7

Help please, I have this case:

switch(MyFoo()){
    case 0: //...
        break;
    case 1: //...
        break;
    case 2: //...
        break;
    default:
        // <HERE>
        break;
}

As you can see the switch gets the value directly from a method without saving it as a variable.

Is it possible to get which value fires the default case? For example if MyFoo() returns 7, how can I get that value?

I want to avoid to save the method result as a variable, is there a way to get the switch value from inside a case? Something like this:

default:
    this.SwitchValue // <<--
    break;

Thank you for reading, ~Saba

  • 11
    "I want to avoid to save the method result as a variable" - why? – mbeckish Apr 14 '15 at 13:23
  • 2
    If you call MyFoo() again, will it return the same value? – mbeckish Apr 14 '15 at 13:24
  • 3
    "I want to avoid to save the method result as a variable" - There is no reason not to. It's on the stack anyway. – Sheldon Neilson Apr 14 '15 at 13:25
  • 1
    Your approach to me, seems like poor architecture and design. – Greg Apr 14 '15 at 13:26
  • This is a good can the language do that question, because it can't do that and so it is obviously not documented. Keep a trace about it is a job for SO. – Orace Apr 14 '15 at 13:30
10

Is there a way to get the switch value from inside a case?

The only (proper) way is actually to store the result of MyFoo() in a variable.

var fooResult = MyFoo();
switch (fooResult)
{
    case 0:
        ...
        break;
    ...
    default:
        handleOthersCase(fooResult);
        break;
}

This code is readable and understandable and have no extra cost (As @SheldonNeilson says: It's on the stack anyway).

Also, the MSDN first example about switch totally look like this. You can also find informations int the language specification.

You also can make your own switch based on a dictionary, but the only advantage I see is that you can use it for complex cases (any kind of object instead of string/int/...). Performance is a drawback.

It may look like this:

public class MySwitch<T> : Dictionary<T, Action<T>>
{
    private Action<T> _defaultAction;

    public void TryInvoke(T value)
    {
        Action<T> action;
        if (TryGetValue(value, out action))
        {
            action(value);
        }
        else
        {
            var defaultAction = _defaultAction;
            if (defaultAction != null)
            {
                defaultAction(value);
            }
        }
    }

    public void SetDefault(Action<T> defaultAction)
    {
        _defaultAction = defaultAction;
    }
}

And be used like this:

var mySwitch = new MySwitch<int>();

mySwitch.Add(1, i => Console.WriteLine("one"));                             // print "one"
mySwitch.Add(2, i => Console.WriteLine("two"));                             // print "two"
mySwitch.SetDefault(i => Console.WriteLine("With the digits: {0}", i));     // print any other value with digits.

mySwitch.TryInvoke(42);                                                     // Output: "With the digits: 42"

Or based on this response, this:

public class MySwitch2<T>
{
    private readonly T _input;

    private bool _done = false;

    private MySwitch2(T input)
    {
        _input = input;
    }

    public MySwitch2<T> On(T input)
    {
        return new MySwitch2<T>(input);
    }

    public MySwitch2<T> Case(T caseValue, Action<T> action)
    {
        if (!_done && Equals(_input, caseValue))
        {
            _done = true;
            action(_input);
        }
        return this;
    }

    public void Default(Action<T> action)
    {
        if (!_done)
        {
            action(_input);
        }
    }
}

Can be used like that:

MySwitch2<int>.On(42)
    .Case(1, i => Console.WriteLine("one"))
    .Case(2, i => Console.WriteLine("two"))
    .Default(i => Console.WriteLine("With the digits: {0}", i));
  • 1
    Wouldn't it be nicer if you could do the following so that fooResult is only visible in the scope of the switch block? switch (var fooResult = MyFoo()) { case 0: ... break; ... default: handleOthersCase(fooResult); break; } – George Birbilis Sep 1 '15 at 17:30
  • ...if you agree, please vote at visualstudio.uservoice.com/forums/121579-visual-studio/… – George Birbilis Sep 1 '15 at 18:18
  • The problem is just that a goto case statement that refers to an undeclared case and therefore will go to the default will not pass the case label value because it's not the value of the case variable. – Davide Cannizzo Jan 10 '18 at 16:25
5

I can't see a reason as well why to use it like that but may be a work around will be like this:

int x;
switch ( x = MyFoo())
{
    case 0: //...
        break;
    case 1: //...
        break;
    case 2: //...
        break;
    default:
        var s = x; // Access and play with x here
        break;
}
3

No, this isn't possible. You can assign the value to variable inside switch, if you want to look like reinventing the wheel:

        int b;
        .....
        switch (b = MyFoo())
        {
            case 1:
                break;
            case 2:
                break;
            default:
                //do smth with b
                break;
        }
1

The easiest way is to save the result of MyFoo() as a variable.. But if you don't want to do that you could do:

switch(MyFoo()){
    case 0: //...
        break;
    case 1: //...
        break;
    case 2: //...
        break;
    default:
        this.SwitchCase = MyFoo();
        break;
}

Although I would advise against this and say save the value as a variable to save your program the extra work.

Saving the value of MyFoo as a variable becomes more important the more complex the example gets as the value of MyFoo could have changed between the switch and default case

This will only work where MyFoo is a pure function. I.e. returns the same value for a given parameter

for example the following would work:

Private int MyFoo()
{
   return 3;
}

But the following would not:

private int MyFoo()
{
  Random r = new Random();
  return r.Next(5);
}
  • 1
    Who cares about extra work - the worse point is there's no reason to assume that MyFoo is a pure function. It's quite likely it has side-effects, and if not now, it's quite possible they will appear in the future. – Luaan Apr 14 '15 at 13:51
  • @Luaan although I think i noted this substantially enough in my answer, I have updated my answer to reiterate the point. – user1 Apr 14 '15 at 13:57

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