246

I have create the next Dictionary:

var postJSON = [ids[0]:answersArray[0], ids[1]:answersArray[1], ids[2]:answersArray[2]] as Dictionary

and I get:

[2: B, 1: A, 3: C]

So, how can I convert it to JSON?

1

16 Answers 16

297

Swift 3.0

With Swift 3, the name of NSJSONSerialization and its methods have changed, according to the Swift API Design Guidelines.

let dic = ["2": "B", "1": "A", "3": "C"]

do {
    let jsonData = try JSONSerialization.data(withJSONObject: dic, options: .prettyPrinted)
    // here "jsonData" is the dictionary encoded in JSON data

    let decoded = try JSONSerialization.jsonObject(with: jsonData, options: [])
    // here "decoded" is of type `Any`, decoded from JSON data

    // you can now cast it with the right type        
    if let dictFromJSON = decoded as? [String:String] {
        // use dictFromJSON
    }
} catch {
    print(error.localizedDescription)
}

Swift 2.x

do {
    let jsonData = try NSJSONSerialization.dataWithJSONObject(dic, options: NSJSONWritingOptions.PrettyPrinted)
    // here "jsonData" is the dictionary encoded in JSON data

    let decoded = try NSJSONSerialization.JSONObjectWithData(jsonData, options: [])
    // here "decoded" is of type `AnyObject`, decoded from JSON data

    // you can now cast it with the right type 
    if let dictFromJSON = decoded as? [String:String] {
        // use dictFromJSON
    }
} catch let error as NSError {
    print(error)
}

Swift 1

var error: NSError?
if let jsonData = NSJSONSerialization.dataWithJSONObject(dic, options: NSJSONWritingOptions.PrettyPrinted, error: &error) {
    if error != nil {
        println(error)
    } else {
        // here "jsonData" is the dictionary encoded in JSON data
    }
}

if let decoded = NSJSONSerialization.JSONObjectWithData(jsonData, options: nil, error: &error) as? [String:String] {
    if error != nil {
        println(error)
    } else {
        // here "decoded" is the dictionary decoded from JSON data
    }
}

5
  • 1
    I get the next [2: A, 1: A, 3: A]. But what about curly brackets? Apr 14, 2015 at 10:55
  • 1
    I don't understand your question. What curly brackets? You asked about encoding a dictionary in JSON, and that's my answer.
    – Eric Aya
    Apr 14, 2015 at 10:56
  • 2
    JSON curly brackets, like {"result":[{"body":"Question 3"}] } Apr 14, 2015 at 10:59
  • 2
    @OrkhanAlizade The above call to dataWithJSONObject would produce the "curly brackets" (i.e. the braces) as part of the resulting NSData object.
    – Rob
    Apr 14, 2015 at 16:36
  • 1
    thanks. side note - consider using d0 instead to abbreviate (dic)tionary.
    – johndpope
    Jul 21, 2016 at 19:15
204

You are making a wrong assumption. Just because the debugger/Playground shows your dictionary in square brackets (which is how Cocoa displays dictionaries) that does not mean that is the way the JSON output is formatted.

Here is example code that will convert a dictionary of strings to JSON:

Swift 3 version:

import Foundation

let dictionary = ["aKey": "aValue", "anotherKey": "anotherValue"]
if let theJSONData = try? JSONSerialization.data(
    withJSONObject: dictionary,
    options: []) {
    let theJSONText = String(data: theJSONData,
                               encoding: .ascii)
    print("JSON string = \(theJSONText!)")
}

To display the above in "pretty printed" format you'd change the options line to:

    options: [.prettyPrinted]

Or in Swift 2 syntax:

import Foundation
 
let dictionary = ["aKey": "aValue", "anotherKey": "anotherValue"]
let theJSONData = NSJSONSerialization.dataWithJSONObject(
  dictionary ,
  options: NSJSONWritingOptions(0),
  error: nil)
let theJSONText = NSString(data: theJSONData!,
  encoding: NSASCIIStringEncoding)
println("JSON string = \(theJSONText!)")

The output of that is

"JSON string = {"anotherKey":"anotherValue","aKey":"aValue"}"

Or in pretty format:

{
  "anotherKey" : "anotherValue",
  "aKey" : "aValue"
}

The dictionary is enclosed in curly braces in the JSON output, just as you'd expect.

EDIT:

In Swift 3/4 syntax, the code above looks like this:

  let dictionary = ["aKey": "aValue", "anotherKey": "anotherValue"]
    if let theJSONData = try?  JSONSerialization.data(
      withJSONObject: dictionary,
      options: .prettyPrinted
      ),
      let theJSONText = String(data: theJSONData,
                               encoding: String.Encoding.ascii) {
          print("JSON string = \n\(theJSONText)")
    }
  }
14
  • A regular Swift string works as well on theJSONText declaration.
    – Fred Faust
    Jan 13, 2016 at 19:58
  • @thefredelement, How do you convert NSData directly to a Swift string though? The data to string conversion is a function of NSString.
    – Duncan C
    Jan 14, 2016 at 15:09
  • I was implementing this method and used the data / encoding init on a Swift string, I'm not sure if that was available on Swift 1.x.
    – Fred Faust
    Jan 14, 2016 at 15:14
  • Saved my day. Thanks.
    – Shobhit C
    Oct 17, 2017 at 6:41
  • should be selected answer (y)
    – iBug
    Feb 12, 2018 at 11:24
84

Swift 5:

let dic = ["2": "B", "1": "A", "3": "C"]
let encoder = JSONEncoder()
if let jsonData = try? encoder.encode(dic) {
    if let jsonString = String(data: jsonData, encoding: .utf8) {
        print(jsonString)
    }
}

Note that keys and values must implement Codable. Strings, Ints, and Doubles (and more) are already Codable. See Encoding and Decoding Custom Types.

Also note: As mentioned in a comment, Any does not conform to Codable. It is likely still a good approach to adapt your data to become Codable so that you are making use of Swift typing (especially in the case that you are also going to decode any encoded json), and so that you can be more declarative about the outcome of your encoding.

1
  • 13
    Just for the future reference, this solution won't work if your dict is of type [String, Any]
    – nja
    Aug 20, 2020 at 10:52
37

My answer for your question is below

let dict = ["0": "ArrayObjectOne", "1": "ArrayObjecttwo", "2": "ArrayObjectThree"]

var error : NSError?

let jsonData = try! NSJSONSerialization.dataWithJSONObject(dict, options: NSJSONWritingOptions.PrettyPrinted)

let jsonString = NSString(data: jsonData, encoding: String.Encoding.utf8.rawValue)! as String

print(jsonString)

Answer is

{
  "0" : "ArrayObjectOne",
  "1" : "ArrayObjecttwo",
  "2" : "ArrayObjectThree"
}
32

Swift 4 Dictionary extension.

extension Dictionary {
    var jsonStringRepresentation: String? {
        guard let theJSONData = try? JSONSerialization.data(withJSONObject: self,
                                                            options: [.prettyPrinted]) else {
            return nil
        }

        return String(data: theJSONData, encoding: .ascii)
    }
}
4
  • This is a good and reusable way of solving the problem but a little explanation would help new comers to understand it better.
    – nilobarp
    Mar 19, 2019 at 22:00
  • Could this be applied if keys of the dictionary contains array of custom objects?
    – Larry Lo
    Apr 2, 2019 at 16:40
  • 3
    It is not good idea to use encoding: .ascii in public extension. .utf8 will be much safer!
    – ArtFeel
    Sep 10, 2019 at 15:40
  • this prints with escape characters is there anywhere to prevent that?
    – MikeG
    Feb 19, 2020 at 19:06
29

Sometimes it's necessary to print out server's response for debugging purposes. Here's a function I use:

extension Dictionary {

    var json: String {
        let invalidJson = "Not a valid JSON"
        do {
            let jsonData = try JSONSerialization.data(withJSONObject: self, options: .prettyPrinted)
            return String(bytes: jsonData, encoding: String.Encoding.utf8) ?? invalidJson
        } catch {
            return invalidJson
        }
    }

    func printJson() {
        print(json)
    }

}

Example of use:

(lldb) po dictionary.printJson()
{
  "InviteId" : 2,
  "EventId" : 13591,
  "Messages" : [
    {
      "SenderUserId" : 9514,
      "MessageText" : "test",
      "RecipientUserId" : 9470
    },
    {
      "SenderUserId" : 9514,
      "MessageText" : "test",
      "RecipientUserId" : 9470
    }
  ],
  "TargetUserId" : 9470,
  "InvitedUsers" : [
    9470
  ],
  "InvitingUserId" : 9514,
  "WillGo" : true,
  "DateCreated" : "2016-08-24 14:01:08 +00:00"
}
14

Swift 5:

extension Dictionary {
    
    /// Convert Dictionary to JSON string
    /// - Throws: exception if dictionary cannot be converted to JSON data or when data cannot be converted to UTF8 string
    /// - Returns: JSON string
    func toJson() throws -> String {
        let data = try JSONSerialization.data(withJSONObject: self)
        if let string = String(data: data, encoding: .utf8) {
            return string
        }
        throw NSError(domain: "Dictionary", code: 1, userInfo: ["message": "Data cannot be converted to .utf8 string"])
    }
}
1
  • This work well for Codable types, but be careful with String: Any, this will produce incorrect value ! Nov 28, 2021 at 22:37
11

Swift 3:

let jsonData = try? JSONSerialization.data(withJSONObject: dict, options: [])
let jsonString = String(data: jsonData!, encoding: .utf8)!
print(jsonString)
1
  • 1
    This will crash if any part is nil, very bad practice to force unwrap the results. // Anyway there's already the same information (without the crash) in other answers, please avoid posting duplicate content. Thanks.
    – Eric Aya
    Oct 2, 2017 at 8:35
6

In Swift 5.4

extension Dictionary {
    var jsonData: Data? {
        return try? JSONSerialization.data(withJSONObject: self, options: [.prettyPrinted])
    }
    
    func toJSONString() -> String? {
        if let jsonData = jsonData {
            let jsonString = String(data: jsonData, encoding: .utf8)
            return jsonString
        }
        
        return nil
    }
}

The idea of having it as a variable is because then you can reuse it like that:

extension Dictionary {
    func decode<T:Codable>() throws -> T {
        return try JSONDecoder().decode(T.self, from: jsonData ?? Data())
    }
}
2
  • This work well for Codable types, but be careful with String: Any, this will produce incorrect value ! Nov 28, 2021 at 22:39
  • @Wo_0NDeR which property or method will produce incorrect values? Feb 17 at 15:16
5

Answer for your question is below:

Swift 2.1

     do {
          if let postData : NSData = try NSJSONSerialization.dataWithJSONObject(dictDataToBeConverted, options: NSJSONWritingOptions.PrettyPrinted){

          let json = NSString(data: postData, encoding: NSUTF8StringEncoding)! as String
          print(json)}

        }
        catch {
           print(error)
        }
2

Here's an easy extension to do this:

https://gist.github.com/stevenojo/0cb8afcba721838b8dcb115b846727c3

extension Dictionary {
    func jsonString() -> NSString? {
        let jsonData = try? JSONSerialization.data(withJSONObject: self, options: [])
        guard jsonData != nil else {return nil}
        let jsonString = String(data: jsonData!, encoding: .utf8)
        guard jsonString != nil else {return nil}
        return jsonString! as NSString
    }

}
0
1

using lldb

(lldb) p JSONSerialization.data(withJSONObject: notification.request.content.userInfo, options: [])
(Data) $R16 = 375 bytes
(lldb) p String(data: $R16!, encoding: .utf8)!
(String) $R18 = "{\"aps\": \"some_text\"}"

//or
p String(data: JSONSerialization.data(withJSONObject: notification.request.content.userInfo, options: [])!, encoding: .utf8)!
(String) $R4 = "{\"aps\": \"some_text\"}"
1
 do{
        let dataDict = [ "level" :
                            [
                                ["column" : 0,"down" : 0,"left" : 0,"right" : 0,"row" : 0,"up" : 0],
                                ["column" : 1,"down" : 0,"left" : 0,"right" : 0,"row" : 0,"up" : 0],
                                ["column" : 2,"down" : 0,"left" : 0,"right" : 0,"row" : 0,"up" : 0],
                                ["column" : 0,"down" : 0,"left" : 0,"right" : 0,"row" : 1,"up" : 0],
                                ["column" : 1,"down" : 0,"left" : 0,"right" : 0,"row" : 1,"up" : 0],
                                ["column" : 2,"down" : 0,"left" : 0,"right" : 0,"row" : 1,"up" : 0]
                            ]
        ]
        var jsonData = try JSONSerialization.data(withJSONObject: dataDict, options: JSONSerialization.WritingOptions.prettyPrinted)
        let jsonStringData =  NSString(data: jsonData as Data, encoding: NSUTF8StringEncoding)! as String
        print(jsonStringData)
    }catch{
        print(error.localizedDescription)
    }
0

This works for me:

import SwiftyJSON

extension JSON {
    
    mutating func appendIfKeyValuePair(key: String, value: Any){
        if var dict = self.dictionaryObject {
            dict[key] = value
            self = JSON(dict)
        }
    }
}

Usage:

var data: JSON = []

data.appendIfKeyValuePair(key: "myKey", value: "myValue")
0

2022, swift 5

usage of extensions:

Encode:

if let json = statisticsDict.asJSONStr() {
     //your action with json
}

Decode from Dictionary:

json.decodeFromJson(type: [String:AppStat].self)
    .onSuccess{
        $0// your dictionary of type: [String:AppStat]
    }

extensions:

extension Dictionary where Key: Encodable, Value: Encodable {
    func asJSONStr() -> String? {
        let encoder = JSONEncoder()
        if let jsonData = try? encoder.encode(self) {
            if let jsonString = String(data: jsonData, encoding: .utf8) {
                return jsonString
            }
        }
        
        return nil
    }
}

public extension String {
    func decodeFromJson<T>(type: T.Type) -> Result<T, Error> where T: Decodable {
        self.asData()
            .flatMap { JSONDecoder().try(type, from: $0) }
    }

    func asData() -> Result<Data, Error> {
        if let data = self.data(using: .utf8) {
            return .success(data)
        } else {
            return .failure(WTF("can't convert string to data: \(self)"))
        }
    }
}

extension JSONDecoder {
    func `try`<T: Decodable>(_ t: T.Type, from data: Data) -> Result<T,Error> {
        do {
            return .success(try self.decode(t, from: data))
        } catch {
            return .failure(error)
        }
    }
}
-1
private func convertDictToJson(dict : NSDictionary) -> NSDictionary?
{
    var jsonDict : NSDictionary!

    do {
        let jsonData = try JSONSerialization.data(withJSONObject:dict, options:[])
        let jsonDataString = String(data: jsonData, encoding: String.Encoding.utf8)!
        print("Post Request Params : \(jsonDataString)")
        jsonDict = [ParameterKey : jsonDataString]
        return jsonDict
    } catch {
        print("JSON serialization failed:  \(error)")
        jsonDict = nil
    }
    return jsonDict
}
1
  • 1
    Several mistakes here. Why using Foundation's NSDictionary instead of Swift's Dictionary?! Also why returning a new dictionary with a String as value, instead of returning the actual JSON data? This doesn't make sense. Also the implicitly unwrapped optional returned as an optional is really not a good idea at all.
    – Eric Aya
    Dec 13, 2018 at 9:23

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