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In Ruby, is it possible to define a method that can be called directly as a class method and is also able to be mixed in as a class method? That is, without using self.included or self.extended to create an equivalent class or instance method.

Neither of these approaches works:

module A
  def foo(s)
    puts s
  end
end

class One
  extend A
end

One.foo("one")
#A.foo("a")

module B
  def self.foo(s)
    puts s
  end
end

class Two
  include B
end

#Two.foo("two")
B.foo("b")

There seems to be some confusion as to what is being asked. Here's a less abstract scenario. A is a mixin that can be used directly. B is a mixin, intended to be used independently of A, that "wraps" one of A's methods.

module A
  # #foo has to be defined in order to be mixed in via `extend`.
  # Being mixed in via `include` has the same issue but inverted.
  def foo(s) A.foo(s) end 
  def self.foo(s) puts "A: " + s end
end

module B
  def foo(s) A.foo("B: " + s) end
end

class One; extend A end

class Two; extend B end

One.foo("one")
Two.foo("two")

In order for this to work, both A#foo and A::foo have to be separately defined. Existing facilities such as Module#module_function don't work under this scenario.

  • Sorry, couldn't understand, what is the issue here? – Saurabh Apr 17 '15 at 17:47
  • what is the problem with extending, again? – Andrey Deineko Apr 17 '15 at 17:58
  • Your question and your code are misaligned. Right now One.foo will puts the variable s to the screen because you used extend which makes these class methods. In the second example you have not done anything to class Two because B.foo is scoped explicitly to B due to the self. Please clearly define your intended result – engineersmnky Apr 17 '15 at 17:58
  • The desire result is that either One.foo("one"); A.foo("a") or Two.foo("two"); B.foo("b") work with the same method. – Joshua Hoblitt Apr 18 '15 at 6:15
  • @JoshuaHoblitt if that's all you want create a module with a method foo and the simply use extend in the classes. – engineersmnky Apr 18 '15 at 12:48
2

I will try not to be definitive but to my knowledge the answer to your question is No. If you would like to mixin both instance and class methods then the standard methodology would be something like:

module A 
  def self.included(base)
    #this will extend the class you included A in
    #using A::ClassMethods definition
    base.extend(ClassMethods)
  end
  #these methods will be added as class_methods to any class
  #that includes A
  module ClassMethods
    def foo(s)
      "You fooed the class with #{s}"
    end
  end
  #this will be added as an instance method as it would be in a standard include
  def bar(s)
    "You barred an instance with #{s}"
  end
end

class Mixed
  include A
end
Mixed.foo("Hello")
#=> "You fooed the class with Hello"
Mixed.new.bar("Hello")
#=> "You barred an instance with Hello"

I hope this answers your question as it was a bit unclear what your intentions were. Since you question does not seem to require instance methods you could also do this

module A 
  def foo(s)
    "called foo with #{s}"
  end
end
module B
  include A
  alias_method :a_foo, :foo
  def foo(s)
    "B called foo from A #{a_foo(s)}"
  end
end
class Mixed
  extend B
end

Mixed.foo("Mixed")
#=>"B called foo from A called foo with Mixed"

One more update

This is a strange pattern but it will work for your use case I believe

module A
  def foo(s)
    "fooed with #{s}"
  end
  def bar(s)
    "barred with #{s}"
  end
end

module B
  include A
  included_modules.each do |mod|
    (mod.instance_methods - Object.methods).each do |meth|
      alias_method "#{mod.name.downcase}_#{meth}", meth
    end
  end
end

class Mixed
  extend B
end

Mixed.methods - Object.methods 
#=> [:a_foo, :a_bar, :foo, :bar]

This way you can overwrite methods in B and call the A version but if you don't overwrite it will still call the A version.

You could also monkey patch the Module class if you'd like to make this functionality universal

class Module
  def include_with_namespace(*mods)
    #Module#include runs in reverse so to maintain consistency my patch does as well
    mods.reverse.each do |mod|
      include mod
      (mod.instance_methods - Object.methods).each do |meth|
        alias_method "#{mod.name.downcase}_#{meth}", meth
      end
    end
  end
end 

Then this will work

module C
  def foo(s)
    "C's foo with #{s}"
  end
  def see_me
    "You can see C"
  end 
end

module B;include_with_namespace A, C; end

class Mixed;extend B;end

Mixed.methods - Object.methods
#=> [:a_foo, :a_bar, :c_foo,:c_see_me, :foo, :bar, :see_me]
Mixed.foo("name")
#=> "fooed with name"
Mixed.c_foo("name")
#=> "C's foo with name"
  • 1
    I don't think that's what the OP was asking, but it's still worthwhile to show the customary way that class methods are included. – Cary Swoveland Apr 17 '15 at 18:52
  • The question did specifically say without self.included... and not having to separately define the class and instance version of the method. – Joshua Hoblitt Apr 21 '15 at 2:50
  • @JoshuaHoblitt yes but just because you ask a question does not mean you will get the response you want. This is how it is conventionally done in ruby. – engineersmnky Apr 21 '15 at 13:08
  • This is a very interesting solution -- importing the instance method to be wrapped and aliasing it to preserve it. Before I mark this as the accepted solution, why is A extending self? – Joshua Hoblitt Apr 21 '15 at 16:24
  • 1
    @JoshuaHoblitt since you wanted this to be more universal I have added a monkey patch to Module that allows for the preserved name spacing. Please note in the example Mixed.foo will be A.foo because Module#include runs in reverse so my code does as well. Hope this helps and thanks for the fun project. – engineersmnky Apr 22 '15 at 13:32
0

You could write:

module A
  def foo(s)
    puts s
  end
end

class One
  singleton_class.include A
end

One.foo('hi')
  #=> 'hi'

but that's pretty close to Object#extend.

If:

module A
  def self.foo(s)
    puts s
  end
end

and you want to know if A can be referenced from a class C to make foo a class method of C, my understanding is that the answer is "no". I say "my understanding" because it is not something that can be proved; it was, as I understand, a design decision Matz made.

  • What difference would this have over class One; extend A; end? – engineersmnky Apr 17 '15 at 17:56
  • @engineersmnky, none. It's probably how extend is implemented. – Cary Swoveland Apr 17 '15 at 17:59
  • You could technically access A.foo through One if you don't mind a top_level warning :). Something like One::A.foo will work but produces warning: toplevel constant A referenced by One::A. you could also use something like One.included_modules.find{|mod| mod == A}.foo("hi) but that seems overly complex to just reference A. – engineersmnky Apr 17 '15 at 18:38
  • @engineersmnky, I never thought about that, but it still doesn't include the class method. btw, whenever I see your name I think it's too bad you didn't get in on Clinton's vowel drop. – Cary Swoveland Apr 17 '15 at 18:44
  • Hahaha my name is actually inspired by the Grateful Dead's song Monkey and the Engineer and you are right it will never act as a class method doing it this way – engineersmnky Apr 17 '15 at 19:21

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