;     
})();

but that is not all. Other options include Scoped module pattern, POJO module pattern and many more. Have a look at How to Write Highly Scalable and Maintainable JavaScript: Modules, it has a very simple and yet thorough set of examples.

So far, we talked about plain Javascript. If you have the ability to use libraries in your code, then amazing set of libraries such as Requirejs, CommonsJS are there to help you on this with out-of-the-box functionalities. Have a look at Addy Osmani's post about Writing Modular JavaScript With AMD, CommonJS & ES Harmony.

  • I'll definitely check out the Castrounis article. Thanks! – erich2k8 Apr 14 '15 at 11:43
3

The interface keyword in javascript is a FutureReservedWord, so it does absolutely nothing right now, though that may change in the future specifications. (See ECMAScript 5.1, section 7.6.1.2). In the ES6 draft, this is also the same.

As for you module, this is a perfectly idiomatic solution. It is always a good idea to "namespace" your functions, as it keeps the global scope as clean as possible.

0

I believe (and may be totally wrong) that these are there to provide a means for the definers of the language to enforce a set of behaviors to be implemented in various JS engines. Is that correct?

No, this is not correct. Things like "Math" etc. are objects containing functions. If you use for eyample "Math.pow(...)" you just execute the function stored in the "Math" object. Check this example:

var Math = {};
Math.prototype.pow = function(){
 alert("stuff");
}

var ShapeInspections = { isSymmetrical: function (s) { // determine if shape is symmetrical }, numAngles: function (s) { // return the number of angles } } A purely contrived example, but is it anti-idomatic to name the "module" this way?

It's okay to name your objects like this. As already discussed "Math" is also just an object and follows these naming conventions.

To make things clear for the interface keyword:

The following tokens are also considered to be FutureReservedWords when they occur within strict mode code (see 10.1.1). The occurrence of any of these tokens within strict mode code in any context where the occurrence of a FutureReservedWord would produce an error must also produce an equivalent error:

implements let private public yield interface package protected static

It's just reserved cause it's "may" needed in the future. So don't worry too much about it :) http://www.ecma-international.org/ecma-262/5.1/#sec-7.6

0

Do not confuse the "interfaces" that are specified in IDL with the interface keyword.

The latter is reserved for potential future use, but is not yet actually used in ECMAScript (not even in ES6).

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