3

This is a bit unclear to me... So, if I have a function:

char *test(int ran){
    char *ret = new char[ran];
    // process...
    return ret;
}

and then call it multiple times:

for(int i = 0; i < 100000000; i++){
   char *str = test(rand()%10000000+10000000);
   // process...

   // delete[] str; // do i have to delete it here?
}

So the question is, do I have to use delete[] for each new[] call?

1
  • This seems to be a common C++ issue. Generally, you'll want to call new and delete in the same class, if you're using one. Otherwise I'm interested to see what people say.
    – Xavier Ho
    Jun 3, 2010 at 12:38

3 Answers 3

5

You don't have to. But if you don't delete memory you reserved with 'new' you will start running out of memory eventually (memory leak).

1
  • Ah, yeah, that makes sense since my program seems to use more and more memory each time :D
    – Newbie
    Jun 3, 2010 at 12:44
5

Yes you do, otherwise you'll have a memory leak.

It's not the greatest idea to allocate in one function and free in another, though. Why not allocate in the for loop and pass the pointer to test -- this keeps the new and delete together in the code.

9
  • 3
    It's perfectly ok to do it, and quite common.
    – anon
    Jun 3, 2010 at 12:39
  • crap. this'll take a while to fix :D
    – Newbie
    Jun 3, 2010 at 12:43
  • @Newbie: I hope you are not actually such big memory allocations in your real code. It will surely throw a std::bad_alloc exception indicating memory allocation failure otherwise.
    – Naveen
    Jun 3, 2010 at 12:46
  • Nope, that was just example, is there some certain limit on new[] memory allocation size...? in my example it made max 20megs...
    – Newbie
    Jun 3, 2010 at 12:52
  • 3
    @Neil many things are perfectly OK, but still aren't a good idea. :) Jun 3, 2010 at 12:57
3

The answer was already given, but as you tagged the question as C++, and not as C, this is how you probably want to do it in C++ (of course, there might be other reasons not to, but there is little chance).

vector<char> (int ran){
    vector<char> ret(char);
    // process...
    return ret;
}

And to call it:

for(int i = 0; i < 100000000; i++){
   vector<char> str = test(rand()%10000000+10000000);
   // process...
}

No new, thus no delete thus no memory leak.

Actually, you also probably want to use std::string instead of char* (I used vector to give a more general example).

Don't worry of data that will be copied. The compiler will optimize it out. Edit : ok, it might not optimize it out :) however there are big chances it will. And as long there is no performance issues, go for the simplest version.

1
  • Well, it's not much more a lie than saying "it will copy the vector and result in a performance loss". But I edited it still :) Jun 3, 2010 at 12:59

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