-5

Since duplicate key overrides the previous key and its corresponding value in hashmap. But if i call get() method and provide previous key as an argument, it returns the overriden value. How it is possible since that key is overriden by new key so it should throw an exception.

//This class is used as a key
Class MapKey
{
  public boolean equlas( Object o)
  {
    return true;
  }
}

//This is test class
class MapTest
{
  public static void main(String a[])
  {
    Map m=new Hashmap<Mapkey, String>();
    MapKey mk1=new MapKey();
    m.put(mk1,"one");

    MapKey mk2=new MapKey();
    m.put(mk2,"two");

    MapKey mk3=new MapKey();
    m.put(mk3,"three");

    System.out.println(m.get(mk1));
    System.out.println(m.get(mk2));
  }
}

output: three three

Since keys are equal so it should get overriden by last key object mk3. so how is it possible to retrieve value with first or second key object?

Thanks in advance

  • 2
    You should implementhashCode for any classes you intend to use in a HashMap. – GriffeyDog Apr 14 '15 at 18:54
  • and there is a typo in equlas, is not override and is not comparing anything, just returning true.. – Garis M Suero Apr 14 '15 at 18:56
  • Please give us code that actually compiles. Class, equlas, and Hashmap are incorrect, for instance. – GriffeyDog Apr 14 '15 at 18:58
  • 1
    Also note that HashMap.get does not throw an exception if the key isn't present. It returns null. – Paul Boddington Apr 14 '15 at 19:00
  • I'm voting to close as I can't reproduce this. I tried your code with typos corrected and I didn't get the results you report. – Paul Boddington Apr 14 '15 at 19:11
2

This is because you have not overrided hashcode method. In equals method you have declared all the objects are equal. But due to default hashcode implementation all equal objects are returning different hashcodes. As hashcodes are used to save values in a hashmap, you are able to get values for old keys mk1 and mk2.

1

The equals method isn't the most important for HashMap. As the name suggests, the most important method for inserting values into the HashMap is hashCode, not equals. A value is only overwriten in HashMap, if a key k in the map fullfills the following condition: k.hashCode() is equal to the hashCode of the key for inserting an item and the key equals k.

1

The code you post doesn't come up with

three 
three 

even if I fix it to clean up the compile errors:

import java.util.*;

class MapKey
{
  public boolean equlas( Object o)
  {
    return true;
  }
}

class MapTest
{
  public static void main(String a[])
  {
    Map<MapKey, String> m=new HashMap<MapKey, String>();
    MapKey mk1=new MapKey();
    m.put(mk1,"one");

    MapKey mk2=new MapKey();
    m.put(mk2,"two");

    MapKey mk3=new MapKey();
    m.put(mk3,"three");

    System.out.println(m.get(mk1));
    System.out.println(m.get(mk2));
  }
}

This prints

one
two

Even if I fix the MapKey to override equals:

class MapKey
{
  public boolean equlas( Object o)
  {
    return true;
  }

  public boolean equals( Object o)
  {
    return true;
  }
}

this prints the same output.

If I implement hashCode:

class MapKey
{
  public int hashCode()
  {
    return 1;
  }

  public boolean equals( Object o)
  {
    return true;
  }
}

then it will print out

three
three

The default implementations of hashCode and equals are based on the object reference, references to different objects will not be equal. Maps use hashCode to decide which bucket to store an object in, and use equals to differentiate between different objects in the same bucket.

Here you made three different instances so their hashCodes will be different (as long as there isn't a collision, in which case the equals method will get called to decide if the two objects are the same). In this case there isn't a collision, and it's not until hashCode gets overridden that the different mapKey instances are treated as equivalent.

  • first of all very sorry for typing mistakes... – Nikhil Kakade Apr 15 '15 at 4:57
  • first of all very sorry for typing mistakes...You made the code correct, that's what I intended to ask. My question is, if we override hashCode() and equals() methods as you did, then as the implementation of hashMap suggests that, when we insert the new key which is duplicate of the previous one then the previous key gets overriden by the new one. So if it gets overriden in the above case, then how it is possible to retrieve value from map by using the previous key(by using first or second reference of MapKey class in above example). – Nikhil Kakade Apr 15 '15 at 5:05
  • I intentionally overrided equals and hashCode method to give same value each time. because I wanted to check the behaviour of hashMap in case of duplicate key insertion. As document suggests, the previous key-value pair gets replaced in case of duplicate key insertion. If it is correct, then after inserting three same keys in above example, how is it possible to get value by using first key(mk1 or mk2) since it is no longer present in hashMap now. It gets replaced by third key i.e. mk3. – Nikhil Kakade Apr 15 '15 at 16:40
  • if the different keys return the same result from the equals and hashCode then the key objects are equivalent, there's no way you can get a different value. your posted code didn't show this behavior because Object@hashCode was giving different results for the different objects. also note you have to be careful to avoid posting coding mistakes because it's difficult for answerers to know what's an essential problem vs. some extraneous typo introduced when posting. you can edit the question and fix the typos. – Nathan Hughes Apr 15 '15 at 16:50

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