-3

Consider the following code:

#include <iostream>

class CTest
{
public:
    CTest() : c(0)
    {}
    void Method1()
    {
        c++;
        std::cout<<"c: "<<c<<std::endl;
    }
private:
    int c;
};

int main()
{
    CTest A,B,C;
    A.Method1();
    B.Method1();
    C.Method1();
    return 0;
}

c: 1

c: 1

c: 1

for each object of this type, the c value is different. To avoid name conflict, I am interested to put the c variable inside the function since Method1 is the only place where it is supposed to be used. My concern is how to make it independent for each different object. Is there any built-in C++ solution?

#include <iostream>

class CTest
{
public:
    CTest()
    {}
    void Method1()
    {
        static int c=0;
        c++;
        std::cout<<"c: "<<c<<std::endl;
    }
private:
};

int main()
{
    CTest A,B,C;
    A.Method1();
    B.Method1();
    C.Method1();
    return 0;
}

c: 1

c: 2

c: 3

  • 1
    first of all, why do you want to do that? You could put c into the class scope, but then, read the first sentence – Dmitry Ledentsov Apr 16 '15 at 7:51
  • @DmitryLedentsov The problem is the scope. I want to put c into the method scope. What is c in real case has a confusing name and there are a few other methods using very similar names. Renaming them makes the code very confusing. Better to put each variable into scope of its method. – ar2015 Apr 16 '15 at 7:56
  • 1
    @ar2015 you probably need to decompose the class into several ones. – Anton Savin Apr 16 '15 at 7:57
  • 1
    @ar2015 Yes, I'm serious. And the fact that the class is big as you say, makes this suggestion even more viable. – Anton Savin Apr 16 '15 at 8:01
  • 1
    I.e. Single Responsibility Principle, in case you want a counter and CTest, which should do something other than counting. If you can separate the concerns, you're more likely to come up with a solution that doesn't require static variables – Dmitry Ledentsov Apr 16 '15 at 12:43
1

You could do this with templates,

template <typename int> class CTest
{
    void Method1()
    {
        static int c = 0;
    }
};

And instantiate CTest<1> A;, CTest<2> B; etc, taking care that you use a different int each time. That way, you get a different c per <n>, which is local to Method1. But this is quite contrived, will not work if you want to instantiate CTests dynamically, and I don't think I'd use it in production.

Perhaps an approach using the pImpl idiom would be better.

0

If this is just a naming issue, then you can just use different names:

class CTest
{
public:
    void Method1()
    {
        int& c = unique_but_similar_to_something_else;
        c++;
        std::cout << "c: " << c <<std::endl;
    }
private:
    int unique_but_similar_to_something_else;
};

This allows your variable to have a correct name within class scope, but a more friendly name within method scope.

  • different names are very confusing. A user cant simply find where that variable would be used and why. Why C++ is not supporting such a simple ability? – ar2015 Apr 16 '15 at 11:22
  • @ar2015 Sorry, what is it that C++ does not support? – quamrana Apr 16 '15 at 12:35
  • supporting independent static variable inside method for each different object – ar2015 Apr 16 '15 at 13:35
  • @ar2015 Yes, but which language does? – quamrana Apr 16 '15 at 13:36
  • @ar2015 You've just defined instance variable. If you were to have many classes, one for each method, then have a master class which inherits from all of them, then I think you've got what you need. – quamrana Apr 16 '15 at 14:10
-1
class CTest
{
public:
    CTest() : MY__c(0)
    {

    }
    void Method1()
    {
        int& c = MY__c; // now c is of different meaning and doesn't spoil the "c" we want to have no conflicts with...
        c++;
        std::cout << "c: " << c << std::endl;
    }
private:
    int MY__c;
};
  • 1
    Please add some explanations for your code. – Gilsha Apr 16 '15 at 8:29
  • This is a class static var. This code will output 1 2 3 exactly as asked. – Vladimir Apr 16 '15 at 11:40
  • @Vladimir I think that the OP was indicating that the second example is exactly wrong and not wanted. – quamrana Apr 16 '15 at 12:34
  • sorry, I see there is already the same answer.. ) – Vladimir Apr 17 '15 at 8:37

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