1

In the following HTML/CSS there are three boxes; one red, one blue and one yellow. If you mouse over the blue box, it is translated towards the user in the z-axis with the CSS transform: translate3d(0, 0, 5px). This should mean the blue box is drawn in front of the yellow and red box.

HTML

<div id="red"></div>
<div id="blue"></div>
<div id="yellow"></div>

CSS

div {
    margin: 20px;

    width: 100px;
    height: 150px;

    -webkit-transform-style: preserve-3d;
    -moz-transform-style: preserve-3d;
    transform-style: preserve-3d;

    -webkit-transition: 0.5s;
    -moz-transition: 0.5s;
    transition: 0.5s;

    -webkit-transition-timing-function: ease-out;
    -moz-transition-timing-function: ease-out;
    transition-timing-function: ease-out;

    -webkit-transform: perspective(10px) translate3d(0, 0, 0);
    -moz-transform: perspective(10px) translate3d(0, 0, 0);
    transform: perspective(10px) translate3d(0, 0, 0);
}

#red {
    background-color: red;
}

#blue {
    background-color: blue;
}

#yellow {
    background-color: yellow;
}

#blue:hover {           
    -webkit-transform: perspective(10px) translate3d(0, 0, 5px);
    -moz-transform: perspective(10px) translate3d(0, 0, 5px);
    transform: perspective(10px) translate3d(0, 0, 5px);
}

jsfiddle

Firefox

Behaves as expected

firefox

Chrome

Does NOT behave as expected. The yellow box is drawn in front!

chrome

Is this a bug? Is there a work around? How can I fix this jsfiddle?

2
  • 1
    You can work around it with z-index, but I'd say it's a bug.
    – Scott
    Apr 13 '15 at 17:52
  • 2
    Thanks. I tried working around with z-index, but it was the position: relative; that I was missing. If you post as an answer, I will accept!
    – theon
    Apr 13 '15 at 19:04
3

As you suggested :)

It seems Chrome ignores the z value of transformations when it renders a page, instead reverting to the Painter's Algorithm (what is defined first is drawn first). You can get around this by forcing the #blue div to have a greater z-index than its siblings, and giving each sibling position: relative to make the changes take effect:

#red, #yellow, #blue {
    position: relative;
}

#red, #yellow {
    z-index: 2;
}

#blue {
    z-index: 3;
}
2

Firstly, the z-index solution (by Scott) is a much better solution, but this is an alternate one with an explanation of why it occurs this way:

#blue is in it's own composited layer (when you hover over it/and/or it is transitioning) compared to #yellow and #red. You could simply add a container and add a transformation which places #blue, #yellow, and #red in the same composited layer at which point the expected effect (where transformation along the z axis actually places an element in front) will be respected:

EDIT This answer does have the added advantage that now the z-index (or, whichever element is on top) will be the element that has the higher z translation (hover over the blue or yellow divs).

/* place .container (and descendents) in the same composited layer */
.container {
    transform: translateZ(0);
}

div {
    margin: 20px;
    
    width: 100px;
    height: 150px;
    
    -webkit-transform-style: preserve-3d;
    -moz-transform-style: preserve-3d;
    transform-style: preserve-3d;
    
    -webkit-transition: 0.5s;
    -moz-transition: 0.5s;
    transition: 0.5s;
    
    -webkit-transition-timing-function: ease-out;
    -moz-transition-timing-function: ease-out;
    transition-timing-function: ease-out;
    
    -webkit-transform: perspective(10px) translate3d(0, 0, 0);
    -moz-transform: perspective(10px) translate3d(0, 0, 0);
    transform: perspective(10px) translate3d(0, 0, 0);
}

#red {
    background-color: red;
}

#blue {
    background-color: blue;
}

#yellow {
    background-color: yellow;
}

/* now you can see that whatever has the higher z translation will appear in front */
#yellow:hover,
#blue:hover {	
    -webkit-transform: perspective(10px) translate3d(0, 0, 5px);
    -moz-transform: perspective(10px) translate3d(0, 0, 5px);
    transform: perspective(10px) translate3d(0, 0, 5px);
}
<div class="container">
  <div id="red"></div>
  <div id="blue"></div>
  <div id="yellow"></div>
</div>

2
  • I'd say this answer is much better, I didn't even think of looking at the layers. Nice work!
    – Scott
    Apr 13 '15 at 19:18
  • 1
    @ScottKaye - it's actually not, because you're promoting #blue, #yellow, and #red to be rendered on the GPU (more memory), when they don't need to be. Developers should be careful to promote layers to the GPU only when absolutely necessary, because it does come at a cost.
    – Adam
    Apr 13 '15 at 19:20

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