5

This is my first attempt at threads in Python... And it failed miserably :) I wanted to implement a basic critical zone problem, and found that this code actually doesn't present a problem.

The question: why don't I have problems with the counter increment? Shouldn't the counter have random values after a run? I can only explain this if the incrementing is already executed atomically, or if the threads are not concurrent...

import threading
import time

turnstile_names = ["N", "E", "S", "W"]
count = 0

class Counter(threading.Thread):
    def __init__(self, id):
        threading.Thread.__init__(self)
        self.id = id

    def run(self):
        global count
        for i in range(20):
            #self.sem.acquire()
            count = count + 1
            #self.sem.release()

def main():
    sem = threading.Semaphore(1)

    counters = [Counter(name) for name in turnstile_names]

    for counter in counters:
        counter.start()

    # We're running!

    for counter in counters:
        counter.join()

    print count
    return 0

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

Notes: I left the acquire() and release() calls commented to check the difference. I tried to pace the thread adding small sleeps after the increment - no difference

Solution/tests: Thanks Kevin (see accepted answer below). I was just testing changing the loop variable and got this:

Loops    Result
20       99% of the time 80. Sometimes 60.
200      99% of the time 800. Sometimes 600.
2000     Maybe 10% of the time different value
20000    Finally... random numbers! I've yet to see 80000 or 60000.
         All numbers are now random, as originally expected.

I suspect this seems to mean that the thread overhead is in the order of 10^4 increment operations.

Another interesting test (well, in my opinion, at least):

I added time.sleep(random.random()/divisor) after the increment and found, with the loop count again to 20:

divisor     result
100         always 4, so the race condition is always there.
1000        95% of the time 4, sometimes 3 or 5 (once 7)
10000       99% of the time NOT 4, varying from 4 to 13
100000      basically same as 10000
1000000     varying from 10 to 70
10000000... same as previous... (even with time.sleep(0))
7
  • What was the expected and actual output? – Peter Wood Apr 14 '15 at 15:26
  • Thanks for the fast reply! So, the granularity of the threads in python is at statement level? Statements are always executed atomically? – jcoppens Apr 14 '15 at 15:29
  • AFAIK, the GIL has bytecode-level granularity. And x = x+1 compiles down to about four pieces of bytecode, so I wouldn't expect it to be atomic. I can't explain why it appears otherwise here. – Kevin Apr 14 '15 at 15:30
  • Nvm, I get the race condition. – C.B. Apr 14 '15 at 15:37
  • did you try to increase the number of iteration? 20 is not that much and you may not hit an interrupt in problematic place – user3012759 Apr 14 '15 at 15:42
5

If you increase the number of iterations per-thread:

def run(self):
    global count
    for i in range(100000):
        #self.sem.acquire()
        count = count + 1
        #self.sem.release()

Then a race condition does occur. Your script prints e.g. 175165, when 400000 would be expected. This suggests that incrementing is not atomic.


Additional evidence that incrementing isn't atomic: the behavior of threads in CPython is mandated by the Global Interpreter Lock. According to the wiki,

the global interpreter lock, or GIL, is a mutex that prevents multiple native threads from executing Python bytecodes at once.

If the GIL has bytecode-level granularity, then we expect incrementing to not be atomic, because it takes more than one bytecode to execute, as demonstrated by the dis module:

>>> import dis
>>> def f():
...     x = 0
...     x = x + 1
...
>>> dis.dis(f)
  2           0 LOAD_CONST               1 (0)
              3 STORE_FAST               0 (x)

  3           6 LOAD_FAST                0 (x)
              9 LOAD_CONST               2 (1)
             12 BINARY_ADD
             13 STORE_FAST               0 (x)
             16 LOAD_CONST               0 (None)
             19 RETURN_VALUE

Here, the act of incrementing is performed by byte codes 6 through 13.


So why did the original code not exhibit the race condition? This seems to be due to the short life expectancy of each thread - by looping only 20 times, each thread would complete its work and die before the next thread started its own work.

1
  • That was it! It seems that that the actual increment just statistically got lost in the rest of the time spent in the threading process. While you were replying, I was just doing the same tests here (original question edited). – jcoppens Apr 14 '15 at 15:50
2

In Cpython, thread safety is determined by atomicity (a single bytecode is not interrupted), the GIL (python locks a single thread for about 100 "ticks") and luck. Decompiling a simpler function,

>>> import dis
>>> count = 0
>>> def x():
...     count = count + 1
... 
>>> dis.dis(x)
  2           0 LOAD_FAST                0 (count)
              3 LOAD_CONST               1 (1)
              6 BINARY_ADD          
              7 STORE_FAST               0 (count)
             10 LOAD_CONST               0 (None)
             13 RETURN_VALUE        

We see that the code can be interrupted between a load and a store. This could mean that one thread loads a value, is suspended and eventually the overwrites a larger value with its result.

Now luck comes into play. Doing the operation 20 times isn't much. Lets change your code to take the count as a parameter and see what happens with larger values

import threading
import time
import sys

turnstile_names = ["N", "E", "S", "W"]
count = 0

class Counter(threading.Thread):
    def __init__(self, id):
        threading.Thread.__init__(self)
        self.id = id

    def run(self):
        global count
        for i in range(int(sys.argv[1])):
            #self.sem.acquire()
            count = count + 1
            #self.sem.release()

def main():
    sem = threading.Semaphore(1)

    counters = [Counter(name) for name in turnstile_names]

    for counter in counters:
        counter.start()

    # We're running!

    for counter in counters:
        counter.join()

    print count
    return 0

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

One one run I got:

td@timsworld2:~/tmp/so$ python count.py 1
4
td@timsworld2:~/tmp/so$ python count.py 2
8
td@timsworld2:~/tmp/so$ python count.py 20
80
td@timsworld2:~/tmp/so$ python count.py 200
749
td@timsworld2:~/tmp/so$ python count.py 2000
4314

With 2000 in 4 threads, I've lost nearly half the values.

1
  • Looks like @Kevin did the same thing and is a faster typist to boot! – tdelaney Apr 14 '15 at 15:51

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.