-1

Let's say I want to create a Math library. I would need to manipulate Vectors in different dimensions, so I would like to have one class per dimension (a.k.a Vector2, Vector3, Vector4 ...)

So far so good. But it will lead to severe code duplication, as Vector3 is mostly a Vector2 with a z attribute used in some functions.

So I had an idea. Code duplication is a task for machines, not humans, so I can write this:

In Vector.hpp:

#ifndef VECTOR_HPP
#define VECTOR_HPP

#define VECTOR_DIM 2
#include "_Vector.hpp"
#define VECTOR_DIM 3
#include "_Vector.hpp"
#define VECTOR_DIM 4
#include "_Vector.hpp"
#undef VECTOR_DIM

#endif

In _Vector.hpp:

// This header was not protected from multiple inclusions on purpose

#define VECTOR_NAME Vector ## VECTOR_DIM

class VECTOR_NAME
{
public:
    // Some methods here ...

    float x;
    float y;
#if VECTOR_DIM >= 3
    float z;
#endif
#if VECTOR_DIM >= 4
    float w;
#endif
};

#undef VECTOR_NAME

This would simplify the task a lot, but is it good practice?

6
  • 10
    Why not using c++ templates? Preprocessor macros are almost always a bad idea. – πάντα ῥεῖ Apr 16 '15 at 22:11
  • You won't be able to implement a meaningful interface this way. – Captain Giraffe Apr 16 '15 at 22:12
  • 3
    Also instead of dimension dedicated variable names like x,y,z or w, you should use indices, pointing to an array index of float values. – πάντα ῥεῖ Apr 16 '15 at 22:16
  • How your methods are written if you do not even know, what fields will be in a class? – myaut Apr 16 '15 at 22:18
  • @Nax: you asking what is a good practice. Templates are considered to be a good practice in C++, preprocessor is considered ugly and harmful. – myaut Apr 16 '15 at 22:40
6

Given your posted code, you could easily replace it with the following and not have to use pre-processor tricks.

template <int dim> struct Data;

template <> struct Data<2>
{
   float x;
   float y;
};

template <> struct Data<3> : Data<2>
{
   float z;
};

template <> struct Data<4> : Data<3>
{
   float w;
};

template <int dim> class Vector
{
   public:
      // Some methods here ...
      Data<dim> data;
};

You can easily extend Vector and Data to support more functionality.

Not only that, but you can prevent invalid values of dim while instantiating Vector by making sure that Data is only defined for the set of pre-determined valid values of dim.

1
  • 2
    @Nax, using templates is, in general, a better approach than using pre-processor macros. If you think hard enough, what you are trying to do using pre-processor macros can probably be done using templates. This site is not probably the best place to figure out how to use templates in your complex code base. You have to take the answers and advice received in this site in the the right spirit and apply them as best as you can to your complex project. – R Sahu Apr 17 '15 at 2:28
2

What similarity in functionality should lead to duplication in code?

Considering the question in the post title, "Is declaring multiple similar classes with the preprocessor good practice?" first off all, let's look at whether the duplication should be eliminated at all. Yes, you've read right—shared code can be worse than duplication, depending on the duplication's context.

As a rule of thumb

  • coincidental duplication should stay
  • systematic duplication should be factored out

Note that 'coincidental' doesn't mean 'accidental'. On the contrary, coincidentally duplicated code will often be written consciously so. The key point is that the similar functionalities don't have an underlying common principal. Thus, even if they happen to be similar today, it's important that they can evolve independently.

Also note that 'systematic' doesn't have to mean you've planned for it. It's the same 'systematic' as in 'systematic error', i.e. that the duplication is due to an underlying common principal, whether consciously so or not.

Vectors

Applied to the example you give in the question description, differently-dimensioned vector types in a math library, it's probably save to say that a lot of the duplication will be of the systematic type and should be eliminated. But in other cases, it might not be cut so clear.

How should unwanted duplication be eliminated?

Tools at our disposal

If it shall happen at compile time, your options in C would be limited. But you tagged the question as a C++ one and even though C and C++ share their precompiler, C++ has more to offer: Inline functions, pragmas and last but not least template classes and template functions.

R Sahu's answer already nicely shows how templates might be applied to your case. Much more is possible with templates: In C++, there is a whole development discipline called 'template meta programming'.

It can be a bit harder to get a template solution to work than quickly get something working with the pre-processor. So why should you opt for templates over pre-processor macros and includes?

Think of your (library) users

Getting something that 'works' might be sufficient for code that you just use for yourself and that doesn't require a lot of maintenance. But if you're writing a library, your users will want to get informed by the compiler when they make detectable mistakes in using it. As a corollary, you'll want to know that the library does something meaningful when invoked in a way that compiles without error. That is extremely hard to get right with macros for non-trivial logic, as you'll have to think off several issues:

  • Guaranteeing type safety
  • If the macros take arguments, can those arguments again be macros?
  • If the macros take arguments, can those arguments be function or method invocations?
    • What if those functions have side effects? (You'll have to be careful that your macro, even if it might use the functions' return values several times, doesn't call the functions several times.)
  • Macros aren't namespaced, so you'll have to avoid collisions by name-prefixing conventions

While it might initially be harder with templates to get something that works at all, it'll be much easier than with makros to get something that works correctly.

0

No, it isn't good practice. I would advise against doing it, for reasons mentioned in other answers (using templates is likely a better choice). That being said, preprocessor and macros might come in handy in some circumstances. I have successfully used macros in a case where I knew the similar classes to code where small, where very unlikely to change (both declaration and implementation) or be inherited, and implementing using templates would have been a mess much harder to write/understand, and therefore more bug-prone. Indeed, this code has still not be touched again, is working smoothly, and I still think that macros were the best choice.

Though, based on the information provided in the question, I don't feel you're in one of those circumstances. But use whatever works for you, especially if it's a personal project: if it bites you in the future, you would have learned something. ;-)