3

I'm trying to make a register/login system. To check if usernames and email addresses aren't used, I use this :

$username = $_POST['uLogin'];
    $usernameLC = strtolower($username);
    $query1 = $db0->query("SELECT userLogin FROM tbuser WHERE userLogin=':login';");
    $query1->bindValue(":login", $usernameLC, PDO::PARAM_STR);

But it doesn't work. I can create as much users with the same username as I want. By extension, it also won't let me connect onto the website as it doesn't bind values or anything, so it can't compare my username to the one in the DB.

Verifying if a username is not taken worked when I used it like this

$username = $_POST['uLogin'];
    $usernameLC = strtolower($username);
    $query1 = $db0->query("SELECT userLogin FROM tbuser WHERE userLogin='$usernameLC';");

But it isn't the proper way to go :/

Can anybody help ? :)

5

First off, if you're going to prepare, use ->prepare(), and remove quotes in your named placeholders, they don't need to have that:

$query1 = $db0->prepare("SELECT userLogin FROM tbuser WHERE userLogin= :login");

Then $query1->execute(), the prepared statement after the binding, so all in all:

$username = $_POST['uLogin'];
$usernameLC = strtolower($username);
$query1 = $db0->prepare('SELECT userLogin FROM tbuser WHERE userLogin = :login'); // prepare
$query1->bindValue(':login', $usernameLC, PDO::PARAM_STR); // bind
$query1->execute(); // execute
  • Oops, I didn't notice them not preparing. Good catch there Ghost ;-) – Funk Forty Niner Apr 16 '15 at 14:06
  • @Fred-ii- funny thing is, i just noticed it while fixing the indentation of the answer lol :D – Kevin Apr 16 '15 at 14:09
  • 1
    I was typing mine at the (same) time and didn't notice your answer. OP should choose yours to accept. Cheers I just made an additional note at the bottom of mine. – Funk Forty Niner Apr 16 '15 at 14:10
  • Thanks, it works great. When logging in though, comparing submitted password to the password in DB returns false. I try stocking the received password in $_SESSION['test'] to see what it gets and print_r($_SESSION); returns me this : Array ( [test] => Array ( [userPwd] => test12 [0] => test12 ) ) (test12 is my password, userPwd is the password Field in the db) Any idea ? ^^' – Batte Man Apr 16 '15 at 14:33
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    Please do not dump code in comments and that would qualify as another question @BatteMan – Jay Blanchard Apr 16 '15 at 14:40
8

They're not working because your binded values contain quotes; remove them.

userLogin=':login'

as

userLogin=:login

"Verifying if a username is not taken worked when I used it like this"

WHERE userLogin='$usernameLC'
  • You need to remove the quotes in the bind as already stated on top, and make sure you're using PDO to connect with, as stated below; if that is the case.

Using setAttribute(PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE, PDO::ERRMODE_EXCEPTION) would have signaled the syntax errors.

Read up on how to use prepared statements in PDO, to prepare and execute:


An insight:

Make sure you are indeed using a PDO connection rather than a mysqli-based (it's unknown). I see these types of questions often, where OP's use mysqli_ to connect with and querying with PDO.

Those different MySQL APIs do not intermix with each other.

If you're using mysqli_ to connect with:


Add error reporting to the top of your file(s) which will help find errors, if any in regards to your POST arrays, or other possible errors.

<?php 
error_reporting(E_ALL);
ini_set('display_errors', 1);

// rest of your code

Sidenote: Error reporting should only be done in staging, and never production.


Edit:

"Thanks, it works great. When logging in though, comparing submitted password to the password in DB returns false. I try stocking the received password in $_SESSION['test'] to see what it gets and print_r($_SESSION); returns me this : Array ( [test] => Array ( [userPwd] => test12 [0] => test12 ) ) (test12 is my password, userPwd is the password Field in the db) Any idea ? ^^"

In regards to a comment you left about using passwords.

It seems you are storing passwords in plain text, rather than a hash. This is highly discouraged, as well as being stored in sessions; a very bad idea.

See this Q&A on Stack on hashed passwords:

Using PHP's password_hash() function and password_verify() function.

For PHP < 5.5 use the password_hash() compatibility pack.


A note about the column type and length when storing a hashed password.

  • The password column should be VARCHAR.
  • It should also be long enough to store the hash.
  • Using VARCHAR(255) is best.
  • Looks like I pissed somebody off in the last 1/2 hour and downvoting me in spite. You're going to lead a very miserable life my friend. – Funk Forty Niner Dec 15 '15 at 13:48

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