3

I am currently working with a Serial Port, and the API I use will some times hang on a read, even when its own time out is set.

This is not a big problem, but i need to do some work when that happens and the hanging thread needs to be shutdown. I have tried that with the following, but it has been giving me problems as the API call is not terminated, but allowed to continue while the rest of the code continues, and the TimeoutException was thrown. How can i use Tasks to be able to cancel a hanging task after a certain amount of time?

CancellationToken token = new CancellationToken();
var task = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => 
           {
               CallingAPIThatMightHang(); // Example
           }, token);

if (!task.Wait(this.TimeToTimeOut, token))
{
    throw new TimeoutException("The operation timed out");
}
3

CancellationToken is of the form of cooperative cancellation. You need to moderate the token while executing your operation and watch if a cancelation has been requested.

From your code block, it seems as you have one long running synchronous operation which you offload to a threadpool thread. If that's the case, see if you can separate that serial call to chunks, where you can poll the token after read chunk. If you can't, cancellation wont be possible.

Note that in order to request cancellation, you'll have to create a CancellationTokenSource, which you'll later be able to call it's Cancel() method.

As a side note, serial port is async IO, You can use naturally async API's instead of offloading a synchronous to a threadpool thread.

Edit:

@HansPassant gave a better idea. Run the third party call inside another process, one which you keep a reference to. Once you need to terminate it, kill the process.

For example:

void Main()
{
    SomeMethodThatDoesStuff();
}

void SomeMethodThatDoesStuff()
{
   // Do actual stuff
}

And then launch it in a separate process:

private Process processThatDoesStuff;

void Main()
{
    processThatDoesStuff = Process.Start(@"SomeLocation");
    // Do your checks here.

    if (someCondition == null)
    {
        processThatDoesStuff.Kill();
    }
}

If you need to communicate any result between these two processes, you can do those via several mechanisms. One would be writing and reading the Standard Output of the process.

-1

I am sadly not able to use any other framework, and i am not able to just change the API i am calling so it can use a Cancellation Token.

This is how i chose to solve the problem.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        try
        {
            var result = TestThreadTimeOut();
            Console.WriteLine("Result: " + result);
        }
        catch (TimeoutException exp)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Time out");
        }
        catch (Exception exp)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Other error! " + exp.Message);
        }

        Console.WriteLine("Done!");
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    public static string TestThreadTimeOut()
    {
        string result = null;
        Thread t = new Thread(() =>
        {
            while (true)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Blah Blah Blah");
            }
        });
        t.Start();
        DateTime end = DateTime.Now + new TimeSpan(0, 0, 0, 0, 1500);
        while (DateTime.Now <= end)
        {
            if (result != null)
            {
                break;
            }
            Thread.Sleep(50);
        }
        if (result == null)
        {
            try
            {
                t.Abort();
            }
            catch (ThreadAbortException)
            {
                // Fine
            }
            throw new TimeoutException();
        }
        return result;
    }
}
  • See my edit. Perhaps that's a better idea than using Thread.Abort – Yuval Itzchakov Apr 18 '15 at 16:13
  • 1
    Thread.Abort() is a sledgehammer and can leave your program in a corrupted state. I really really recommend not using it. – Scott Chamberlain Apr 18 '15 at 16:38
  • What would you like me to use instead? – Androme Apr 18 '15 at 16:39
  • @ScottChamberlain I totally second that. Also the while with a Thread.Sleep strikes my eyes ... The usage of a Timer would be much nicer, as there would not be any spinning ... – Andreas Niedermair Apr 18 '15 at 17:02
  • 2
    @DoomStone Yuval Itzchakov's edited answer is the correct way to do it. You create a 2nd process and do it inside there. If you need to communicate between the two processes use some form of IPC, I find WCF over Named Pipes works really well and is easy to use for same machine IPC. – Scott Chamberlain Apr 18 '15 at 17:10

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