1

I intend to manipulate a vector using threads inside a class.cpp source code not the main.cpp source code via a class member function.

my main.cpp is:

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <vector>
#include "class.h"

using namespace std;
int main()
{
    CLASS* classObject = new CLASS();
    classObject->classMemberFucntion(... some arguments....);
    return 0;
}

class.h is:

#include <vector>

#ifndef SLIC_H
#define SLIC_H

class CLASS
{
    protected:
    std::vector<int> cluster;

    public:

    void classMemberFunction(... some arguemnts ... );

    //creating threads function
    void thread2(std::vector<int> *cluster);
    void thread3(std::vector<int> *cluster);
    void thread4(std::vector<int> *cluster);
};
#endif

and the class.cpp is:

#include "class.h"
#include <vector>
#include <thread>
using namespace std;

void CLASS::classMemberFunction(... some arguments ...)
{
    thread t2(&CLASS::thread2, CLASS(), &cluster);
    t2.join();
    thread t3(&CLASS::thread3, CLASS(), &cluster);
    t3.join();
    thread t4(&CLASS::thread4, CLASS(), &cluster);
    t4.join();

    //main thread===================================================
    for (unsigned n = 0; n < 1000/4; ++n)
            {
                cluster.push_back(-1);
            }
    cout << cluster.size() << endl;
}

void CLASS::thread2(std::vector<int> *cluster)
{
    for (unsigned n = 0; n < 1000 / 4; ++n)
    {
        (*cluster).push_back(-1);
    }
}

void CLASS::thread3(std::vector<int> *cluster)
{
    for (unsigned n = 0; n < 1000 / 4; ++n)
    {
        (*cluster).push_back(-1);
    }
}

void CLASS::thread4(std::vector<int> *cluster)
{
    for (unsigned n = 0; n < 1000 / 4; ++n)
    {
        (*cluster).push_back(-1);
    }
}

as it is seen, I intend to start three threads inside a member function (the member function acting as a main thread and having a total of four threads) and initialize a vector. I expect the program to print a size of 1000 when calling cout << cluster.size() << endl; but every time the program prints a size of 250 ! I'm new to threading and I have no idea if I'm using the right syntax. So let me know what I'm doing wrong.

UPDATE:
so I revised my code like this:

//main.cpp
#include "stdafx.h"
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <vector>
#include "class.h"

using namespace std;
int main()
{
    myCLASS* classObject = new myCLASS();
    classObject->classMemberFunction();
    return 0;
}

and:

//class.h
#include "stdafx.h"
#include <vector>
#include <mutex>

#ifndef SLIC_H
#define SLIC_H

class myCLASS
{
protected:
    std::vector<int> cluster;
    std::mutex cluster_mutex;

public:

    void classMemberFunction();
    //creating threads function
    void thread2();
    void thread3();
    void thread4();
};
#endif

and:

//class.cpp
#include "stdafx.h"
#include "class.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <thread>
#include <mutex>
using namespace std;

void myCLASS::classMemberFunction(void)
{
    thread t2(&myCLASS::thread2, *this);
    thread t3(&myCLASS::thread3, *this);
    thread t4(&myCLASS::thread4, *this);

    //main thread===================================================
    for (int n = 0; n < 1000 / 4; ++n)
    {
        cluster.push_back(-1);
    }
    t2.join();
    t3.join();
    t4.join();
    cout << cluster.size() << endl;
}

void myCLASS::thread2()
{
    cluster_mutex.lock();
    for (int n = 0; n < 1000 / 4; ++n)
    {
        cluster.push_back(-1);
    }
    cluster_mutex.unlock();
}

void myCLASS::thread3()
{
    cluster_mutex.lock();
    for (int n = 0; n < 1000 / 4; ++n)
    {
        cluster.push_back(-1);
    }
    cluster_mutex.unlock();
}

void myCLASS::thread4()
{
    cluster_mutex.lock();
    for (int n = 0; n < 1000 / 4; ++n)
    {
        cluster.push_back(-1);
    }
    cluster_mutex.unlock();
}

when I run the code in Visual Studio 2013, I get the following:

1>------ Build started: Project: threadTEST, Configuration: Release Win32 ------
1>  class.cpp
1>D:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 12.0\VC\include\xlocnum(155): error C2280: 'std::mutex::mutex(const std::mutex &)' : attempting to reference a deleted function
1>          D:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 12.0\VC\include\mutex(113) : see declaration of 'std::mutex::mutex'
1>          This diagnostic occurred in the compiler generated function 'myCLASS::myCLASS(const myCLASS &)'
1>  threadTEST.cpp
========== Build: 0 succeeded, 1 failed, 0 up-to-date, 0 skipped ==========

I think there is something wrong with the default copy constructor !

7
  • That is not the issue in this code because a thread is joined before the next one is constructed. So this runs nicely sequentially. Without the t2.join() you are right and this code would crash & burn ....
    – emvee
    Commented Apr 15, 2015 at 20:31
  • @haavee ahh yes indeed, I must have glossed over that. Might be good to make a mention to him about it though, since he's probably done this by accident and actually in effect is not really doing any true parallelism at all.
    – user562566
    Commented Apr 15, 2015 at 20:32
  • yes please tell me how to make it run parallel ! Commented Apr 15, 2015 at 20:36
  • 1
    @AmirHosseinF, haavee is explaining in his answer. You're going to incur overhead in locking access to the container. If it were me, I'd call resize() on the vector to ensure I can legally access it using the subscript operator [] and then use an INT associated with the thread as an index for where to start writing so you can have your program run lock-free. Then you're really going to see a performance boost.
    – user562566
    Commented Apr 15, 2015 at 20:40
  • @TechnikEmpire Is that really thread-safe, though? The C++ standard doesn't guarantee that the non-const version of operator[] won't modify something that we don't realize is there. It'd be stupid, but it's possible. Commented Apr 15, 2015 at 20:46

3 Answers 3

4

When you start the thread like this:

thread t2(&CLASS::thread2, CLASS(), &cluster);

you pass a reference to a newly constructed CLASS object (CLASS()), with it's own member cluster. So the threads will push back on a temporary object.

Only the final - your main thread as it's called, is operating on the cluster member of the instance on which the member function is called.

Probably you want to create the thread like this:

thread t2(&CLASS::thread2, *this, &cluster);

because then it refers to the cluster member of the this object.

NOTE Your code is inherently very thread unsafe. The only reason your code currently works is because of the .join() you do before creating the next thread, effectively serializing your code.

As soon as those threads will run in parallel, your code will explode. Segfault, hang, crash & burn. The shared vector<int>, that all threads intend to modify, needs to be protected by a mutex.

In which case you effectively serialize access to the shared variable, rendering the use of threads, in this case, useless and complicates the code to no end.

EDIT

class CLASS
{
    protected:
    std::vector<int> cluster;
    std::mutex       mtx;   // <-- add this
...
};

Then start the threads like so:

thread t2(&CLASS::thread2, *this);

And change the threadN member functions to:

void CLASS::thread2( void ) {
     mtx.lock();
     // ... do things with `cluster`
     mtx.unlock();
}
8
  • You should probably also mention that the container he's writing on is not safe in a threaded context.
    – user562566
    Commented Apr 15, 2015 at 20:31
  • I would appreciate if you could help make this code run in parallel :) Commented Apr 15, 2015 at 20:40
  • @haavee Thanks for the help. so there is no tN.join() needed ? does it ensure all threads complete before the main thread and before the line cout << cluster.size() << endl; in the main thread ? Commented Apr 15, 2015 at 20:55
  • you should do the .join() before the cout << cluster.size() << endl; line indeed - you want to wait for all threads to finish before displaying the total size. Also I imagine that this will be slower than just for(unsigned i=0; i<1000; i++) //do stuff
    – emvee
    Commented Apr 15, 2015 at 20:56
  • @haavee I belive so.It is a foundation of a bigger project for which I hope the concurrency work ! Thank you for so much help man. I learned a lot and I'm revising my code based on your remarks ... Commented Apr 15, 2015 at 21:06
2

Ok, here are some things:

  1. I noticed this:

    for (unsigned n = 0; n < 1000/4; ++n)
    

    You shouldn't use unsigned unless you're sure it's necessary. Otherwise, just use a normal int.

  2. This:

    (*cluster).push_back(-1);
    

    is the same thing as:

    cluster->push_back(-1);
    
  3. You're using C++11, so you might as well use a unique_ptr to hold CLASS:

    std::unique_ptr<CLASS> classObject = new CLASS();
    
  4. All-caps class names are generally discouraged; that convention is primarily used with macros.

  5. You are appending to cluster from multiple different threads and therefore may cause a data race. You should manage access to the vector from the threads via a mutex:

    // in your header file
    std::vector<int> cluster;
    std::mutex cluster_mutex;
    
    // in your thread* functions
    cluster_mutex.lock();
    cluster->push_back(-1);
    cluster_mutex.unlock();
    
  6. Why are you doing this:

    thread t2(&CLASS::thread2, CLASS(), &cluster);
    t2.join();
    

    There are a few problems here:

    1. You're giving the thread function a copy of the current class.
    2. You're passing it a member...that...could normally be accessed more simply...
    3. You're joining the thread right after it's created. joining waits for the thread to complete. This kind of kills the whole point of threading: concurrency.

    Here's a better version:

    thread t2(&CLASS::thread2, *this);
    

    Remove the std::vector<int>* argument from your thread* functions and remove the explicit dereferencing of cluster:

     cluster.push_back(-1);
    
  7. Define an explicit constructor and copy constructor:

    myCLASS() {}
    myCLASS(myCLASS& rhs): cluster(rhs.cluster) {}
    

Also, when I said "try not to use all-caps," I meant something more like renaming CLASS to maybe Class or class, not myCLASS. Still looks really weird. Of course, at this point its more of a personal taste...but still.

6
  • so there should be no t*.join() whatsoever ? does it ensure all threads complete before the main thread ? Commented Apr 15, 2015 at 20:49
  • @AmirHosseinF join is a function that forces the caller (in this case, the main thread) to wait for the other thread to finish. Calling t2.join() will wait for t2 to finish, t3.join() will wait for t3, etc. This defeats the parallelism. Commented Apr 15, 2015 at 20:56
  • In this case I should add t2.join(); t3.join(); t4.join(); before the line cout << cluster.size() << endl; for the code to ensure all the threads are finished before printing the size. this way I have not damaged any parallelism ... right ? Commented Apr 15, 2015 at 20:58
  • @AmirHosseinF Exactly! You're getting it! See this link for a good tutorial on threads. Commented Apr 15, 2015 at 21:03
  • 1
    @AmirHosseinF See my last point that I just put. Also, please don't put your new code as an answer. Edit your original question instead. Commented Apr 16, 2015 at 15:05
1

Just to compliment the other great answers, I decided to put together a quick example of writing to a vector from multiple threads without a locking mechanism. Uses C++11 features, which is okay because you are too. :)

//============================================================================
// Name        : HelloThreadedVector.cpp
// Author      : Jesse Nicholson
//============================================================================

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <thread>
#include <vector>

void fillThreaded(std::vector<std::string>& vec, int startIndex, int count)
{
    int threadNumber = 0;

    if (startIndex == 0)
    {
        threadNumber = 0;
    }
    else
    {
        threadNumber = startIndex / count;
    }

    for (int i = startIndex; i < startIndex + count; ++i)
    {
        vec[i] = std::move(std::string("Filled by thread: " + std::to_string(threadNumber)));
    }
}

int main()
{

    // Get the total number of logical cores supported by the machine
    size_t totalLogicalCores = std::thread::hardware_concurrency();

    //Create the vector we're going to fill
    std::vector<std::string> stringsFromThreads;

    //Call resize to ensure we can access the vector at indices 0-999 using subscript operator []
    stringsFromThreads.resize(1000);

    size_t i = 0;

    //Get how many writes each thread will have to perform for all total threads to fill the vector
    size_t totalWritesPerThread = stringsFromThreads.size() / totalLogicalCores;

    //Create a vector of thread objects so we can easily store all the thread we're making
    std::vector<std::thread> runningThreads;

    //Because I abuse std::move(). Not really necessary, could have just pushed_back
    runningThreads.resize(totalLogicalCores);

    //Spawn each thread, pass the vector by reference, pass the start index and the total count of writes the thread is to perform
    for (i = 0; i < totalLogicalCores; ++i)
    {
        runningThreads[i] = std::move(std::thread(&fillThreaded, std::ref(stringsFromThreads), totalWritesPerThread * i, totalWritesPerThread));
    }

    //Join all of our threads
    for(i = 0; i < totalLogicalCores; ++i)
    {
        runningThreads[i].join();
    }

    runningThreads.clear();

    //Viola!
    for (auto s : stringsFromThreads)
    {
        std::cout << s << std::endl;
    }

    return 0;
}
3
  • awesome, gonna review this :) Commented Apr 15, 2015 at 21:26
  • @AmirHosseinF Don't forget to upvote and downvote questions that find helpful or unhelpful. Also don't forget to mark one of the other answers as the correct/best answer for you when you're done. Welcome to StackOverflow. :)
    – user562566
    Commented Apr 15, 2015 at 21:35
  • As a side note, my code is heavily relying on the number of cores in the machine and the number of elements in the vector being even numbers. Without that, we'd end up with a screwy program here because we'd get non-whole numbers when doing things like dividing and multiplying to get the count, position etc within the array. But you get the general idea.
    – user562566
    Commented Apr 15, 2015 at 21:54

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