38

I am sure making a silly mistake but I can't figure what:

In SQL Server 2005 I am trying select all customers except those who have made a reservation before 2 AM.

When I run this query:

SELECT idCustomer FROM reservations 
WHERE idCustomer NOT IN 
  (SELECT distinct idCustomer FROM reservations 
   WHERE DATEPART ( hour, insertDate) < 2)

I get 0 results.

But

SELECT idCustomer FROM reservations 

returns 152.000 results and the "NOT IN" part:

SELECT distinct idCustomer FROM reservations 
WHERE DATEPART ( hour, insertDate) < 2

returns only 284 rows

  • Why would you put a Distinct in you NOT IN? Is the 5 in (1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4)? In doesn't care if there are duplicates. – Mark Brady Nov 17 '08 at 18:18
  • 1
    Sure, I was getting a little desperate and trying everything :) – Santiago Corredoira Nov 17 '08 at 20:23
65
SELECT distinct idCustomer FROM reservations
WHERE DATEPART ( hour, insertDate) < 2
  and idCustomer is not null

Make sure your list parameter does not contain null values.

Here's an explanation:

WHERE field1 NOT IN (1, 2, 3, null)

is the same as:

WHERE NOT (field1 = 1 OR field1 = 2 OR field1 = 3 OR field1 = null)
  • That last comparision evaluates to null.
  • That null is OR'd with the rest of the boolean expression, yielding null. (*)
  • null is negated, yielding null.
  • null is not true - the where clause only keeps true rows, so all rows are filtered.

(*) Edit: this explanation is pretty good, but I wish to address one thing to stave off future nit-picking. (TRUE OR NULL) would evaluate to TRUE. This is relevant if field1 = 3, for example. That TRUE value would be negated to FALSE and the row would be filtered.

  • That was it, thanks! I still don't understand why. Not null values shouldn't be filtered by the null ones, right? – Santiago Corredoira Nov 17 '08 at 17:12
  • Great explanation David, many thanks! – Santiago Corredoira Nov 17 '08 at 17:14
6

It's always dangerous to have NULL in the IN list - it often behaves as expected for the IN but not for the NOT IN:

IF 1 NOT IN (1, 2, 3, NULL) PRINT '1 NOT IN (1, 2, 3, NULL)'
IF 1 NOT IN (2, 3, NULL) PRINT '1 NOT IN (2, 3, NULL)'
IF 1 NOT IN (2, 3) PRINT '1 NOT IN (2, 3)' -- Prints
IF 1 IN (1, 2, 3, NULL) PRINT '1 IN (1, 2, 3, NULL)' -- Prints
IF 1 IN (2, 3, NULL) PRINT '1 IN (2, 3, NULL)'
IF 1 IN (2, 3) PRINT '1 IN (2, 3)'
  • Good point. However, I've never run into a case where using null in the in-list gave a more correct answer. – Amy B Nov 17 '08 at 19:43
  • 1
    Exactly - the problem is when the list is dynamic and you don't know the NULL is there and you take an IN and change it to a NOT IN. – Cade Roux Nov 17 '08 at 22:09
2

Given it's SQL 2005, you can also try this It's similar to Oracle's MINUS command (opposite of UNION)

But I would also suggest adding the DATEPART ( hour, insertDate) column for debug

SELECT idCustomer FROM reservations 
EXCEPT
SELECT idCustomer FROM reservations WHERE DATEPART ( hour, insertDate) < 2
0
SELECT Reservations.idCustomer FROM Reservations (nolock)
LEFT OUTER JOIN @reservations ExcludedReservations (nolock) ON Reservations.idCustomer=ExcludedReservations.idCustomer AND DATEPART(hour, ExcludedReservations.insertDate) < 2
WHERE ExcludedReservations.idCustomer IS NULL AND Reservations.idCustomer IS NOT NULL
GROUP BY Reservations.idCustomer

[Update: Added additional criteria to handle idCustomer being NULL, which was apparently the main issue the original poster had]

  • Hi Kevin, the problem was that customerId was nullable and as @David pointed but many thanks anyway! – Santiago Corredoira Nov 17 '08 at 17:30
  • Ok. Added in the additional criteria just for completeness :-P I don't have the data to try it out, but I'd be curious to see the difference in EXECUTION plans of NOT IN versus the OUTER JOIN. Anyhow, glad your issue is resolved. – Kevin Fairchild Nov 17 '08 at 17:36
0

Sorry if I've missed the point, but wouldn't the following do what you want on it's own?

SELECT distinct idCustomer FROM reservations 
WHERE DATEPART(hour, insertDate) >= 2
  • I was thinking the same thing... However, if a customer has two reservation, one before 2Am and one after, yours will include him, and his would not. – James Curran Nov 17 '08 at 17:53
  • Ah, that makes sense, my brain's not firing on all cylinders today! – JamesieAB Nov 17 '08 at 19:11
-1
SELECT MIN(A.maxsal) secondhigh
FROM (
      SELECT TOP 2 MAX(EmployeeBasic) maxsal
      FROM M_Salary
      GROUP BY EmployeeBasic
      ORDER BY EmployeeBasic DESC
     ) A
  • 3
    Welcome to SO. You might want to read this stackoverflow.com/help/how-to-answer on how to compose good answers. Code only answers are not very helpful, you could add a brief description of how it soles the problem. – thebenman Jan 19 '17 at 5:54
-1
select * from table_name where id=5 and column_name not in ('sandy,'pandy');
  • 1
    Welcome to SO. You might want to read this stackoverflow.com/help/how-to-answer on how to compose good answers. Code only answers are not very helpful, you could add a brief description of how it soles the problem – GhostCat Jul 4 '17 at 18:31

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