I am studying for the Spring Core certification and I have a doubt related about how correctly declare a new FileSystemXmlApplicationContext into a Spring 4 application.

I know that, into my main() method I could have something like this:

ApplicationContext context = new FileSystemXmlApplicationContext("classpath:mycompany.mydivision.myapplication.application.config.xml", "file:test-infra-config.xml");

So, correct me if I am sayng wrong assertion, this line create the Spring Application Context (the object from which I will get my bean) from 2 differents files that contains the beans definitions for my app, respectivelly named config.xml and test-infra-config.xml.

My doubts are: what exactly means that the first one is taken from the classpath and the second one from the file?

I think that the second one path is relative to the the JVM working directory and the first one from the application classpath (definied in the project, or what?)

My doubts are: in Spring 4 are the use of the classpath: and of the file: prefix mandatory?

From what I have understand I can omit the file: prefix but not the classpath: prefix (but I am not sure if it is true in the Spring 3 version or if it is changing something in the 4 version). If it is true why I can omit the file: prefix but not the classpath: prefix?

Tnx

  • because file: is the default one. meaning if you don't put prefix, the default value is file: – Vyncent Apr 13 '15 at 8:55

A lot of questions:

I think that the second one path is relative to the the JVM working directory and

correct


the first one from the application classpath (definied in the project, or what?)

it is the classpath that is used by the JVM when running the application application


My doubts are: in Spring 4 are the use of the classpath: and of the file: prefix mandatory?

The JavaDoc of FileSystemXmlApplicationContext starts with

Standalone XML application context, taking the context definition files from the file system or from URLs, interpreting plain paths as relative file system locations (e.g. "mydir/myfile.txt"). Useful for test harnesses as well as for standalone environments.

NOTE: Plain paths will always be interpreted as relative to the current VM working directory, even if they start with a slash. (This is consistent with the semantics in a Servlet container.) Use an explicit "file:" prefix to enforce an absolute file path.


From what I have understand I can omit the file: prefix but not the classpath: prefix (but I am not sure if it is true in the Spring 3 version or if it is changing something in the 4 version).

correct (there is no change between Spring 3 and 4 (see javadoc))


If it is true why I can omit the file: prefix but not the classpath: prefix?

Because you can have only one default value: when you have not specified whether the path refere to the file(system) or classpath then spring must decide where to search for the file - and they decided that they tread this as a file(system) reference

(I can also imagine that this is maybe because of some history and backwards compatible, maybe the first versions of Spring did only support the file way with out any prefix at this time. - but this is a guess without knowlege)

I think you should take a look at the Resources documentation and a lot of your questions will be answered.

There you'll find that the implementation of the ApplicationContext you are using is defining the specific Resource type to interpret your provided string resource locations as unless a prefix to the string is applied.

So for instance if:

ApplicationContext ctx = new ClassPathXmlApplicationContext("my/appCtx.xml");

a ClassPathResource will be used to load the resource location. It will be looking at the classpath of JVM classpath of your application.

Alternatively if:

ApplicationContext ctx = new FileSystemXmlApplicationContext("my/appCtx.xml");

then the ctx file is retrieved from filesystem location. Unless you force it in the string location with a prefix to look at the classpath instead:

ApplicationContext ctx = new FileSystemXmlApplicationContext("classpath:my/appCtx.xml");

So going back to your example now:

ApplicationContext context = new FileSystemXmlApplicationContext("classpath:mycompany.mydivision.myapplication.application.config.xml", "file:test-infra-config.xml");

So in essence you are identifying with prefix directly on the locator strings the method of the lookup. If you left the file prefix out of the second string, it would have been inferred by the implemetation of your application context.

So to summarize, not finding prefix in front of resource locator strings doesn't mean it's an advanced feature of Spring 4 compared say to Spring 3, but rather it is using under the scenes a Resource based on the implementation of your application context.

ps. As far as Spring 3 and 4 are concerned, there is no discrepancy on the above.

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