7

My classes are

  • Base
    • Derived_A
    • Derived_B
  • Parent
    • Child_One
    • Child_Two

Base has two signature functions:

virtual void foo( const Parent& ) = 0;
virtual void bar( const Base& ) = 0;

, which other parts of the program expect.

The problem is:

Derived_A treats Child_One and Child_Two the same. But Derived_B treats them differently.

How should I implement this?

One way is to find out what kind of object is passed to Derived_B.foo. This would be apparently "a design flaw". The other way I tried is to change the signature functions as:

class Base
{
  class Derived_A;
  class Derived_B;

//  virtual void bar( const Base& ) = 0;
  virtual void bar( const Derived_A& ) = 0;
  virtual void bar( const Derived_B& ) = 0;
}

class Derived_A: public virtual Base
{ 

  virtual void foo( const Parent& ) = 0;
}

class Derived_B: public virtual Base
{ 
  virtual void foo( const Child_A& ) = 0;
  virtual void foo( const Child_B& ) = 0;
}

But now the bar function cannot use Base.foo. So I have to write the bar function twice, although the code is exactly the same.

Are there any other ways to deal with the problem? which one do you suggest?

P.S. I couldn't think of a good title. Please feel free to modify it.

  • You cannot pass children of Parent to foo(Parent). You can only pass Parent instances. See stackoverflow.com/questions/274626/what-is-object-slicing You need references or pointers for polymorphism. – eerorika Apr 16 '15 at 9:33
  • 4
    Look up the visitor design pattern. – Peter Apr 16 '15 at 9:34
  • I actually use references in my program. I tried to simplify it but overdid it. – Eliad Apr 16 '15 at 9:47
2

Without details of what the two type hierarchies' relation is with each other and how they interact, it's impossible to say what approach is appropriate. I've composed an overview of the other answers and another viable alternative that can be extended to the visitor pattern which was mentioned in a comment.

Performing the polymorphic behaviour in the children implementing a virtual function in Parent as already suggested by Joey Andres is quite typical object oriented solution for this problem in general. Whether it's appropriate, depends on the responsibilities of the objects.

The type detection as suggested by Olayinka and already mentioned in your question certainly smells kludgy, but depending on details, can be the minimum of N evils. It can be implemented with member function returning an enum (I guess that's what Olayinka's answer tries to represent) or with a series of dynamic_casts as shown in one of the answers in the question you linked.

A trivial solution could be to overload foo in Base:

struct Base {
    virtual void foo(const Parent&) = 0;
    virtual void foo(const Child_Two&) = 0;
};
struct Derived_A: Base { 
    void foo(const Parent& p) {
        // treat same
    }
    void foo(const Child_Two& p) {
        foo(static_cast<Parent&>(p));
    }
};
struct Derived_A: Base { 
    void foo(const Parent& p) {
        // treat Child_One (and other)
    }
    void foo(const Child_Two& p) {
        // treat Child_Two
    }
};

If there are other subtypes of Base that treat Child_One and Child_Two the same, then the implementation of foo(const Child_Two&) may be put in Base to avoid duplication.

The catch of this approach is that foo must be called with a reference of proper static type. The call will not resolve based on the dynamic type. That may be better or worse for your design. If you need polymorphic behaviour, you can use the visitor pattern which essentially adds virtual dispatch on top of the solution above:

struct Base {
    foo(Parent& p) {
        p.accept(*this);
    }
    virtual void visit(Child_A&) = 0;
    virtual void visit(Child_B&) = 0;
};

struct Parent {
    virtual void accept(Base&) = 0;
};

struct Child_A: Parent {
    void accept(Base& v) {
        v.visit(*this);
    }
};
// Child_B similarly

struct Derived_A: Base { 
    void treat_same(Parent&) {
        // ...
    }
    void visit(Child_A& a) {
        treat_same(a);
    }
    void visit(Child_B& b) {
        treat_same(b);
    }
};
struct Derived_B: Base { 
    void visit(Child_A&) {
        // ...
    }
    void visit(Child_B&) {
        // ...
    }
};

There's a bit more boilerplate, but since you seem very averse to implementing the behaviour in the children, this may be good approach for you.

|improve this answer|||||
  • Derived_A and Derived_B are subclasses of Base. You need to edit your answer. It does not make sense. – Eliad Apr 16 '15 at 11:43
  • @Furihr I added a visitor pattern example which seems appropriate for you. – eerorika Apr 16 '15 at 12:01
  • I am implementing the visitor pattern. But it seems to be the solution. – Eliad Apr 18 '15 at 10:47
4

The problem you are describing is called Double Dispatch. The link describes the problem and a few possible approaches to a solution (including polymorphic function signatures and the visitor pattern).

|improve this answer|||||
2

You could've easily made a virtual foo method in Parent. Since you want Derive_A to treat all Parent's subclasses the same, why not implement a class that does just that in Parent. That is the most logical thing, since chances are, if you want to do the same to both of them, then both of them must have similar data, which is exist in Parent.

class Parent{
   virtual void treatSame(){
       // Some operations that treat both Child_A, and Child_B
       // the same thing to both Child_A and Child_B.
   }
   virtual void foo() = 0;
}

Since you want Derived_B to do different operations in both Child_A and Child_B, take advantage of polymorphism. Consider the rest of the classes below:

class Child_A : public Parent{
    virtual void foo(){
        // Foo that is designed for special Child_A.
    }
}

class Child_B : public Parent{
    virtual void foo(){
        // Foo that is designed for special Child_B.
    }
}


class Base{
     virtual void foo(Parent) = 0;
     virtual void bar(Base) = 0;
}

class Derived_A: public Base
{ 
  virtual void foo( Parent& p){
     p.treatSame();
  }
}

class Derived_B: public Base
{ 
  virtual void foo( Parent& p){
      p.foo();  // Calls appropriate function, thanks to polymorphism.
  }
}

A possible usage is the following:

int main(){
    Child_A a;
    Child_B b;

    Derived_A da;
    da.foo(a);  // Calls a.treatSame();
    da.foo(b);  // Calls a.treatSame();

    Derived_B db;
    db.foo(a);  // Calls a.foo();
    db.foo(b);  // Calls b.foo();
}

Note that this will only work when the parameters are pointer or reference (I prefer to deal with reference when possible). Virtual dispatch (selecting appropriate function) won't work otherwise.

|improve this answer|||||
  • virtual function in Parent is exactly what I would do. treatSame could be removed and it's implementation simply put in Derived_A::foo, but it's hard to tell which makes better sense in such an abstract example. – eerorika Apr 16 '15 at 9:54
  • you can't put foo in parent Base calls foo and operates on Parent. The operation Base does on Parent inside foo may require access to things Parent.foo can't access. – Olayinka Apr 16 '15 at 9:58
  • @user2079303 But having methods that deal directly with Parent in Derived_A::foo is a code smell, specifically, the coupling is too tight (relies too much on other classes). Methods that are specific to Parent must stay with Parent, otherwise, you got to rethink your design. – Joey Andres Apr 16 '15 at 9:59
  • 1
    @JoeyAndres, I know what you are saying, but calling Child_B::foo() cannot help when the main operation is done in Derived_B and NOT in Child_B. Derived_B has the information that Child_B does not. Again, in your example Child_A and Child_B act (not treated) differently. – Eliad Apr 16 '15 at 10:21
  • 1
    To make it more clear. In your implementation I call Child_A and she says "hello"; I call Child_B, she says "How do you do?!". They act differently. But I want to take Child_A to school and Child_B to kindergarten. They are treated differently. – Eliad Apr 16 '15 at 10:27
1

I'm not sure of the syntax but you get the gist.

class Base{
  virtual void bar( Base ) = 0;
  virtual void foo( Parent ) = 0;
}

class Derived_A: public virtual Base{ 
  virtual void foo( Parent ) = 0;
}

class Derived_B: public virtual Base{ 
  virtual void foo( Parent ){
      //switch case also works
      return parent.get_type() == Parent::TYPE_A ? foo_A((Child_A)parent) : foo_B((Child_B)parent);
  }
  virtual void foo_A( Child_A ) = 0;
  virtual void foo_B( Child_B ) = 0;
}

class Parent{
  virtual int get_type() = 0;
}

class Child_A: public virtual Parent{ 
     return Parent::TYPE_A;
}

class Child_B: public virtual Parent{ 
     return Parent::TYPE_B;
}
|improve this answer|||||
  • This is the first approach. I could use it but apparently this is a design flaw. – Eliad Apr 16 '15 at 10:13
  • @Furihr How is this a design flaw? – Olayinka Apr 16 '15 at 10:26
  • I cannot find where (on stackoverflow) I read it now. But, It said something like "If your program needs to find out the type of an object and act accordingly, it is a design flaw." Since it was someone with 28.6k or 26.8(?) reputation. I thought s/he knew what s/he where talking about. – Eliad Apr 16 '15 at 10:34
  • @Furihr I totally agree with you but in this case I believe that the design is flawed only because the problem is. From your comment in the other answer. Before deciding who to take to school or kindergarten you must know which one of them it is individually. The other solution is adding virtual methods to Parent such that these methods are called specifically when Derived_B calls its foo. But this is also flawed. – Olayinka Apr 16 '15 at 11:21

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