153

For example if I have two objects:

var foo = {
  x: "bar",
  y: "baz"
}

and

var oof = {}

and I wanted to transfer the x and y values from foo to oof. Is there a way to do that using the es6 destructuring syntax?

perhaps something like:

oof{x,y} = foo
4
  • 10
    If you want to copy all properties Object.assign(oof, foo) – elclanrs Apr 14 '15 at 6:44
  • Lots of destructing examples here on MDN, but I do not see the one you're asking about. – jfriend00 Apr 14 '15 at 6:55
  • Hmm I couldn't find one either.. – majorBummer Apr 14 '15 at 6:57
  • See my answer below for a two line solution without Object.assign – Zfalen Jun 23 '17 at 18:05

16 Answers 16

144

While ugly and a bit repetitive, you can do

({x: oof.x, y: oof.y} = foo);

which will read the two values of the foo object, and write them to their respective locations on the oof object.

Personally I'd still rather read

oof.x = foo.x;
oof.y = foo.y;

or

['x', 'y'].forEach(prop => oof[prop] = foo[prop]);

though.

9
  • 3
    The alternative ['x', 'y'].forEach(prop => oof[prop] = foo[prop]); as I see, is the only one D.R.Y (do not repeat yourself), till now. "DRY" would be indeed useful in the case of several keys to be mapped. You would only need to update one place. Maybe I am wrong. Thanks anyway! – Vladimir Brasil Mar 21 '17 at 20:16
  • 1
    Third example is DRY, but you have to use strings as the keys, which javascript normally does implicitly. Not convinced that's less of a nuisance than: const {x, y} = foo; const oof = {x, y}; – Jeff Lowery Nov 6 '17 at 20:58
  • Can someone show me in jsfiddle where the first suggestion works? It's not working here on chrome: jsfiddle.net/7mh399ow – techguy2000 Dec 22 '17 at 16:18
  • @techguy2000 You forgot the semicolon after var oof = {};. – loganfsmyth Dec 22 '17 at 18:06
  • In the first code, shouldnt be ({x: oof.x, y: oof.y} = foo) ? I think you've put an extra f in oof. – Sornii Sep 7 '18 at 11:47
40

No, destructuring does not support member expressions in shorthands but only plain propertynames at the current time. There have been talks about such on esdiscuss, but no proposals will make it into ES6.

You might be able to use Object.assign however - if you don't need all own properties, you still can do

var foo = …,
    oof = {};
{
    let {x, y} = foo;
    Object.assign(oof, {x, y})
}
4
  • 3
    @loganfsmyth, your example isn't working for me at least in my tests with node 4.2.2. with --harmony_destructuring enabled. I see "SyntaxError: Unexpected token ." – jpierson Feb 17 '16 at 14:30
  • @loganfsmyth you should submit a proper answer as this is a very useful comment imo. – Sulliwane Nov 16 '16 at 2:40
  • @Sulliwane: He's done so (now). Bergi, would probably be best to update the answer to call out that you can use member expressions as shown by Logan. (Is it really true that the spec changed that much between April and June 2015?) – T.J. Crowder Mar 26 '18 at 13:55
  • @T.J.Crowder No, I don't think it changed, I guess I was talking about {oof.x, oof.y} = foo. Or maybe I really had missed it. – Bergi Mar 26 '18 at 14:02
37

IMO this is the easiest way to accomplish what you're looking for:

let { prop1, prop2, prop3 } = someObject;
let data = { prop1, prop2, prop3 };

  // data === { prop1: someObject.prop1, ... }

Basically, destructure into variables and then use the initializer shorthand to make a new object. No need for Object.assign

I think this is the most readable way, anyways. You can hereby select the exact props out of someObject that you want. If you have an existing object you just want to merge the props into, do something like this:

let { prop1, prop2, prop3 } = someObject;
let data = Object.assign(otherObject, { prop1, prop2, prop3 });
    // Makes a new copy, or...
Object.assign(otherObject, { prop1, prop2, prop3 });
    // Merges into otherObject

Another, arguably cleaner, way to write it is:

let { prop1, prop2, prop3 } = someObject;
let newObject = { prop1, prop2, prop3 };

// Merges your selected props into otherObject
Object.assign(otherObject, newObject);

I use this for POST requests a lot where I only need a few pieces of discrete data. But, I agree there should be a one liner for doing this.

EDIT: P.S. - I recently learned you can use ultra destructuring in the first step to pull nested values out of complex objects! For instance...

let { prop1, 
      prop2: { somethingDeeper }, 
      prop3: { 
         nested1: {
            nested2
         } 
      } = someObject;
let data = { prop1, somethingDeeper, nested2 };

Plus, you could use spread operator instead of Object.assign when making a new object:

const { prop1, prop2, prop3 } = someObject;
let finalObject = {...otherObject, prop1, prop2, prop3 };

Or...

const { prop1, prop2, prop3 } = someObject;
const intermediateObject = { prop1, prop2, prop3 };
const finalObject = {...otherObject, ...intermediateObject };
3
  • I like this approach, pragmatic. – Jesse Feb 8 '18 at 20:37
  • 2
    This is what I do but it's not very dry. I think what a lot of people really need is just an extract keys function. – jgmjgm Mar 21 '18 at 14:05
  • @jgmjgm yeah, it would be nice to have one built in but I guess thats not too hard to write either. – Zfalen Apr 3 '18 at 19:52
14

Other than Object.assign there is the object spread syntax which is a Stage 2 proposal for ECMAScript.

    var foo = {
      x: "bar",
      y: "baz"
    }
    
    var oof = { z: "z" }
    
    oof =  {...oof, ...foo }
    
    console.log(oof)

    /* result 
    {
      "x": "bar",
      "y": "baz",
      "z": "z"
    }
    */

But to use this feature you need to use stage-2 or transform-object-rest-spread plugin for babel. Here is a demo on babel with stage-2

1
  • 10
    This doesn't actually set the properties on the existing object, but rather creates a new object containing all the properties of both. – Matt Browne Jan 3 '17 at 12:29
9

BabelJS plugin

If you are using BabelJS you can now activate my plugin babel-plugin-transform-object-from-destructuring (see npm package for installation and usage).

I had the same issue described in this thread and for me it was very exhausting when you create an object from a destructuring expression, especially when you have to rename, add or remove a property. With this plugin maintaining such scenarios gets much more easier for you.

Object example

let myObject = {
  test1: "stringTest1",
  test2: "stringTest2",
  test3: "stringTest3"
};
let { test1, test3 } = myObject,
  myTest = { test1, test3 };

can be written as:

let myTest = { test1, test3 } = myObject;

Array example

let myArray = ["stringTest1", "stringTest2", "stringTest3"];
let [ test1, , test3 ] = myArray,
  myTest = [ test1, test3 ];

can be written as:

let myTest = [ test1, , test3 ] = myArray;
2
  • This is precisely what I wanted. Thank you! – garrettmaring Nov 5 '19 at 19:21
  • let myTest = { test1, test3 } = myObject; doesn't work – Eatdoku Jul 28 '20 at 21:52
4

It's totally possible. Just not in one statement.

var foo = {
    x: "bar",
    y: "baz"
};
var oof = {};
({x: oof.x, y: oof.y} = foo); // {x: "bar", y: "baz"}

(Do note the parenthesis around the statement.) But keep in mind legibility is more important than code-golfing :).

Source: http://exploringjs.com/es6/ch_destructuring.html#sec_assignment-targets

3

You can just use restructuring for that like this:

const foo = {x:"a", y:"b"};
const {...oof} = foo; // {x:"a", y:"b"} 

Or merge both objects if oof has values:

const foo = {x:"a", y:"b"};
let oof = {z:"c"}
oof = Object.assign({}, oof, foo)
4
  • I think this first case is exactly what I was looking for. I tried it out in the chrome console and it seems to work. Cheers! @campsafari – majorBummer Oct 3 '19 at 20:42
  • 1
    @majorBummer Your call in the end, but I'd consider approach to not actually answer your question, because these both create new objects, rather than adding properties to existing objects like your title asks. – loganfsmyth Oct 3 '19 at 23:21
  • That's a good point @loganfsmyth. I think I was just excited by the method campSafari brought up because I hadn't realized that that was possible. – majorBummer Oct 6 '19 at 23:11
  • 1
    If you dont mind creating a new object you could just do oof = {...oof, ...foo} – Joshua Coady Nov 11 '19 at 23:03
2

You can return the destructured object in an arrow function, and use Object.assign() to assign it to a variable.

const foo = {
  x: "bar",
  y: "baz"
}

const oof = Object.assign({}, () => ({ x, y } = foo));
2

You can destruct an object assigning directly to another object attribute.

Working example:

let user = {};
[user.name, user.username] = "Stack Overflow".split(' ');
document.write(`
1st attr: ${user.name} <br /> 
2nd attr: ${user.username}`);

You can work with destructing using variables with the same name of object attribute you want to catch, this way you don't need to do:

let user = { name: 'Mike' }
let { name: name } = user;

Use this way:

let user = { name: 'Mike' }
let { name } = user;

The same way you can set new values to object structures if they have the same attribute name.

Look this working example:

// The object to be destructed
let options = {
  title: "Menu",
  width: 100,
  height: 200
};

// Destructing
let {width: w, height: h, title} = options;

// Feedback
document.write(title + "<br />");  // Menu
document.write(w + "<br />");      // 100
document.write(h);                 // 200

1

Try

    var a = {a1:1, a2: 2, a3: 3};
    var b = {b1:1, b2: 2, b3: 3};
    
    const newVar = (() => ({a1, a2, b1, b2})).bind({...a, ...b});
    const val = newVar();
    console.log({...val});
    // print: Object { a1: 1, a2: 2, b1: 1, b2: 2 }

or

    console.log({...(() => ({a1, a2, b1, b2})).bind({...a, ...b})()});

0

I came up with this method:

exports.pick = function pick(src, props, dest={}) {
    return Object.keys(props).reduce((d,p) => {
        if(typeof props[p] === 'string') {
            d[props[p]] = src[p];
        } else if(props[p]) {
            d[p] = src[p];
        }
        return d;
    },dest);
};

Which you can use like this:

let cbEvents = util.pick(this.props.events, {onFocus:1,onBlur:1,onCheck:'onChange'});
let wrapEvents = util.pick(this.props.events, {onMouseEnter:1,onMouseLeave:1});

i.e., you can pick which properties you want out and put them into a new object. Unlike _.pick you can also rename them at the same time.

If you want to copy the props onto an existing object, just set the dest arg.

0

This is kind of cheating, but you can do something like this...

const originalObject = {
  hello: 'nurse',
  meaningOfLife: 42,
  your: 'mom',
};

const partialObject = (({ hello, your }) => {
  return { hello, your };
})(originalObject);

console.log(partialObject); // ​​​​​{ hello: 'nurse', your: 'mom' }​​​​​

In practice, I think you'd rarely want to use that though. The following is MUCH more clear... but not nearly as fun.

const partialObject = {
  hello: originalObject.hello,
  your: originalObject.your,
};

Another completely different route, which includes mucking with the prototype (careful now...):

if (!Object.prototype.pluck) {
  Object.prototype.pluck = function(...props) {
    return props.reduce((destObj, prop) => {
      destObj[prop] = this[prop];

      return destObj;
    }, {});
  }
}

const originalObject = {
  hello: 'nurse',
  meaningOfLife: 42,
  your: 'mom',
};

const partialObject2 = originalObject.pluck('hello', 'your');

console.log(partialObject2); // { hello: 'nurse', your: 'mom' }
0

This is the most readable and shortest solution I could come up with:

let props = { 
  isValidDate: 'yes',
  badProp: 'no!',
};

let { isValidDate } = props;
let newProps = { isValidDate };

console.log(newProps);

It will output { isValidDate: 'yes' }

It would be nice to some day be able to say something like let newProps = ({ isValidDate } = props) but unfortunately it is not something ES6 supports.

0

You can use JSON class methods to achieve it as follows

const foo = {
   x: "bar",
   y: "baz"
};

const oof = JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(foo, ['x','y']));
// output -> {x: "bar", y: "baz"}

Pass properties that need to be added to the resulting object as second argument to stringify function in an array format.

MDN Doc for JSON.stringify

0

This works in chrome 53.0.2785.89

    let foo = {
      x: "bar",
      y: "baz"
    };
    
    let oof = {x, y} = foo;
    
    console.log(`oof: ${JSON.stringify(oof)}`);
    
    //prints oof: { "x": "bar", "y": "baz"}

3
  • 8
    Sadly it seems like oof just receives a reference of foo and bypasses the whole destructuring (at least in Chrome). oof === foo and let oof = { x } = foo yet returns { x, y } – Theo.T Sep 14 '16 at 22:34
  • @Theo.T good catch. that's a bummer, i'll have to find another way – user1577390 Sep 22 '16 at 21:43
  • 1
    This ones worth keeping just for demonstrating how JS can be confusing. – jgmjgm Mar 21 '18 at 14:09
0

It's not a beautiful way, nor I recommend it, but it's possible this way, just for knowledge.

   const myObject = {
      name: 'foo',
      surname: 'bar',
      year: 2018
    };

    const newObject = ['name', 'surname'].reduce(
      (prev, curr) => (prev[curr] = myObject[curr], prev),
      {},
    );

    console.log(JSON.stringify(newObject)); // {"name":"foo","surname":"bar"}

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