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I have a problem with generalize my Interpreter design pattern. The BNF I would like to implement is:
<expression> ::= <expression> " AND " <expression> | <literal>
<literal> ::= "A" | "B" | 1 | 2

I'm talking about the following design pattern: Interpreter

The trick was that, I wanted to allow for LiteralExpression for return both int, and string type, but only string for Expression. That doesn't work, because that violates Liskov substitution principle. Next I tried to make the base class more generic. That looked good, and the "only string" version was compiling, I have added the int instances of LiteralExpression to the main. The code doesn't compile saying
no matching function for call to Expression<std::string>::Expression(LiteralExpression<int>&, LiteralExpression<int>&)

I think the problem is that, the
Expression(Expression const &leftExpression, Expression const rightExpression)
constructor doesn't allow to have different template type of left and right expression than the T it was constructed with. I would have to exactly implement

Expression(Expression<int> const &leftExpression,
           Expression<int> const &rightExpression)  
Expression(Expression<int> const &leftExpression,
           Expression<string> const &rightExpression)  
Expression(Expression<string> const &leftExpression,
           Expression<int> const &rightExpression)  
Expression(Expression<string> const &leftExpression,
           Expression<string> const &rightExpression)  

versions. That is what I want to avoid. How can I do that?
In the constructor the << should take care of different types for me.

I have checked on the stack overflow comments that are somewhat related to my problem. I tried to understand and apply type erasure, but couldn't make it.

I tried to make GetResult()'s type in Expression and LiteralExpression covariant (standard §10.3 [class.virtual]/p7), so it's pointer. Didn't help (Is it totally unrelated?).

Sorry for the long post. Please help.

My code looks like this:

// main.cpp  

#include <iostream>
#include "LiteralExpression.h"
using std::cout;
using std::endl;
int main() {
    LiteralExpression<string> a("A");
    LiteralExpression<string> b("B");
    Expression<string> shortExpression(a, b);
    cout << *shortExpression.GetResult() << endl;
    LiteralExpression<int> one(1);
    LiteralExpression<int> two(2);
    Expression<string> shortExpression2(one, two);
    cout << *shortExpression2.GetResult() << endl;
    return 0;
}

// LiteralExpression.h

#ifndef LITERALEXPRESSION_H_
#define LITERALEXPRESSION_H_
#include "Expression.h"

template<class T>
class LiteralExpression: public Expression<T> {
public:
    LiteralExpression(string literal) {
        this->_result = (literal == "A" || literal == "B") ?  new string(literal) : new string("");
    }

    LiteralExpression(int literal) {
        this->_result = (literal == 1 || literal == 2) ? new int(literal) : new int(0);
    }
    virtual ~LiteralExpression() {
        delete this->_result;
    }
    virtual T *GetResult() const {
        return this->_result;
    }
protected:
    T *_result;
};

#endif /* LITERALEXPRESSION_H_ */

// Expression.h:

#ifndef EXPRESSION_H_
#define EXPRESSION_H_
#include <string>
#include <sstream>
using std::string;
using std::stringstream;

template<class T>
class Expression {
public:
    virtual ~Expression() {
        delete this->_result;
    }

    Expression(Expression const &leftExpression, Expression const &rightExpression) {
        stringstream result;
        result << *(leftExpression.GetResult()) << " AND " << *(rightExpression.GetResult());
        this->_result = new string(result.str());
    }

    // making it more generic by changing from
    // virtual string *GetResult() const {
    // to
    virtual T *GetResult() const {
        return this->_result;
    }

protected:
    T *_result;
    Expression() {
        this->_result = 0;
    }
};

#endif /* EXPRESSION_H_ */
  • I think this is a design problem - you really shouldn't be templating if you are limited to one or two classes. If expression can only be of <string> type, why are you trying to make it generalized? – dwcanillas Apr 13 '15 at 16:26
  • You might be better of using inheritance rather than class templates. – R Sahu Apr 13 '15 at 16:34
  • 1
    What prevents you from making the Expression-constructor a template member function like this: template <typename T1,typename T2> Expression(Expression<T1> const &leftExpression, Expression<T2> const &rightExpression)? In case you don't need dynamic dispatch, this should do the trick. But usually, I would go for an inheritance solution, like Sahu suggested as well. – Julian Apr 13 '15 at 17:15
  • Thank You for the formatting help! The design is not what I would use in any live code. It's only play with design patterns. If I play with the code I can memorize it better. At the start I'm limited to one-two classes. That was the step, when I progressed to generalization/ to templates. – ntohl Apr 14 '15 at 11:12
0

Your LiteralExpression class uses CRTP

template<class T>
class LiteralExpression : public Expression<T>

and both one and two have Expression<int> as base class

LiteralExpression<int> one(1);
LiteralExpression<int> two(2);

When passing them to an Expression<string> constructor

Expression<string> shortExpression2(one, two);

// where

template<class T>
class Expression {
  Expression(Expression const &leftExpression, Expression const &rightExpression) {

you're asking the same thing as:

template<class T>
class Expression {
  Expression(Expression<T> const &leftExpression, Expression<T> const &rightExpression) {

since 14.6.2.1/1 says

A name refers to the current instantiation if it is

— in the definition of a class template, a nested class of a class template, a member of a class template, or a member of a nested class of a class template, the injected-class-name (Clause 9) of the class template or nested class, [...]

and obviously Expression<int> != Expression<string>.

As a solution, in addition to resorting to a simpler inheritance design, regarding templates you could rather do something like

template<class U, class V> // Base classes could be anything and this works
Expression(Expression<U> const &leftExpression, Expression<V> const &rightExpression) {
| improve this answer | |
  • Thank You! That was what I suspected. Julian and You helped. About the side question: Now I understand CRTP and return type covariancy is not related. – ntohl Apr 14 '15 at 11:30

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