2

I'm fairly new to android programming and recently achieved a successful HTTP Post request, only to learn that my cookies are not being stored between subsequent Post/Get requests. I looked around the interweb, and found a few examples for Android's Apache client and Java's HttpURLConnection. I was unsuccessful in implementing either method into my current class, so I was wondering if someone with more experience could review my code and offer suggestions.

Recap:

  1. My initial POST request is successful and authenticated.
  2. My second POST request does not retain the cookies from the initial POST request.
  3. Is there any specific instance or reason why someone might opt for the Apache method or the Java implementation? Are both equals in their own right or does one offer more capabilities and flexibility than the other?

Any help is appreciated, thank you.

webCreate.java

import android.util.Log;

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.DataOutputStream;
import java.io.InputStreamReader;
import java.net.CookieHandler;
import java.net.CookieManager;
import java.net.HttpCookie;
import java.net.HttpURLConnection;
import java.net.URL;

import javax.net.ssl.HttpsURLConnection;

public class webCreate {

    private final String USER_AGENT = "Mozilla/5.0";


    // HTTP GET request
    public void sendGet(String url) throws Exception {

        CookieManager cookieManager = new CookieManager();
        CookieHandler.setDefault(cookieManager);
        HttpCookie cookie = new HttpCookie("lang", "en");


        URL obj = new URL(url);
        HttpURLConnection con = (HttpURLConnection) obj.openConnection();

        // optional default is GET
        con.setRequestMethod("GET");

        //add request header
        con.setRequestProperty("User-Agent", USER_AGENT);

        int responseCode = con.getResponseCode();
        Log.d("sendGet", "\nSending 'GET' request to URL : " + url);


        BufferedReader in = new BufferedReader(
                new InputStreamReader(con.getInputStream()));
        String inputLine;
        StringBuffer response = new StringBuffer();


        while ((inputLine = in.readLine()) != null) {
            response.append(inputLine);
        }

        in.close();

        //print result
        System.out.println(response.toString());
        Log.d("Response Code", response.toString());
    }

    // HTTP POST request
    String  sendPost(String url, String urlParams) throws Exception {

        CookieManager cookieManager = new CookieManager();
        CookieHandler.setDefault(cookieManager);
        HttpCookie cookie = new HttpCookie("lang", "en");

        URL obj = new URL(url);
        HttpsURLConnection con = (HttpsURLConnection) obj.openConnection();

        //add request header
        con.setRequestMethod("POST");
        con.setRequestProperty("User-Agent", USER_AGENT);
        con.setRequestProperty("Accept-Language", "en-US,en;q=0.5");

        // Send post request
        con.setDoOutput(true);
        DataOutputStream wr = new DataOutputStream(con.getOutputStream());
        wr.writeBytes(urlParams);
        wr.flush();
        wr.close();

        int responseCode = con.getResponseCode();
        System.out.println("\nSending 'POST' request to URL : " + url);
        System.out.println("Post parameters : " + urlParams);
        System.out.println("Response Code : " + responseCode);

        BufferedReader in = new BufferedReader(
                new InputStreamReader(con.getInputStream()));
        String inputLine;
        StringBuffer response = new StringBuffer();

        while ((inputLine = in.readLine()) != null) {
            response.append(inputLine);
        }
        in.close();

        System.out.println("Response Code : " + response);
        return  response.toString();
    }

}

1 Answer 1

6

You need to maintain your cookie context external to each call and provide the same cookie store it on subsequent GETs and POSTs. This is the same for both the Java implementation and Apache's implementation.

In my experience, Apache's HTTP components is better than the built in Java implementation. I spent a large amount of time trying to write a utility using Java's implementation, my largest problem was timeouts. Bad web servers would hang causing the connection to hang indefinitely. After switching to Apache the timeouts were tuneable and we didn't have any more hung threads.


I'll give an example using Apache.

Create the CookieStore instance in your parent method:

CookieStore cookieStore = new BasicCookieStore();

Then in your GET or POST implementations pass in the CookieStore instance and use it when you build the HttpClient:

public void sendGet(String url, CookieStore cookieStore) throws Exception {
    ...
    HttpClient client = HttpClientBuilder.create().setDefaultCookieStore(cookieStore).build();

    HttpGet request = new HttpGet(uri);  // or HttpPost...
    request.addHeader("User-Agent", USER_AGENT);
    HttpResponse response = client.execute(request);

    BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(response.getEntity().getContent()));
    ...
}

Android has extended java.net.HttpURLConnection and recommends using this, so I'll also give an outline for that as well.

HttpURLConnection and HttpsURLConnection automatically and transparently uses the CookieManager set in CookieHandler. CookieHandler is VM-wide so must be setup only once. If you create a new CookieManager for each request, as you did in your code, it will wipe out any cookies set in previous requests.

You do not need to create an instance of HttpCookie yourself. When HttpURLConnection receives a cookie from the server the CookieManager will receive the cookie and store it. Future requests to the same server will automatically send the previously set cookies.

So, move this code to your application setup so it happens only once:

CookieManager cookieManager = new CookieManager();
CookieHandler.setDefault(cookieManager);
9
  • Thank you for your reply, I have not had a chance to test the code. I did review your feedback and it raised another question that you may or may not be able to address. Using your example and assuming sendGet is also the name of your class: sendGet webReq = new sendGet(); webReq.sendGet("www.google.com", cookieStore); If I were to send a second webReq.sendGet why are the cookies having to be sent a second time if there was only 1 new instance of the sendGet Class? I hope this question makes sense. Formatting was a little hard in this text box.
    – snapplex
    Apr 16, 2015 at 13:13
  • sendGet is the name of the method, not the name of the class. You could store the reference to the CookieStore in your class if you prefer. However, no matter what, every time you create a new HttpClient instance you must provide the same CookieStore instance you used in previous requests to the same site.
    – MCToon
    Apr 16, 2015 at 18:02
  • Oh okay. I was hopeful your example would work, but Android studio refuses to recognize "HttpClientBuilder" it did refactor HttpClient.
    – snapplex
    Apr 16, 2015 at 22:53
  • HttpClientBuilder is part of Apache's HTTP components. Did you incorporate it into your project and import it in your class? It can be confusing because Java's classes are similarly named.
    – MCToon
    Apr 17, 2015 at 4:27
  • I found a ported version of the Apache library, but upon further research it would appear android is actually recommending the use of HttpUrlConnection, instead of HttpClient. android-developers.blogspot.com/2011/09/… ---Could you provide an example of set/geting cookies with a post/get using HttpUrlConnection instead of HttpClient?
    – snapplex
    Apr 18, 2015 at 0:52

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