5

I want foo() not to modify the array. So I declared array in foo() as const

If I compile this code, compiler is complaining:

#include <stdio.h>

void foo(const int arr[5][5])
{
    int i,j;
    for( i = 0; i < 5; i++)
    {   
        for( j = 0; j < 5; j++) 
        {       
            printf("%d\n", arr[i][j]);
        }       
    }   
}
int main()
{
    int val = 0;
    int i,j;
    int arr[5][5];
    for( i = 0; i < 5; i++)
    {   
        for( j = 0; j < 5; j++) 
        {       
            arr[i][j] = val++;
        }       
    }   
    foo(arr);
}

The warning is:

allocate.c: In function 'main':
allocate.c:26:9: warning: passing argument 1 of 'foo' from incompatible pointer type
     foo(arr);
         ^
allocate.c:3:6: note: expected 'const int (*)[5]' but argument is of type 'int (*)[5]'
 void foo(const int arr[5][5])
      ^

How else can I declare formal parameter as constant?

9

1 Answer 1

-1

I assume that you do not want foo() to be able to modify the array in the interest of encapsulation.

As you are likely aware, in C arrays are passed into functions by reference. Because of this, any changes that foo() makes to the values array will be propagated back to the variable in main(). This is not in the interest of encapsulation.

const will not prevent foo() from modifying the array The C keyword const means that something is not modifiable. A const pointer cannot modify the address that it points to. The value(s) at that address can still be modified. In c, By default, you cannot assign a new pointer value to an array name. There is no need for const. Similar to a const pointer, the values in this array can still be modified. Encapsulation problem is not solved.

To encapsulate foo() from your main() function, put your array in a struct. Structs are passed by value and so foo() will receive a copy of the data. As it has a copy, foo() will not be able to alter the original data. Your functions are encapsulated.

Solution (that works!):

#include <stdio.h>

typedef struct
{
    int arr[5][5];
} stct;

void foo(const stct bar)
{
    int i,j;
    for( i = 0; i < 5; i++)
    {   
        for( j = 0; j < 5; j++) 
        {       
            printf("%d\n", bar.arr[i][j]);
        }       
    }   
}
int main()
{
    int val = 0;
    int i,j;
    stct bar;
    for( i = 0; i < 5; i++)
    {   
        for( j = 0; j < 5; j++) 
        {       
            bar.arr[i][j] = val++;
        }       
    }   
    foo(bar);
}

I put const in the foo() definition because you asked how you could declare the formal parameter as a constant. It works but is not needed.

void foo(stct bar)

Removing the const will not break the function.

1
  • const int a[] = { 1, 2 }; a[0]=3; -> error. const on an array or pointer means pointer to const. You're talking about something like int *const p = &something, where the pointer is a const, but the pointed-to location is not const. a++; -> error. a[0]=0; -> ok. Jul 7, 2015 at 21:43

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