17

Is there a global way to detect when audio is playing or starts playing in the browser.

something like along the idea of if(window.mediaPlaying()){...

without having the code tied to a specific element?

EDIT: What's important here is to be able to detect ANY audio no matter where the audio comes from. Whether it comes from an iframe, a video, the Web Audio API, etc.

0
10
+25

No one should use this but it works.

Basically the only way that I found to access the entire window's audio is using MediaDevices.getDisplayMedia().

From there a MediaStream can be fed into an AnyalizerNode that can be used to check the if the audio volume is greater than zero.

Only works in Chrome and maybe Edge (Only tested in Chrome 80 on Linux)

JSFiddle with <video>, <audio> and YouTube!

Important bits of code (cannot post in a working snippet because of the Feature Policies on the snippet iframe):

var audioCtx = new AudioContext();
var analyser = audioCtx.createAnalyser();

var bufferLength = analyser.fftSize;
var dataArray = new Float32Array(bufferLength);

window.isAudioPlaying = () => {
  analyser.getFloatTimeDomainData(dataArray);
  for (var i = 0; i < bufferLength; i++) {
    if (dataArray[i] != 0) return true;

  }
  return false;
}

navigator.mediaDevices.getDisplayMedia({
     video: true,
     audio: true
   })
   .then(stream => {
      if (stream.getAudioTracks().length > 0) {
        var source = audioCtx.createMediaStreamSource(stream);
        source.connect(analyser);

        document.body.classList.add('ready');
      } else {
        console.log('Failed to get stream. Audio not shared or browser not supported');
      }

   }).catch(err => console.log("Unable to open capture: ", err));
2
  • Good solution but unfortunately, this doesn't always work. I've tried it on Google Meet to detect if somebody is talking but the message says that audio is playing even when nobody speaks.
    – Aurasphere
    May 23 at 9:18
  • 1
    There seems to a little bit of static coming from the tab, even if everyone is muted. I made an updated fiddle that shows a graph of the audio. jsfiddle
    – Trobol
    May 23 at 20:51
2

Verily, I search a lot and read all MDN docs about Web Audio API but don't find any global flag on window that shows audio playing but I have a tricky way that shows ANY audio playing, no matter an iframe or video but about Web Audio API I'm not sure, the tricky way is:

const allAudio = Array.from( document.querySelectorAll('audio') );
const allVideo = Array.from( document.querySelectorAll('video') );
const isPlaying = [...allAudio, ...allVideo].some(item => !item.paused);

Now, buy the isPlaying flag we can detect playing in the browser.

1
  • 1
    Nearly positive this relies on the audio / video elements to be part of the DOM. I'm pretty sure you can create an audio element with JS & play it very easily without ever adding it to the DOM; so this wouldn't work for that scenario. Dec 13 '20 at 11:50
0

I was looking for a solution in Google, but i didn't find anything yet. Maybe you could check some data that has X value only when audio is playing. If you have some button that start playing the audio file, maybe you can be sure that the audio is playing by adding some event listener on the rep. button...

Maybe something like adding an event listener to the "audio" tag? If i remember correctly, audio tag has a "paused" attribute... And now i just remember that the audio has "paused" attribute...

Also, you may want to check this topic HTML5 check if audio is playing?

i jus find it five seconds ago jaja

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There is a playbackState property (https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/MediaSession/playbackState), but not all browsers support it.

if(navigator.mediaSession.playbackState === "playing"){...
4
  • "without having the code tied to a specific element" is a crucial aspect of the question. (At least for me.)
    – brillout
    Mar 15 '20 at 10:50
  • True, in this case the playbackState should be set for the element first (default is "none"), but it can be set for any media source.
    – NinaW
    Mar 15 '20 at 15:53
  • If you have no control over the source element, you could follow Ed's logic and look for media elements in your document (audio, video, iframe) and check if any of them are playing audio.
    – NinaW
    Mar 15 '20 at 16:13
  • I'll have to spend some time looking into this. There are some options for accessing iframe's document and its internal DOM like contentWindow (developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/HTMLIFrameElement/…) and frames (developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/Window/frames). I also found a related question at stackoverflow.com/questions/43745161/… that might be helpful.
    – NinaW
    Mar 15 '20 at 18:48

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