29

I have various controllers in my app that all require validation, and when validation fails, I want to display an alert with the errors. Is there some best practice/design pattern for doing this? I could simply create a static function in a Helper class like so:

static func displayAlert(message: String, buttonTitle: String, vc: UIViewController)
{
    let alertController = UIAlertController(title: "", message: message, preferredStyle: .Alert)

    let okAction = UIAlertAction(title: buttonTitle, style: .Default, handler: nil)
    alertController.addAction(okAction)

    vc.presentViewController(alertController, animated: true, completion: nil)
}

But then I need to pass the view controller..which seems like bad practice. I could shoot off a notification and observe it, but that seems like overkill. Am I overthinking this, or is there some more acceptable way to go about handling something like this?

  • 1
    passing in the view controller is fine here, better than implementing in a view controller and not being able to share the code. I would say you're overthinking it :) – Patrick Goley Apr 14 '15 at 18:00
  • Please check this global UIAlertController extension: stackoverflow.com/a/60414319/8201581 – Yogesh Patel Feb 26 at 12:48

10 Answers 10

57

I ended up creating an extension for UIViewController and creating the alert function there:

extension UIViewController {
  func alert(message: String, title: String = "") {
    let alertController = UIAlertController(title: title, message: message, preferredStyle: .alert)
    let OKAction = UIAlertAction(title: "OK", style: .default, handler: nil)
    alertController.addAction(OKAction)
    self.present(alertController, animated: true, completion: nil)
  }  
}
| improve this answer | |
29

Swift 4

I wanted this same functionality for myself, so I made a full extension. To use it, create a new swift file in your project and name it whatever you'd like. Place the following code inside:

import UIKit

extension UIViewController {

    func presentAlertWithTitle(title: String, message: String, options: String..., completion: @escaping (Int) -> Void) {
        let alertController = UIAlertController(title: title, message: message, preferredStyle: .alert)
        for (index, option) in options.enumerated() {
            alertController.addAction(UIAlertAction.init(title: option, style: .default, handler: { (action) in
                completion(index)
            }))
        }
        self.present(alertController, animated: true, completion: nil)
    }
}

To use it (which so many people don't actually show, which can lead to confusion for a newbie like myself):

presentAlertWithTitle(title: "Test", message: "A message", options: "1", "2") { (option) in
    print("option: \(option)")
    switch(option) {
        case 0:
            print("option one")
            break
        case 1:
            print("option two")
        default:
            break
    }
}
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12

As original answer from itstrueimryan at https://stackoverflow.com/a/30714429/6822183

Update for Swift 3:

extension UIViewController {

    func alert(message: String, title: String = "") {
        let alertController = UIAlertController(title: title, message: message, preferredStyle: .alert)
        let OKAction = UIAlertAction(title: "OK", style: .default, handler: nil)
        alertController.addAction(OKAction)
        self.present(alertController, animated: true, completion: nil)
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
5

I may have found a better answer to this problem, via an article by Krakendev: https://krakendev.io/blog/subclassing-can-suck-and-heres-why.

The idea is to use protocol-oriented programming to create a default implementation of an alert just for UIViewControllers:

protocol Alertable {
    func issueAlert()
}

extension Alertable where Self: UIViewController {
    func issueAlert() {
        // alert code here
    }
}

Now, just like that, every UIViewController that adheres to Alertable will have the issueAlert() method available to them without even having to define its own implementation.

And, of course, we can define parameters for the issueAlert function as well:

extension Alertable where Self: UIViewController {
    func issueAlert(title: "Default Title", message: String = "Default Message") {
        // alert code here
    }
}

So our view controller can do either:

issueAlert()

or

issueAlert(title: "Error", message: "Something went wrong")

Two advantages to this approach that I can think of are that you know if a view controller has access to this method just by looking at the Alertable protocol in the class definition, and individual view controllers can override this method if they want to provide custom functionality. Of course, now you can also specify the Alertable contract as a method parameter.

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  • 2
    I know it is a bit late but NO. This is most likely the worst approach and the article you posted is complete no-no for large applications/systems. In this case you expect developer will now search for all view controller classes and append Alertable to them and expect other developers to do the same which is completely unacceptable. The next issue is that once you will implement custom dialogs you will need to check for top controller for instance navigationController ?? self which now destroys your protocol usage. The easiest is to create UIViewController extension, best is what OP did. – Matic Oblak Feb 12 '18 at 10:18
  • I am the OP, was just speculating on other solutions. But ty for the thoughts on this. Can you elaborate on the second point (navigationController)? Thanks. – Ryan Bobrowski Feb 13 '18 at 17:15
  • The navigation controller part becomes a problem when/if you find out your best solution for using custom dialogs is using them as views and adding them as views (using child view controller seems to work best). In my case I would call viewController.attachDialog("message") which displays the dialog in given view controller and is great (works for split screen as well since it is not presented). But then if I do this in navigation controller the bar will not be overlaid. So I need to call viewController.navigationController?.attachDialog("message") which now destroys the general tool... – Matic Oblak Feb 13 '18 at 17:24
  • So to use it as you did I need to do 2 things: First I need to make my navigation controller (every navigation controller) correspond to Alertable which I now need a GOD class for (or at least I see no better way) so I need class MyNavigationController: UIViewController, Alertable. And even then I would need to call what? (navigationController as? Alertable ?? self).attachDialog("message")? It makes zero sense. IF anything, an extension on UIViewController would do but it is even better calling Alert.showIn(navigationController ?? self, message: "message"). – Matic Oblak Feb 13 '18 at 17:28
2

Answer from Sigex is completely fine, except the int indices passing to trace the button clicks might not make sense because, caller needed to keep track with int value. In that case passing string arguments and comparing them in switch case in completion block makes more sense to me. I would rather use like,

import UIKit

extension UIViewController {

    func presentAlertWithTitle(title: String, message: String, options: String..., completion: @escaping (String) -> Void) {
        let alertController = UIAlertController(title: title, message: message, preferredStyle: .alert)
        for (index, option) in options.enumerated() {
            alertController.addAction(UIAlertAction.init(title: option, style: .default, handler: { (action) in
                completion(options[index])
            }))
        }
        self.present(alertController, animated: true, completion: nil)
    }
}

And test with,

class TestViewController: UIViewController {

    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()

        presentAlertWithTitle(title: "Test", message: "A sample message", options: "start", "stop", "cancel") { (option) in
            print("option: \(option)")
            switch(option) {
                case "start":
                    print("start button pressed")
                    break
                case "stop":
                    print("stop button pressed")
                    break
                case "cancel":
                    print("cancel button pressed")
                    break
                default:
                    break
            }
        }
    }
}
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1

Why not create a Utility function that returns the AlertView to the ViewController?

self.presentViewController(Utilities.createAlertController("errorMessage"), animated: true, completion: nil);
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  • 1
    I just don't like to clutter up my Utils file when it makes sense to use an extension. Maybe it doesn't make 100% sense in this case but I like the fact that all I have to do is type alert("message") from any viewcontroller with my answer. – Ryan Bobrowski Jun 8 '15 at 20:08
  • 1
    Fair enough...I guess it is kind of convenient – MobileMon Jun 8 '15 at 20:10
1

Updated for swift 3:

if you want to show the alert message to user used below simple lines of code;

// function defination:

func showMessageToUser(title: String, msg: String)  {
    let alert = UIAlertController(title: title, message: msg, preferredStyle: UIAlertControllerStyle.alert)
    alert.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: "Ok", style: UIAlertActionStyle.default, handler: nil))
    self.present(alert, animated: true, completion: nil)
}

//function call :

self.showMessageToUser(title: "Alert", msg: "your message to user")

// Enjoy coding..!

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1

I used Sigex's extension in my code, however I have added a check, if options were used or not.

If no options are given in the call, then the Alert only shows "OK" and completes with returning option 0.

extension UIViewController {

    func presentAlertWithTitle(title: String, message: String, options: String..., completion: @escaping (Int) -> Void) {

        let alertController = UIAlertController(title: title, message: message, preferredStyle: .alert)
        if options.count == 0 {
            let OKAction = UIAlertAction(title: "OK", style: .default, handler: { (action) in
                 completion(0)
            })
            alertController.addAction(OKAction)
        } else {

            for (index, option) in options.enumerated() {
                 alertController.addAction(UIAlertAction.init(title: option, style: .default, handler: { (action) in
                    completion(index)
                }))
            }
        }
        self.present(alertController, animated: true, completion: nil)
    }

}

Just omit the part , options: "1","2" then default alert is shown.

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0

I love Sigex's extension, but I spiced it up a bit to add style on button depending on the title

func presentAlertWithOptions(title: String, message: String, options: String..., completion: @escaping (Int) -> Void) {
    let alertController = UIAlertController(title: title, message: message, preferredStyle: .alert)
    if options.count == 0 { //if there is no options, show a basic alert
        let OKAction = UIAlertAction(title: "OK", style: .default, handler: { (action) in
             completion(0)
        })
        alertController.addAction(OKAction)
    } else { //alert with options
        for (index, option) in options.enumerated() {
            var alertStyle = UIAlertAction.Style.default
            switch option { //check if we should style the buttons
            case "Cancel": //cancel style
                alertStyle = .cancel
            case "Logout", "Discard Changes", "Discard", "Delete", "Remove": //destructive style
                alertStyle = .destructive
            default: break //keep as default
            }
            alertController.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: option, style: alertStyle, handler: { (action) in
                completion(index)
            }))
        }
    }
    self.present(alertController, animated: true, completion: nil)
}
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0

Swift 4.1

    let alert = UIAlertController(title: "Atenção",message: "Mensagem Aqui",preferredStyle: .alert)

    alert.addAction(UIAlertAction(title: "Ok", style: .default, handler: nil))
    self.present(alert, animated: true)
| improve this answer | |

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