1

I have a file like this:

$account = [
   'user1',
   'anotheruser1',
   'companyaccount',
]

$password = [
   'aokroae',
   '43t03it0i0i',
   '430it935ti',
]

I need to create a bash script which greps e.g "$account = [" and adds the new user at the end of the row within the $account. Which would be the best way to do this?

So, if I wanted to add the user "Michael" via a bash script, the expected output would then be for the $account:

$account = [
   'user1',
   'anotheruser1',
   'companyaccount',
   'Michael',
] 
  • 1
    What's your expected output? – Avinash Raj Apr 14 '15 at 10:01
  • Updated the question so it should be more clear. – Kevin Apr 14 '15 at 10:05
  • Is the order of the user list important, or would it be okay to insert the new user at the top of the list? – Wintermute Apr 14 '15 at 10:07
1

Using awk

This adds Michael to the end of the list:

awk '/^[$]account/,/]/{ if (/]/) {print "   '\''Michael'\'',";}} 1' file
$account = [
   'user1',
   'anotheruser1',
   'companyaccount',
   'Michael',
]

$password = [
   'aokroae',
   '43t03it0i0i',
   '430it935ti',
]

How it works

  • /^[$]account/, /]/

    This defines a range of lines starting with $account and ending with ]

  • if (/]/) {print " '\''Michael'\'',";}

    For lines in the range, if the line contains ], then add Michael.

  • 1

    This is awk's cryptic shorthand for print-the-line.

Using sed

$ sed "/^[$]account/,/]/ { /]/ s/^/   'Michael',\n/}" file
$account = [
   'user1',
   'anotheruser1',
   'companyaccount',
   'Michael',
]

$password = [
   'aokroae',
   '43t03it0i0i',
   '430it935ti',
]

How it works

The logic here is quite similar to that used in the awk code:

  • /^[$]account/,/]/

    This defines a range of lines starting with $account and ending with ]

  • { /]/ s/^/ 'Michael',\n/}

    For the lines in the range, this tests to see if the line contains ]. If so, then Michael is substituted in at the beginning of the line.

    We don't need to tell sed explicitly the it should print the line. sed does this by default.

  • Thank you! The other answers were good too but your answer described how awk and sed were used. – Kevin Apr 15 '15 at 9:49
2

If you could add the information to the beginning of the list, it would be easier:

sed -e "/\$account = \[/a\ \ \ 'newuser',"

a just adds a new line after the one that matched.

To add it to the end, you can use sed, too:

sed -e '/[$]account = \[/bi;b;:i {n;/\]/{i \   '\'newuser\',$'\nb};bi}'

Explanation:

  • bi branches to the label i if $account is matched.
  • otherwise, b just starts processing the next line.
  • the i label introduces a block that reads the next line (n), if it finds ], it inserts (i) the new value and starts processing the next line normally (b).
  • otherwise, the i block processes the next line (bi).
1
# Variable assignation for generic use
Section="account"
Value="NewUser"

# value integration in section
sed "
# filter to only good section (just print for others)
/^[$]${Section} = \\[/,/]/ !b

# To add at begin
   /^[$]${Section} = \\[/ a\\
   '${Value}'
# To add at the end
   /]/ i\\
   '${Value}'

    " YourFile
  • select the part of code if you prefer at begin or end of the section (comment the 2 following line or delete them)
  • same code to add in different section
  • don't forget that Section value is a regex value
  • it use the i\ and a\ for insert and append a line of text (the next line) and filter to select the good part of text to apply
1

simplest thing to do is keep the previous line and then replace it's text with the new text when necessary so you retain indentation:

$ awk -v srch='$account' -v add='Michael' '
    $1 == srch { f = 1 }
    f && /]/ { sub(/[^\047[:space:]]+/,add,prev); print prev; f = 0 }
    { print; prev = $0 }
' file
$account = [
   'user1',
   'anotheruser1',
   'companyaccount',
   'Michael',
]

$password = [
   'aokroae',
   '43t03it0i0i',
   '430it935ti',
]

The above will work in any awk and will always indent the added text so it lines up with the preceding line, no hard-coding of indentation necessary.

0

You can use this gnu-awk:

awk -v sq="'" -v RS='\\]\n' '/account =/{$0 = $0 "   " sq "Michael" sq "," ORS }
     {printf $0 RT}' file

$account = [
   'user1',
   'anotheruser1',
   'companyaccount',
   'Michael',
]

$password = [
   'aokroae',
   '43t03it0i0i',
   '430it935ti',
]

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