50

Say I construct two numpy arrays:

a = np.array([np.NaN, np.NaN])
b = np.array([np.NaN, np.NaN, 3])

Now I find that np.mean returns nan for both a and b:

>>> np.mean(a)
nan
>>> np.mean(b)
nan

Since numpy 1.8 (released 20 April 2016), we've been blessed with nanmean, which ignores nan values:

>>> np.nanmean(b)
3.0

However, when the array has nothing but nan values, it raises a warning:

>>> np.nanmean(a)
nan
C:\python-3.4.3\lib\site-packages\numpy\lib\nanfunctions.py:598: RuntimeWarning: Mean of empty slice
  warnings.warn("Mean of empty slice", RuntimeWarning)

I don't like suppressing warnings; is there a better function I can use to get the behaviour of nanmean without that warning?

  • 1
    why is the warning an issue? – Padraic Cunningham Apr 17 '15 at 0:27
  • 14
    I must admit, the warning makes no sense. One sensible behaviour is to consistently return nan; the other, to consistently raise an exception. A warning is such a meh response. – Amadan Apr 17 '15 at 0:29
  • What's wrong with suppressing warnings? You don't have to do it wholesale - just suppress the warning where you know you might use np.nanmean on an array of all NaNs. – ali_m Apr 17 '15 at 0:29
  • 2
    Also, you don't have to look to nanmean - you get the same silly thing with np.mean([]). – Amadan Apr 17 '15 at 0:32
  • 2
    Your question actually contained the answer I seeked for the meaning of this warning. – erickrf Oct 7 '15 at 5:57
47

I really can't see any good reason not to just suppress the warning.

The safest way would be to use the warnings.catch_warnings context manager to suppress the warning only where you anticipate it occurring - that way you won't miss any additional RuntimeWarnings that might be unexpectedly raised in some other part of your code:

import numpy as np
import warnings

x = np.ones((1000, 1000)) * np.nan

# I expect to see RuntimeWarnings in this block
with warnings.catch_warnings():
    warnings.simplefilter("ignore", category=RuntimeWarning)
    foo = np.nanmean(x, axis=1)

@dawg's solution would also work, but ultimately any additional steps that you have to take in order to avoid computing np.nanmean on an array of all NaNs are going to incur some extra overhead that you could avoid by just suppressing the warning. Also your intent will be much more clearly reflected in the code.

  • 3
    This is a useless warning and there is no seterr for it like other errors – dashesy Mar 29 '16 at 0:58
  • 2
    Are you sure that the only warning that might be raised here is this particular one? That is the reason for not suppressing warnings in general - what if this raises another warning (possibly in some future version) ? – Mr_and_Mrs_D Dec 3 '18 at 22:54
  • Exactly, what @Mr_and_Mrs_D, this seems like a good way to cover up actual bugs in the code. Numpy should probably raise a specific warning that sub-classes RuntimeWarning. – naught101 Jan 24 at 6:23
  • I came here when I searched for this warning: RuntimeWarning: Mean of empty slice. In my case it was due to finding the mean of an empty array. I should have paid attention to the warning as this results in a NaN value which caused me a lot of grief in model building, so the warning isn't simply supposed to be ignored. – mudassirkhan19 Jul 15 at 10:52
11

A NaN value is defined to not be equal to itself:

>>> float('nan') == float('nan')
False
>>> np.NaN == np.NaN
False

You can use a Python conditional and the property of a nan never being equal to itself to get this behavior:

>>> a = np.array([np.NaN, np.NaN])
>>> b = np.array([np.NaN, np.NaN, 3])
>>> np.NaN if np.all(a!=a) else np.nanmean(a)
nan
>>> np.NaN if np.all(b!=b) else np.nanmean(b)
3.0

You can also do:

import warnings
import numpy as np

a = np.array([np.NaN, np.NaN])
b = np.array([np.NaN, np.NaN, 3])

with warnings.catch_warnings():
    warnings.filterwarnings('error')
    try:
        x=np.nanmean(a)
    except RuntimeWarning:
        x=np.NaN    
print x    
  • That works for one-dimensional numpy arrays. Unfortunately in my actual use case I have multidimensional data and I'm taking the mean along one dimension. e.g. np.nanmean(np.array([[np.NaN], [3]]),1) – Michael Currie Apr 17 '15 at 0:45
  • Add appropriate slicing then. Also, np.nanmean(np.array([[np.NaN], [3]]),1) seems to work as expected... – dawg Apr 17 '15 at 0:46
  • 1
    Why use a try/except block? np.nanmean(a) will return np.nan anyway. – ali_m Apr 17 '15 at 0:55
  • Just strikes me as more expected syntax to put this into a try / except block as other Python code would be for something that might be different than the normal return. – dawg Apr 17 '15 at 0:56
  • 1
    I suppose you are right about that... – dawg Apr 17 '15 at 0:59

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