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I searched the stack overflow a little and all I found was, that regex in R are a bit tricky and not convenient compared to Perl or Python.

My problem is the following. I have long file names with informations inside. The look like the following:

20150416_QEP1_EXT_GR_1234_hs_IP_NON_060.raw
20150416_QEP1_EXT_GR_1234-1235_hs_IP_NON_060.raw
20150416_QEP1_EXT_GR_1236_hs_IP_NON_060_some_other_info.raw
20150416_QEP1_EXT_GR_1237_hs_IP_NON_060

I want to extract the parts from the filename and convert them conveniently into values, for example the first part is a date, the second is machine abbreviation, the next an institute abbreviation, group abbreviation, sample number(s) etc...

What I do at the moment is constructing a regex, to make (almost) sure, I grep the correct part of the string:

regex <- '([:digit:]{8})_([:alnum:]{1,4})_([:upper:]+)_ etc'

Then I use sub to save each snipped into a variable:

date <- sub(regex, '\\1', filename)
machine <- sub(regex, '\\2', filename)
etc

This works, if the filename has the correct convention. It is overall very hard to read and I am search for a more convenient way of doing the work. I thought about splitting the filename by _ and accessing the string by index might be a good solution. But sometimes, since the filenames often get created by hand, there are terms missing or additional information in the names and I am looking for a better solution to this.

Can anyone suggest a better way of doing so?

EDIT

What I want to create is an object, which has all the information of the filenames extracted and accessible... such as my_object$machine or so....

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    What's your expected output? Apr 16 '15 at 6:43
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    From the example showed, it is not clear where the institute, group abbreviation starts/ends etc. It would be better to show the expected result as @AvinashRaj mentioned
    – akrun
    Apr 16 '15 at 6:47
  • Every part is separated by _ so the string split solution would in general work... I just looking for some suggestions of better ways... In general I like the Python way, where you can directly define your variable names re.match(r"(?P<first_name>\w+) (?P<last_name>\w+)", "Malcolm Reynolds")
    – drmariod
    Apr 16 '15 at 6:53
  • @akrun i think you already provided a solution of extracting and assigning the contents of captured groups into variables. Apr 16 '15 at 6:59
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    yep, this part But sometimes, since the filenames often get created by hand, there are terms missing or additional information in the names and I am looking for a better solution to this. Apr 16 '15 at 7:03
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The help page for ?regex actually gives an example that is exactly equivalent to Python's re.match(r"(?P<first_name>\w+) (?P<last_name>\w+)", "Malcolm Reynolds") (as per your comment):

## named capture
notables <- c("  Ben Franklin and Jefferson Davis",
              "\tMillard Fillmore")
#name groups 'first' and 'last'
name.rex <- "(?<first>[[:upper:]][[:lower:]]+) (?<last>[[:upper:]][[:lower:]]+)"
(parsed <- regexpr(name.rex, notables, perl = TRUE))
gregexpr(name.rex, notables, perl = TRUE)[[2]]
parse.one <- function(res, result) {
  m <- do.call(rbind, lapply(seq_along(res), function(i) {
    if(result[i] == -1) return("")
    st <- attr(result, "capture.start")[i, ]
    substring(res[i], st, st + attr(result, "capture.length")[i, ] - 1)
  }))
  colnames(m) <- attr(result, "capture.names")
  m
}
parse.one(notables, parsed)

The normal way (i.e. the R way) to extract from a string is the following:

text <- "Malcolm Reynolds"
x <- gregexpr("\\w+", text) #Don't forget to escape the backslash
regmatches(text, x)
[[1]]
[1] "Malcolm"  "Reynolds"

You can use however Perl-style group naming by using argument perl=TRUE:

regexpr("(?P<first_name>\\w+) (?P<last_name>\\w+)", text, perl=TRUE)

However regmatches does not support it, hence the need to create your own function to handle that, which is given in the help page:

parse.one <- function(res, result) {
       m <- do.call(rbind, lapply(seq_along(res), function(i) {
         if(result[i] == -1) return("")
         st <- attr(result, "capture.start")[i, ]
         substring(res[i], st, st + attr(result, "capture.length")[i, ] - 1)
       }))
       colnames(m) <- attr(result, "capture.names")
       m
     }

Applied to your example:

 text <- "Malcolm Reynolds"
 x <- regexpr("(?P<first_name>\\w+) (?P<last_name>\\w+)", text, perl=TRUE)
 parse.one(text, x)
     first_name last_name 
[1,] "Malcolm"  "Reynolds"

To go back to your initial problem:

filenames <- c("20150416_QEP1_EXT_GR_1234_hs_IP_NON_060.raw", "20150416_QEP1_EXT_GR_1234-1235_hs_IP_NON_060.raw", "20150416_QEP1_EXT_GR_1236_hs_IP_NON_060_some_other_info.raw", "20150416_QEP1_EXT_GR_1237_hs_IP_NON_060")
regex <- '(?P<date>[[:digit:]]{8})_(?P<machine>[[:alnum:]]{1,4})_(?P<whatev>[[:upper:]]+)'
x <- regexpr(regex,filenames,perl=TRUE)
parse.one(filenames,x)
     date       machine whatev
[1,] "20150416" "QEP1"  "EXT" 
[2,] "20150416" "QEP1"  "EXT" 
[3,] "20150416" "QEP1"  "EXT" 
[4,] "20150416" "QEP1"  "EXT" 
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  • I completely missed that part... I don't know why... Thanks also for the function parse.one. That looks like what I was thinking of... Will test this and maybe ask back in case of trouble!
    – drmariod
    Apr 16 '15 at 9:47

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