1

I'm using Stateprinter to print/compare my types. It works quite nicely, however, it does compare the actual type of each (sub) object instead of the declared type of the subobject.

An example:

class X {
  string Foo;
  int Bar;
}

interface IMyData {
  public X MyConfig { get; }
}

Now, when calling:

var cfg = ConfigurationHelper.GetStandardConfiguration();
cfg.Add(new PublicFieldsAndPropertiesHarvester());
var printer = new Stateprinter(cfg);

// ...

IMyData v = new MyDataWithMoreStuff();

printer.PrintObject(v);

This will print all the public fields and properties of MyDataWithMoreStuff instead of only the public state visible via IMyData.

Is there a way to do this with Stateprinter, or if that is currently not implemented, is it even possible using C# reflection to walk the "member tree" of an arbitrary object and treat the fields not by the concrete types that they have at runtime, but by the (base / interface) types the variables are declared with?

1

As of v2.1.xx you can now specify projections of types based on other types. Ie. do the following

    [Test]
    public void TestIncludeByType()
    {
        var sut = new AtoD();
        Asserter assert;

        assert = TestHelper.CreateShortAsserter();
        assert.PrintEquals("new AtoD() { A = 1 B = 2 C = 3 D = 4 }", sut);

        assert = TestHelper.CreateShortAsserter();
        assert.Project.IncludeByType<AtoD, IA>();
        assert.PrintEquals("new AtoD() { A = 1 }", sut);

        assert = TestHelper.CreateShortAsserter();
        assert.Project.IncludeByType<AtoD, IA, IB>();
        assert.PrintEquals("new AtoD() { A = 1 B = 2 }", sut);

        assert = TestHelper.CreateShortAsserter();
        assert.Project.IncludeByType<AtoD, IA, IB, IC>();
        assert.PrintEquals("new AtoD() { A = 1 B = 2 C = 3 }", sut);

        assert = TestHelper.CreateShortAsserter();
        assert.Project.IncludeByType<AtoD, IA, IB, IC, ID>();
        assert.PrintEquals("new AtoD() { A = 1 B = 2 C = 3 D = 4 }", sut);
    }

    [Test]
    public void TestExcludeByType()
    {
        var sut = new AtoD();
        Asserter assert;

        assert = TestHelper.CreateShortAsserter();
        assert.PrintEquals("new AtoD() { A = 1 B = 2 C = 3 D = 4 }", sut);

        assert = TestHelper.CreateShortAsserter();
        assert.Project.ExcludeByType<AtoD, IA>();
        assert.PrintEquals("new AtoD() { B = 2 C = 3 D = 4 }", sut);

        assert = TestHelper.CreateShortAsserter();
        assert.Project.ExcludeByType<AtoD, IA, IB>();
        assert.PrintEquals("new AtoD() { C = 3 D = 4 }", sut);

        assert = TestHelper.CreateShortAsserter();
        assert.Project.ExcludeByType<AtoD, IA, IB, IC>();
        assert.PrintEquals("new AtoD() { D = 4 }", sut);

        assert = TestHelper.CreateShortAsserter();
        assert.Project.ExcludeByType<AtoD, IA, IB, IC, ID>();
        assert.PrintEquals("new AtoD() { }", sut);
    }

but this is filtering based on types, not a general harvesting of state based upon reference types. That, I don't think it is possible the way the code is now:

 class IntroSpector  
 {
    void Introspect(object source, Field field)
    {
        if (IntrospectNullValue(source, field))
            return;

        var sourceType = source.GetType();

        ...

so StatePrinter asks for the underlying type (GetType()). You probably need to overload the method or maybe better, code a ReferenceAwareIntrospector which takes a third parameter, the reference parameter, and works with that.

It should be fairly easy to do this and making the introspector configurable is likewise an easy extension of the Configuration class.

  • Thanks. I would have to start digging into .NET reflection, which I have managed not to touch so far, to get an understanding of this, but I'm fine with the info that it doesn't work out of the box atm. (If you fell like it, a short sketch of what might be needed to get this to work recursively would be nice.) – Martin Ba Apr 18 '15 at 18:59
  • well, start with the above. You also need a new PrintObject() method taking the type you want to use as outset since a type can implement many interfaces. The only real challenge to do this, I would say, is to handle generic types, say a Dictionary<Dictionary<IPerson, string>> or something,, that may require a bit of book keeping. How about raising a defect on github ? StatePrinter is anything short of features, I don't see why this shouldn't fit right in. – Carlo V. Dango Apr 18 '15 at 19:16
  • Instead of having a variable source type, use a method parameter, of type Type and have the caller pass that information. Any clearer? – Carlo V. Dango Apr 18 '15 at 22:15
  • Thanks. I'll have to come back to this, not sure when I'll get around to it. You see - some of my Tests would've been cleaner when I know only the actual interfaces to be compared, but since it's working nicely with a simple PublicFieldsAndPropertiesHarvester, I guess it's rather low priority for me to follow this route further at the moment. – Martin Ba Apr 18 '15 at 22:19
  • Yeah its a good idea. Raise an issue and hope others will implement. While you wait you have alternatives which are simpler alternatives to implementing introspection. You can configure filters with eg Configuration.Exclude or you can create your custom FieldHarvester. See github.com/kbilsted/StatePrinter/blob/master/doc/… – Carlo V. Dango Apr 19 '15 at 4:07

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